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How To Post In Perfect German on Social Media

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You’re learning to speak German, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in German.

At Learn German, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your German in the process.

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1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in German

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in German. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

Tom eats at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down Tom ’s post.

Gutes Essen mit guten Freunden!
“Good food with good friends!”

1- Gutes Essen

First is an expression meaning “Good food.”
A standard expression to refer to delicious food.

2- mit guten Freunden

Then comes the phrase - “with good friends.”
Repeating the adjective “good” instead of choosing a different positive adjective makes the sentence flow nicely and is quite common in social media.

COMMENTS

In response, Tom ’s friends leave some comments.

1- Schön, ich wäre gerne dabei gewesen!

His girlfriend, Franziska, uses an expression meaning - “Nice, I would have liked to be there!”
Use this expression to partake in the conversation and also indicate that you’d have liked to be part of the group.

2- Sieht sehr lecker aus!

His neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “Looks very delicious!”
Use this comment to agree with the poster about the food.

3- Edel! Gefällt mir!

His college friend, Cem, uses an expression meaning - “Noble! I like it!”
Another, pleasant way of saying the same as the previous two posters..

4- Nächstes Mal bin ich dabei!

His high school friend, Katharina, uses an expression meaning - “Next time I’ll be there!”
Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic about joining the poster next time.

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • gute Freunde: “good friends”
  • schön: “nice”
  • ich wäre gerne: “I would have liked to”
  • lecker: “delicious”
  • edel: “noble”
  • gefallen: “to like”
  • nächstes Mal: “next time “
  • dabei sein: “to join”
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a German restaurant, and wow the staff with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in German

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everybody loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these German phrases in posts when you visit a mall.

    Franziska shops with her sister at the mall, posts an image of the two of them, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Franziska’s post.

    Shoppen mit meinem Schwesterherz!
    “Shopping with my sis!”

    1- Shoppen

    First is an expression meaning “Shopping.”
    Comes from the English word “to shop” and is used only for shopping for clothes, shoes, etc., not for groceries. It is very commonly used.

    2- mit meinem Schwesterherz

    Then comes the phrase - “with my sis.”
    Commonly used to refer to your sister. It is literally translated as “sister heart” and is a casual way of saying you are very close to your sister.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Franziska’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Brauchst du wirklich noch mehr Schuhe?

    Her boyfriend, Tom , uses an expression meaning - “Do you really need (even) more shoes?”
    Use this expression to show your exasperation with your girlfriend’s shopping sprees. Probably best to reserve this for people who know you well, and understand that you’re not trying to be confrontational or critical in a harsh way.

    2- Juhu! Shoppen ist immer gut!

    Her high school friend, Lisa, uses an expression meaning - “Yay! Shopping is always good!”
    Use these phrases to indicate you’re happy for the poster and what they’re busy with.

    3- Ich kenn da ein paar echt gute Designerläden!

    Her college friend, Cem, uses an expression meaning - “I know a few really good designer shops!”
    Use this expression to partake in the conversation, and to make a suggestion that might be useful to the poster.

    4- War gestern Zahltag?

    Her nephew, Mario, uses an expression meaning - “Was it payday yesterday?”
    Use this expression to be humorous with a slightly sarcastic edge.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • shoppen: “to shop “
  • Schwesterherz: “sis”
  • brauchst du wirklich: “do you really need”
  • Schuh: “shoe”
  • juhu: “yay”
  • ist immer gut: “is always good”
  • ein paar echt gute: “a few really good”
  • Zahltag: “payday”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in German

    Sports events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunities for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in German.

    Tom plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of the teams, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Tom ’s post.

    Es kann nur einen Sieger geben!
    “There can only be one winner!”

    1- Es kann nur einen geben

    First is an expression meaning “there can only be one.”
    On social media it is common to use one sentence expressions to capture people’s interest with as few words as possible. It is a common German expression often said in a joking way during tournaments or while watching sports or other competitions.

    2- Sieger

    Then comes the phrase - “winner.”
    This means winner and can refer to any kind of competition.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Tom ’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Wart nur ab!

    His college friend, Cem, uses an expression meaning - “You just wait!”
    Use this expression if you’re part of the competing team, and sees the poster’s comment as a friendly dare.

    2- Viel Glück und viel Spaß!

    His neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “Good luck and have fun!”
    Use this phrase as a warmhearted wish to the players.

    3- Aber bist du es?

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Mario, uses an expression meaning - “But is it you?”
    Use this expression to be humorous and teasing the poster.

    4- Na da bin ich mal gespannt!

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Lisa, uses an expression meaning - “Well then I’m curious!”
    Use this expression to express interest in the game and to be part of the conversation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Sieger: “winner”
  • Wart nur ab: “you just wait”
  • nur: “just”
  • viel Glück!: “good luck!”
  • viel Spaß!: “have fun!”
  • bist du es?: “is it you?”
  • na: “well”
  • gespannt sein: “to be curious”
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in German

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    Franziska shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of the artist, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Franziska’s post.

    So viele Erinnerungen!
    “So many memories!”

    1- so viele

    First is an expression meaning “so many.”
    A casual remark that can be used whenever you unexpectedly find many of the same things in one place.

    2- Erinnerungen

    Then comes the phrase - “memories.”
    It is quite common to use a short expression like “so many memories”, and not a full sentence such as “I have so many memories” or “This brings up so many memories.” These expressions are used to allude to something without going into detail, only for friends to pick up on what you are trying to say.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Franziska’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Spielte man so was damals?

    Her nephew, Mario, uses an expression meaning - “Did they used to play something like that back in the day?”
    Use this expression to be playfully sarcastic about the poster’s choice of music. Humorous sarcasm on social media should always be reserved for people you know well, so as to avoid misunderstandings.

    2- Ein sehr schönes Lied!

    Her supervisor, Andreas, uses an expression meaning - “A very nice song!”
    Use this expression to agree with the poster about the agreeability of the song.

    3- Hihi ja ich erinnere mich!

    Her high school friend, Lisa, uses an expression meaning - “Haha yes, I remember!”
    Use this expression to indicate that the song is known to you.

    4- Das werde ich mir gleich mal anhören.

    Her neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “I’ll listen to it in a moment.”
    Use this expression to indicate that you’re interested in the topic, and want to partake in the conversation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • so viele: “so many”
  • so was: “something like that”
  • damals: “back in the days”
  • Lied: “song”
  • hihi: “haha”
  • sich erinnern: “to remember”
  • gleich: “in a moment”
  • anhören: “to listen to”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. German Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers in German!

    Tom goes to a concert, posts an image of the band, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Tom ’s post.

    Die beste Band!
    “The best band!”

    1- Die beste

    First is an expression meaning “the best.”
    Describing something as “the best” is quite common on social media to show you really like something.

    2- Band

    Then comes the phrase - “band.”
    This expression is very short and powerful. It is clear though that the poster is only talking about their own opinion. You can use any feminine nouns in this way.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Tom ’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Und unser Lied!

    His girlfriend, Franziska, uses an expression meaning - “And our song!”
    Use this expression to indicate to your boyfriend that you’re feeling sentimental about your shared song.

    2- Na ja … beste …

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Mario, uses an expression meaning - “Well … best … ”
    Use this phrase to be slightly sarcastic, in a teasing way.

    3- Die mochtest du schon immer!

    His high school friend, Katharina, uses an expression meaning - “You always liked them!”
    Use this chatty comment to indicate that you recognize the band’s importance to the poster.

    4- Also mein Geschmack ist es nicht aber viel Spaß!

    His supervisor, Andreas, uses an expression meaning - “Well, it isn’t my taste but have fun!”
    Use this expression to share an opinion that differs from the poster’s but in a friendly way.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • die beste: “the best”
  • Band: “band”
  • unser Lied: “our song”
  • na ja: “well “
  • mögen: “to like”
  • schon immer: “always”
  • also: “well”
  • Geschmack: “taste”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert, which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in German

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Use these German phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    Franziska accidentally breaks her mobile phone, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Franziska’s post.

    Bin erstmal telefonisch nicht zu erreichen!
    “For now, I’m not reachable by phone!”

    1- Bin erstmal nicht zu erreichen

    First is an expression meaning “For now I won’t be reachable.”
    A standard sentence used when informing people that your phone is not working at the moment.

    2- telefonisch

    Then comes the phrase - “by telephone.”
    Used whenever you do anything by phone. For example, ordering by telephone or telling someone you will get in touch by calling them. The ending indicates that something is done by/via something.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Franziska’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Oh man was hast du jetzt schon wieder angestellt?

    Her high school friend, Lisa, uses an expression meaning - “Oh man, what do you do now?”
    Use this expression to indicate some exasperation and/or sympathy with the poster’s situation.

    2- Das war sowieso alt! Zeit für ein neues!

    Her college friend, Cem, uses an expression meaning - “It was old anyway! Time for a new one!”
    Use these phrases if you know the poster’s phone is broken (because this fact cannot be derived from her post), and want to be encouraging.

    3- Wir haben aber noch eins zuhause rumliegen!

    Her boyfriend, Tom , uses an expression meaning - “We still have one lying around at home!”
    Like the comment above - use this phrase only if you know the phone has been lost or broken. The phrase indicates that you wish to be helpful.

    4- Oh nein, hat dein Handy den Geist aufgegeben?

    Her neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “Oh no, has your mobile phone become a ghost?”
    Use this question if you’re not sure what happened to the poster’s phone, and wish for more information.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • erstmal: “for now”
  • oh man: “oh boy”
  • eh: “anyway”
  • Zeit für: “time for”
  • rumliegen: “to lie around”
  • zu Hause: “at home”
  • oh nein: “oh no”
  • den Geist aufgeben: “to give up the ghost (a common German saying used whenever a machine stops working)”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to discuss an accident in German. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in German

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in German!

    Tom gets bored at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Tom ’s post.

    Was ist heute so los? Irgendwer unterwegs?
    “What is happening today? Anybody out and about?”

    1- Was ist heute so los?

    First is an expression meaning “What is happening today?.”
    This is a casual expression to ask about what is going on that day, usually followed by friends suggesting ideas.

    2- Irgendwer unterwegs?

    Then comes the phrase - “Anybody out and about?.”
    This is a common social media expression as it is not a full sentence but is just asking if anybody is doing anything that the poster could join.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Tom ’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Komm mit den Jungs und mir mit in den Club!

    His college friend, Cem, uses an expression meaning - “Come to the club with the boys and me!”
    Make this suggestion if you wish to be helpful, and invite the poster somewhere.

    2- Wir könnten Essen gehen!

    His girlfriend, Franziska, uses an expression meaning - “We could go out for dinner!”
    Another suggestion if your boyfriend is bored, and you wish to be helpful and encouraging.

    3- Entscheidungen, Entscheidungen. Triff die richtige!

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Mario, uses an expression meaning - “Decisions, decisions. Make the right one!”
    Use these phrases if you wish to tease the poster with a slightly sarcastic comment about the suggestions, perhaps.

    4- Du bist immer herzlich eingeladen.

    His high school friend, Katharina, uses an expression meaning - “You’re always (warmly) invited.”
    Use this expression to warm heartedly invite the poster out too - another comment that shows you wish to be helpful.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • was ist los?: “what is happening?”
  • unterwegs: “out and about”
  • mitkommen: “to come with”
  • wir könnten: “we could”
  • Entscheidung: “decision”
  • richtig: “right”
  • immer : “always”
  • herzlich eingeladen.: “warmly invited”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in German

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in German about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    Franziska feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of herself looking tired, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Franziska’s post.

    Ich kann nicht mehr! Wann ist endlich Wochenende?
    “I’m exhausted! When’s the weekend?”

    1- Ich kann nicht mehr!

    First is an expression meaning “I am exhausted!.”
    Literally “I cannot anymore”. It is a very common expression that’s used when you are running and out of breath or stressed at work or school or just generally need a break.

    2- Wann ist endlich Wochenende?

    Then comes the phrase - “When is it finally the weekend?.”
    This is a rhetorical question and is very commonly used, as everybody loves to talk about looking forward to the weekend.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Franziska’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Dann koche ich heute!

    Her boyfriend, Tom, uses an expression meaning - “Then I will cook today!”
    Use this expression to be supportive and helpful to your girlfriend.

    2- Oh nein, was ist denn da los?

    Her high school friend, Lisa, uses an expression meaning - “Oh no, what’s going on there?”
    Use this expression to indicate concern for your friend.

    3- Tja kann ja nicht jeder Student sein!

    Her nephew, Mario, uses an expression meaning - “Well, not everybody can be a student!”
    Use this expression to joke with the poster, teasing them a bit.

    4- Ist alles in Ordnung?

    Her neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “Is everything ok?”
    Use this expression to show your concern and worry about the poster’s wellbeing.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • können: “to be able to”
  • dann: “then”
  • kochen: “to cook”
  • ohjemine: “oh no”
  • was ist denn da los?: “what is going on there?”
  • Student: “student”
  • sein: “be”
  • in Ordnung: “ok”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you know how to say you’re exhausted in German! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in German

    So life happens, and you manage to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in German.

    Tom suffers a painful injury, posts an image of his foot, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Tom’s post.

    Fuß eventuell gebrochen! Erstmal kein Fußball!
    “Foot possibly broken! No football for now!”

    1- Fuß eventuell gebrochen!

    First is an expression meaning “Foot possibly broken!.”
    This is a short statement giving the main facts. Men often seem to use short statements like this.

    2- Erstmal kein Fußball!

    Then comes the phrase - “No football for now!.”
    This second statement is equally short and typical of social media. Not too much information, just the facts, afterwards friends usually ask for more details.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Tom ’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Was wird aus unserem Turnier am Wochenende?

    His college friend, Cem, uses an expression meaning - “What’ll become of our tournament this weekend?”
    Ask this question to either make conversation (Cause the answer should be clear), or to really want information from the poster.

    2- Mein armer Schatz!

    His girlfriend, Franziska, uses an expression meaning - “My poor sweetheart!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling sorry for your boyfriend.

    3- Das klingt gar nicht gut! Kann ich irgendwie helfen?

    His neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “That doesn’t sound good at all! Can I help in any way?”
    Use this expression to show your concern, and to offer help.

    4- Du Tollpatsch! Das wird schon wieder!

    His high school friend, Katharina, uses an expression meaning - “You klutz! It’ll be alright!”
    Use this insult to show your sympathy while also being supportive and encouraging.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Fuß: “foot”
  • Turnier: “tournament”
  • Wochenende: “weekend”
  • Schatz: “sweetheart”
  • irgendwie : “in any way”
  • helfen: “to help “
  • Tollpatsch: “klutz”
  • das wird schon wieder: “It will be alright”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in German

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    Franziska feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Franziska’s post.

    Wann ist endlich Sommer?
    “When is it finally summer?”

    1- Wann ist endlich Sommer?

    First is an expression meaning “When is it finally summer?.”
    This is a very common expression used by many people, especially towards the end of winter or during spring. This is a rhetorical question, used to express the poster ́s negative feelings regarding the weather, not actually asking when summer starts.

    2- Wann ist endlich Sommer?

    Then comes the phrase - “When is it finally summer?.”
    Many German people think summer is the best season and think it is too short and not hot enough (temperatures can vary anywhere between 15-35 degrees and it is not very consistent. One day might be hot and sunny, the next cool and rainy). Summer is seen as the time to get outdoors, go swimming or have BBQs. The long evenings (it gets dark at around 9pm in the middle of summer) are enjoyed because during the long winter there is not much sunshine and it gets dark in the afternoon.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Franziska’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ich komme gerade aus dem Urlaub. Irgendwo ist immer Sommer.

    Her college friend, Cem, uses an expression meaning - “I just got back from vacation. There’s always summer somewhere.”
    Use these phrases to comment in a chatty way, sharing a bit of personal information.

    2- Am Wochenende soll es schön werden!

    Her supervisor, Andreas, uses an expression meaning - “It’s supposed to be nice on the weekend!”
    Use this expression if you have encouraging news about the weather, with the purpose of being supportive.

    3- Sommer, Sonne, Strand und Meer!

    Her high school friend, Lisa, uses an expression meaning - “Summer, sun, beach and sea!”
    Use this expression to stay part of the conversation.

    4- Es wird jeden Tag heller!

    Her neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “It gets lighter everyday!”
    Use this expression if you wish to encourage the poster, and remind them that the end of the bad weather is close.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • endlich: “finally”
  • kommen: “to come”
  • sollen: “to be supposed to”
  • es: “it “
  • Strand: “beach”
  • Meer: “sea”
  • jeden Tag: “every day”
  • hell: “light”
  • How would you comment in German when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in German

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    Tom changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of him and Franziska together, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Tom ’s post.

    Hinter jedem großen Mann stand immer eine liebende Frau.
    “Behind every great man is (always) a loving woman.”

    1- Hinter jedem großen Mann stand immer eine liebende Frau.

    First is an expression meaning “Behind every great man is always a loving woman..”
    This is a quote from Pablo Picasso. Quotes are quite common on social media to get people’s attention and portray your post in a certain light.

    2- hinter jedem großen Mann

    Then comes the phrase - “behind every great man .”
    It usually means tall or big; however, in this case it is used as “great”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Tom ’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ich liebe dich!

    His girlfriend, Franziska, uses an expression meaning - “I love you!”
    Post this phrase if you like your boyfriend’s post, and if you love him, of course!

    2- Oh das freut mich für euch!

    His neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “Oh, I’m happy for you!”
    Use this expression if you are feeling positive and happy for the couple.

    3- Ihr seid so ein süßes Paar!

    His high school friend, Katharina, uses an expression meaning - “You are such a cute couple!”
    Use this expression if you feel optimistic about the relationship.

    4- Alles Gute mein bester!

    His college friend, Cem, uses an expression meaning - “All the best buddy!”
    Use this expression to tease the poster a bit.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • liebend: “loving”
  • lieben : “love “
  • oh: “oh”
  • sich freuen: “to be happy”
  • süß: “cute”
  • Paar: “couple”
  • Alles Gute: “All the best”
  • Alter: “buddy”
  • What would you say in German when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news - don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in German

    Wow, so things got serious, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in German.

    Franziska is getting married today, so she leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Franziska’s post.

    Der schönste Tag meines Lebens!
    “The most beautiful day of my life!”

    1- Der schönste Tag meines Lebens!

    First is an expression meaning “The most beautiful day of my life!.”
    This expression is often used to mean somebody’s wedding day. People understand this is usually related to a wedding even if the posters don’t specifically say they are getting married.

    2- der schönste Tag

    Then comes the phrase - “the most beautiful day .”
    “The most beautiful day” is a powerful statement. Usually people would say something like “it was such a beautiful day.” However, big events like weddings or the birth of a child often use superlatives like “the most beautiful”, “the best”, etc.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Franziska’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Und auch der schönste Tag meines Lebens!

    Her husband, Tom , uses an expression meaning - “And also the most beautiful day of my life!”
    Use this phrase in response to your new wife’s post.

    2- Ich bin so aufgeregt!

    Her high school friend, Lisa, uses an expression meaning - “I’m so excited!”
    Use this expression if you’re feeling very good about the pending wedding.

    3- Endlich ist der Tag gekommen. Meine herzlichsten Glückwünsche!

    Her neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “Finally, the day has come. My most heartfelt congratulations!”
    Use this expression to show you have eagerly awaited the wedding, and want to warmly congratulate the couple.

    4- Jetzt gibts kein Zurück mehr!

    Her college friend, Cem, uses an expression meaning - “Now there’s no turning back (anymore)!”
    Use this expression to tease the couple in a good natured way.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • schön: “beautiful”
  • auch: “also”
  • Leben: “life”
  • aufgeregt: “excited”
  • endlich: “finally”
  • Glückwunsch: “congratulations”
  • zurück: “back”
  • mehr: “anymore”
  • How would you respond in German to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about a year into the future after the marriage…

    13. Announcing Big News in German

    Wow, huge stuff is happening in your life! Announce it in German.

    Tom finds out he and his wife are going to have a baby, posts an image of the two of them, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Tom ’s post.

    Aus zwei werden drei! Wir bekommen ein Baby.
    “Two are becoming three! We are having a baby.”

    1- Aus zwei werden drei!

    First is an expression meaning “Two are becoming three!.”
    This is a common expression that’s used to announce a pregnancy. Even if there is no “we are having a baby” added, people will usually guess that a baby is on the way.

    2- Wir bekommen ein Baby.

    Then comes the phrase - “We are having a baby..”
    The verb used to express having a baby can literally be translated as “to get” or “to receive”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Tom ’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Wir sind so glücklich!

    His wife, Franziska, uses an expression meaning - “We are so happy!”
    Use this expression to comment positively on your husband’s post about the pregnancy.

    2- Herzlichen Glückwunsch! Das ist ein großes Ereignis in jedem Leben.

    His supervisor, Andreas, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations! That’s a big event in a person’s life.”
    This is a traditional congratulation, as well as a friendly personal opinion about the event. Use it to keep the conversation going, as other posters may agree with you and share their opinions.

    3- Tante Katharina babysittet gerne!

    His high school friend, Katharina, uses an expression meaning - “Aunt Katharina is happy to babysit!”
    Use this expression to show you are looking forward to the new arrival and hope to help taking care of the baby.

    4- Jetzt wird alles anders!

    His nephew, Mario, uses an expression meaning - “Now everything will be different!”
    Use this expression to tease the posters by appearing pessimistic, using a fact.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • werden: “to become”
  • glücklich : “happy”
  • Ereignis: “event”
  • jeder: “every “
  • Tante: “aunt”
  • babysitten: “to babysit”
  • alles: “everything”
  • anders: “different”
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting German Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in German.

    Franziska plays with her baby, posts an image of the little angel, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Franziska’s post.

    Mein kleiner Sonnenschein!
    “My little sunshine!”

    1- Mein kleiner Sonnenschein!

    An expression meaning “My little sunshine!.” This is a very common expression to refer to babies and small children. This can be used with any other masculine noun to mention that something is either small, such as “my little dog,” or smaller/younger than you, such as “my little brother”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Franziska’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ganz der Papa!

    Her high school friend, Lisa, uses an expression meaning - “Completely like Daddy!”
    Use this comment to make conversation about the baby’s similarity to its father.

    2- So ein schönes Bild.

    Her neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “Such a beautiful picture.”
    Use this expression if you appreciate the photo of mother and child.

    3- So süß!

    Her high school friend, Lisa, uses an expression meaning - “So cute!”
    Use this expression to comment on the baby’s charm.

    4- Wann übernimmt er die Firma?

    Her college friend, Cem, uses an expression meaning - “When is he taking over the company?”
    Use this expression if you’re feeling humorous.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Sonnenschein: “sunshine”
  • ganz : “completely”
  • Papa: “Daddy”
  • so ein: “such a “
  • Bild: “picture”
  • so süß: “so cute”
  • übernehmen: “to take over”
  • Firma: “company”
  • If your friend is a new mother or father, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in German! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. German Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions - some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    Tom goes to a family gathering, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Tom ’s post.

    Familie ist das wichtigste im Leben!
    “Family is the most important thing in life!”

    1- Familie ist das wichtigste im Leben!

    An expression meaning “Family is the most important thing in life!.” Statements like this are quite common on social media. In this case, the article before the noun is not needed as it means family in general. By capitalizing the “w” you can change the word from an adjective to a noun.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Tom ’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Es war schön alle wiederzusehen!

    His wife, Franziska, uses an expression meaning - “It was nice to see them all again!”
    Use this expression to indicate your appreciation of the family.

    2- Ich war nur wegen dem Essen da!

    His nephew, Mario, uses an expression meaning - “I was just there for the food!”
    Use this expression to be humorous with a negative comment. Use carefully, or you could come across as a spoil-sport.

    3- Ja, den Kontakt mit seiner Familie muss man pflegen!

    His supervisor, Andreas, uses an expression meaning - “Yes, one has to stay in touch with their family.”
    Use this expression to agree with the poster’s sentiment.

    4- Das sieht nach einem tollen Familienfest aus!

    His neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “That looks like a great family celebration!”
    Use this expression to indicate your appreciation of the poster’s family gathering.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Familie: “family”
  • wiedersehen: “to see again”
  • nur: “just”
  • da sein: “to be there”
  • Kontakt: “contact”
  • pflegen: “to maintain”
  • aussehen: “to look like”
  • toll: “great”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in German

    So, the family are going on holiday. Do you know to post and leave comments in German about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    Franziska waits at the airport for her flight, posts a selfie, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Franziska’s post.

    Zwei Wochen Sommer, Strand und Meer! Ich kann es gar nicht mehr abwarten!
    “Two weeks of summer, beach and sea! I can’t wait!”

    1- Zwei Wochen Sommer, Strand und Meer!

    First is an expression meaning “Two weeks of summer, beach, and the sea!.”
    This is a typical holiday post as the summer, beach and sea are often grouped into one expression. All of these words start with “s” in German, and this expression includes what many German people think is the essence of summer.

    2- Ich kann es gar nicht mehr abwarten!

    Then comes the phrase - “I can’t wait!.”
    This is a very common expression to show you are excited about something, similar to the English “I can’t wait!”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Franziska’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Aber wir sind mal wieder viel zu früh am Flughafen!

    Her husband, Tom, uses an expression meaning - “But we are at the airport way too early once again!”
    Use this expression to share personal information.

    2- Habt ihr all-inclusive gebucht?

    Her college friend, Cem, uses an expression meaning - “Did you book all-inclusive?”
    Ask this question if you’re curious about the poster’s booking details, and to keep the conversation going.

    3- Viel Spaß! Und keine Sorge, ich werde die Blumen gießen und den Briefkasten leeren!

    Her neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “Have fun! And don’t worry, I will water the flowers and empty the mailbox!”
    Use these phrases to wish the travellers well and be helpful taking care of their home. You will probably have arranged this with them beforehand!

    4- Na dann weiß ich ja wo ich hin muss wenn ich sturmfrei haben will.

    Her nephew, Mario, uses an expression meaning - “Well then I know where I have to go when I want to have the place to myself.”
    Use this phrase to tease the poster with a mock-threat.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • abwarten: “to wait”
  • mal wieder: “once again”
  • Flughafen: “airport”
  • all-inclusive: “all-inclusive”
  • keine Sorge: “don’t worry”
  • gießen: “to water”
  • wissen: “to know”
  • sturmfrei haben: “to have the place to oneself”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in German!

    Hopefully the rest of the trip is better!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in German

    So maybe you’re strolling around at a local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy German phrases!

    Tom finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Tom ’s post.

    Weiß jemand was das hier ist?
    “Does anyone know what this is?”

    1- Weiß jemand

    First is an expression meaning “does anyone know.”
    This is a general statement, as it refers to anyone reading this that might know something.

    2- was das hier ist

    Then comes the phrase - “what this is.”
    This is also a very general statement. This is commonly used when somebody has no idea what they have found.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Tom ’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Das frage ich mich auch!

    His wife, Franziska, uses an expression meaning - “I am asking myself the same thing!”
    Use this expression to indicate your interest in the topic, agree with the poster, and make conversation.

    2- Nanu, was habt ihr denn da gefunden?

    His neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “Oh wow, what have you found there?”
    Use this expression to make conversation by asking a rhethorical question.

    3- Ein Souvenir für mich?

    His nephew, Mario, uses an expression meaning - “A souvenir for me?”
    Use this expression if you’re expecting a gift from the poster.

    4- Ist es wertvoll?

    His college friend, Cem, uses an expression meaning - “Is it valuable?”
    Ask this question to indicate your interest in the topic, and would like to know more. Also a good way to keep the conversation going.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • wissen: “to know”
  • fragen: “to ask”
  • ich mich auch: “me too”
  • nanu: “oh wow”
  • finden: “to find”
  • Souvenir: “souvenir”
  • für mich: “for me”
  • wertvoll: “valuable”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in German

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in German, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    Franziska visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Franziska’s post.

    Es mit eigenen Augen zu sehen ist wirklich beeindruckend!
    “Seeing it with your own eyes is really impressive!”

    1- Es mit eigenen Augen zu sehen

    First is an expression meaning “to see it with your own eyes.”
    This is a common expression that is used when you see something famous in person instead of on TV or in pictures.

    2- ist wirklich beeindruckend

    Then comes the phrase - “is really impressive.”
    This is a common expression used when you are impressed by something.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Franziska’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Einer der Höhepunkte unserer Reise finde ich!

    Her husband, Tom , uses an expression meaning - “One of the highlights of our trip, I think!”
    Use this comment if you’re in agreement with your wife about the landmark’s importance.

    2- Postkarte bitte!

    Her high school friend, Lisa, uses an expression meaning - “Postcard please!”
    Use this phrase to indicate you’d like to receive a postcard from the poster of that location.

    3- Oh wenn ich nochmal jung wäre würde ich glatt mitkommen!

    Her supervisor, Andreas, uses an expression meaning - “Oh, if I was young again, I would even come with you!”
    Use this comment if you wish it was possible for you to travel to that destination too.

    4- Oh wirklich super!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Katharina, uses an expression meaning - “Oh, really great!”
    Use this expression to show you’re impressed and agree with the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • beeindruckend: “impressive”
  • Höhepunkt: “highlight”
  • Reise: “trip”
  • Postkarte: “postcard”
  • bitte: “please”
  • jung: “young”
  • mitkommen: “to come along”
  • super: “great”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in German

    So you’re doing nothing yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in German!

    Tom relaxes at a beautiful place, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Tom ’s post.

    Endlich kommt man mal zur Ruhe!
    “Finally coming to a rest for once!”

    1- Endlich mal

    First is an expression meaning “Finally for once.”
    This is a common expression. The “finally” indicates that they have been working hard or have been stressed for a while and now is a rare time to relax.

    2- zur Ruhe kommen!

    Then comes the phrase - “coming to a rest.”
    This is a common expression used after people finish work or when they have been stressed or angry and are trying to calm down.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Tom ’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Sieht aus wie damals auf Klassenfahrt!

    His high school friend, Katharina, uses an expression meaning - “Looks like back then on the class trip!”
    Use this comment to remind the poster of a previous experience, probably in your youth together.

    2- Nicht schlecht!

    His nephew, Mario, uses an expression meaning - “Not bad!”
    Use this expression to show you are rather impressed.

    3- In der Ruhe liegt die Kraft!

    His neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “The strength lies in serenity.”
    This is a personal opinion about the poster’s situation.

    4- Entspannung muss auch mal sein!

    His supervisor, Andreas, uses an expression meaning - “Relaxation is needed sometimes!”
    Use this expression to agree with the poster’s activity and even encourage them.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • zur Ruhe kommen: “come to a rest”
  • damals: “back then”
  • Klassenfahrt: “class trip”
  • schlecht: “bad”
  • Ruhe: “serenity”
  • Kraft: “strength”
  • Entspannung: “relaxation”
  • muss sein: “has to be”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in German When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    Franziska returns home after a vacation, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Franziska’s post.

    Endlich zuhause! Wir haben euch vermisst!
    “Finally home! We missed you!”

    1- Endlich zuhause!

    First is an expression meaning “Finally home!”
    This is a common expression used when returning home after a long day or a long trip.

    2- Wir haben euch vermisst!

    Then comes the phrase - “We missed you!”
    This is very common amongst friends and family when someone is gone for a while.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Franziska’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Auf zu neuen Taten!

    Her husband, Tom, uses an expression meaning - “On to new things!”
    Use this expression to make conversation.

    2- Willkommen zurück! Es war so ruhig ohne euch!

    Her neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “Welcome back! It was so quiet without you!”
    This is a traditional welcome greeting for people returning from a trip, while also sharing a personal feeling or experience.

    3- Du musst mir unbedingt alles erzählen! Kaffeekränzchen?

    Her high school friend, Lisa, uses an expression meaning - “You really have to tell me everything! Coffee get-together?”
    Use this expression to indicate that you’re curious about the poster’s trip and wish to know more about on a date.

    4- Vielen Dank für den Urlaubsgruß!

    Her supervisor, Andreas, uses an expression meaning - “Thank you very much for the greeting from (your) vacation!”
    This is appropriate if the poster has sent you a postcard or perhaps a personal text during their holiday.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • vermissen: “to miss”
  • auf zu: “on to”
  • ruhig: “quiet”
  • ohne euch: “without you”
  • erzählen: “to tell”
  • Kaffeekränzchen: “coffee get-together”
  • vielen Dank: “thank you very much”
  • Urlaubsgruß: “greeting from vacation”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media on celebratory days such as Christmas and New Year?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in German

    It’s a holiday and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    Tom would like to share some good wishes. He posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Tom ’s post.

    Ich wünsche allen frohe Weihnachten und einen guten Rutsch ins neue Jahr!
    “I wish everyone a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!”

    1- Ich wünsche allen frohe Weihnachten und einen guten Rutsch ins neue Jahr!

    First is an expression meaning “I wish everyone a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!.”
    This is the standard holiday greeting in Germany used throughout December. It is usually said during the days/week(s) before Christmas and includes “Happy New Year” since many people don’t see each other between Christmas and New Year, because that is often family time. On Christmas day people would only say “Merry Christmas”.

    2- einen guten Rutsch ins neue Jahr

    Then comes the phrase - “Happy New Year.”
    The literal translation is “a good slide into the new year”. This is the most common New Year’s greeting before the New Year.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Tom ’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Unser erstes Weihnachten zu Dritt!

    His wife, Franziska, uses an expression meaning - “Our first Christmas as three!”
    Use this expression to show you are happy about an unofficial milestone as a family.

    2- Heute Abend Glühwein?

    His college friend, Cem, uses an expression meaning - “Mulled wine tonight?”
    Use this question to make a suggestion.

    3- Es war schön euch gestern auf dem Weihnachtsmarkt zu treffen!

    His high school friend, Katharina, uses an expression meaning - “It was nice meeting you at the Christmas market yesterday!”
    Use these phrases if you have met the poster at a Christmas market, and want to comment on how pleasant the meeting was for you.

    4- Ich bringe euch nachher Weihnachtskekse vorbei!

    His neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “I will bring over Christmas cookies for you later on!”
    Use this expression to make plans with the poster, and be generous.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • wünschen: “to wish”
  • Weihnachten: “Christmas”
  • Abend: “evening”
  • Glühwein: “mulled wine”
  • Weihnachtsmarkt: “Christmas market”
  • treffen: “to meet”
  • Weihnachtskekse: “Christmas cookies”
  • vorbeibringen: “to bring over”
  • If a friend posted something about a holiday, which phrase would you use?

    Holidays are not the only special dates to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in German

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    Franziska goes to her birthday party, posts an image of the party, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Franziska’s post.

    Und wieder ein Jahr älter! Aber Geburtstagsfeiern werden nie langweilig!
    “And another year older again! But birthday parties will never get boring!”

    1- Und wieder ein Jahr älter!

    First is an expression meaning “And another year older again!.”
    This is a common phrase used by adults to describe their birthdays.

    2- Aber Geburtstagsfeiern werden nie langweilig!

    Then comes the phrase - “But birthday parties will never get boring!.”
    In Germany, children often bring cake or sweets to school on their birthday. Saying “Happy Birthday” before the actual day is considered bad luck, and German people would never celebrate a birthday early.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Franziska’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Nur das Beste für das neue Lebensjahr! Mögen alle deine Wünsche in Erfüllung gehen!

    Her neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “Only the best for your new year of life! May all your wishes come true!”
    Use these are warm birthday wishes to the poster.

    2- Tja, wir werden nicht jünger was?

    Her nephew, Mario, uses an expression meaning - “Well, we’re not getting younger, hmm?”
    Use this expression to tease the poster.

    3- Wir sind wie gute Weine! Wir werden besser mit dem Alter!

    Her high school friend, Lisa, uses an expression meaning - “We are like good wine! We get better with age!”
    Use this expression to positively comment on the poster’s improved appearance and being.

    4- Alles Gute! Ich freu mich auf die Party!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Katharina, uses an expression meaning - “All the best! I am looking forward to the party!”
    Post this if you are on your way to the poster’s party, and are congratulating them in advance.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • und wieder: “and again”
  • nur das Beste: “only the best”
  • in Erfüllung gehen: “to come true”
  • tja: “well”
  • was?: “hmm?”
  • Wein: “wine”
  • Alter: “age”
  • Party : “party “
  • If a friend posted something about a birthday, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in German

    Impress your friends with your German New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    Tom celebrates the New Year, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Tom ’s post.

    Frohes Neues Jahr! Wer hat gute Vorsätze fürs neue Jahr?
    “Happy New Year! Who has resolutions for the new year?”

    1- Frohes Neues Jahr!

    First is an expression meaning “Happy New Year!.”
    This is said at midnight and during the first few days of the new year.

    2- Wer hat gute Vorsätze fürs neue Jahr?

    Then comes the phrase - “Who has resolutions for the new year?.”
    Literally this means “good resolutions” or “good intentions”. It is the standard expression to use when people talk about New Year’s resolutions.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Tom ’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Frohes Neues Jahr! Jeder kann an sich arbeiten und heute ist der beste Tag damit anzufangen!

    His neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “Happy New Year! Everybody can work on themselves and today is the best day to begin!”
    This is a traditional New Year wish, and a personal opinion about New Year’s resolutions.

    2- Auf ein weiteres erfolgreiches Jahr!

    His college friend, Cem, uses an expression meaning - “To another successful year!”
    This is a salutation of and wish for the New Year.

    3- Frohes Neues Jahr! Ich bin mir sicher es wird ein gutes Jahr!

    His high school friend, Katharina, uses an expression meaning - “Happy New Year! I am sure it will be a good year!”
    This is again the traditional New Year’s wish, plus a personal opinion.

    4- Zählt “mehr Mädelsurlaube mit deiner Frau” als guter Vorsatz?

    His wife’s high school friend, Lisa, uses an expression meaning - “Does “more girl holidays with your wife” count as a resolution?”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • haben: “to have”
  • anfangen: “to begin “
  • auf ein weiteres : “to another”
  • erfolgreich: “successful “
  • sich sicher sein: “to be sure”
  • Jahr: “year”
  • zählen: “count”
  • Mädelsurlaub: “girls’ holiday”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in German

    What will you say in German about Christmas?

    Franziska celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Franziska’s post.

    Frohe Weihnachten! Ich hoffe jeder feiert mit seinen Lieben und findet viele Geschenke unter dem Weihnachtsbaum!
    “Merry Christmas! I hope everyone celebrates with their loved ones and finds a lot of presents under the Christmas tree!”

    1- Frohe Weihnachten! Ich hoffe jeder feiert mit seinen Lieben

    First is an expression meaning “Merry Christmas! I hope everyone celebrates with their loved ones .”
    It is common to say that you hope everyone is celebrating with their loved ones.

    2- und findet viele Geschenke unter dem Weihnachtsbaum!

    Then comes the phrase - “and finds a lot of presents under the Christmas tree!.”
    Saying you hope that people will find many presents under the Christmas tree is a very common expression related to Christmas. In Germany, presents are opened on the evening of the 24th of December.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Franziska’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Der Weihnachtsmann hat mich wohl dieses Jahr vergessen!

    Her nephew, Mario, uses an expression meaning - “Santa Claus seems to have forgotten me this year!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling excluded.

    2- Wir haben immer jede Menge Essen übrig also kommt ruhig vorbei in den nächsten Tagen!

    Her neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “We always have plenty of food left over so don’t hesitate to come over in the next few days!”
    Use this expression as an invitation to the poster to visit for casual meals.

    3- Frohe Weihnachten an die ganze Familie! Vielleicht sieht man sich in der Kirche?

    Her supervisor, Andreas, uses an expression meaning - “Merry Christmas to the whole family! Maybe we will see each other at church?”
    This is a traditional Christmas wish to the whole family. Use the question only if you are going to church yourself.

    4- Ich hab deine Geschenke schon ausgepackt! Woher wusstest du, dass ich genau das haben wollte?

    Her high school friend, Lisa, uses an expression meaning - “I have already opened your presents! How did you know exactly what I wanted?”
    Use this expression to show your appreciation for the poster’s gift.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Weihnachtsbaum: “Christmas tree”
  • Weihnachtsmann: “Santa Claus”
  • jede Menge: “plenty of “
  • in den nächsten Tagen: “in the next few days”
  • vielleicht: “maybe”
  • Kirche: “church”
  • Geschenke auspacken: “open presents”
  • haben wollen: “to want to have”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in German

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which German phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    Tom celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of them together, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Tom ’s post.

    Ein ereignisreiches Jahr! Auf die Zukunft!
    “An eventful year! To the future!”

    1- Ein ereignisreiches Jahr!

    First is an expression meaning “An eventful year!.”
    This is a common expression. The literal translation is “a year rich in events” or “a year rich in happenings”. It can be used both for good and not so good experiences, as it simply means a lot has happened, not necessarily all good.

    2- Auf die Zukunft!

    Then comes the phrase - “To the future!.”
    This is a common toast. It can be used for anniversaries, in business, or in general when friends are out having a drink. It is a very broad statement.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Tom ’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ein wunderbares Jahr! Auf viele weitere!

    His wife, Franziska, uses an expression meaning - “A wonderful year! To many more!”
    Use these phrases if you agree with your husband’s post.

    2- Ist der Junggesellenabschied wirklich schon so lange her?

    His college friend, Cem, uses an expression meaning - “Was the bachelor party really that long ago?”
    Use this expression to reminisce and point out how fast the time went.

    3- Auf viele weitere harmonische Jahre zusammen!

    His high school friend, Katharina, uses an expression meaning - “To many more harmonious years together!”
    Use this expression to wish the couple well.

    4- Feiert schön!

    His neighbor, Tanja, uses an expression meaning - “Have fun celebrating!”
    Use this expression to wish the couple merry celebrations.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Zukunft: “future “
  • wunderbar: “wonderful”
  • viele weitere: “many more”
  • Junggesellenabschied: “bachelor party”
  • lange her sein: “to be a long time ago”
  • harmonisch: “harmonious”
  • zusammen: “together”
  • feiern: “to celebrate “
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn German! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using cell phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in German

    7 Outstanding Resources for Learning German

    learning german

    German is a beautiful, important and challenging language, but fluency is definitely within your reach if you go about learning it in an efficient and intelligent way.

    Many people think they don’t have the time, money or dedication to learn a second language—especially a grammatically challenging language like German—but there are so many ways to avoid breaking the bank and reach fluency faster than ever before!

    e-learning

    Just by learning German through the intelligent use of these hand-picked online resources instead of paying for courses at a college or language school, you’ll save yourself literally thousands of dollars and also create the system that works best for you.

    Ultimately, one of the biggest drawbacks to language study programs at schools is that they have to be a “one size fits all” method to help the most students.

    This is a great way for many people to learn languages, but with these online resources you’ll sidestep the things that don’t help you learn and be speaking German sooner than you thought possible!

    Below I’ve listed some great resources to help you get started on your self-taught language journey. They’re not arranged in any particular order, so make sure to check them all out and find which ones work best for you!

    Speaking German

    1. HelloTalk

    HelloTalk is a fantastic language partner application that puts the world in the palm of your hand—literally!

    Within minutes, you could be talking to native German speakers that will correct your German, help you learn in context and maybe even become your friends!

    Establishing real, connected memories is half the battle in language learning, so why not start by making a new German friend?

    The only payment necessary is that you share knowledge of your native language with the people you encounter in return. Not bad, right?

    GermanPod101

    2. GermanPod101

    If you’ve been learning German for a while, you probably have previously stumbled upon some of GermanPod101’s widely-known daily podcasts or YouTube videos.

    While doing dishes, slicing potatoes or driving to work, plug in your headphones and pick up an audio or video lesson from the whopping 1,400+ available at GermanPod101.

    GermanPod101 shares only the finest German learning content on the internet. There you can find a variety of culturally relevant, fun and informational lessons.

    Why settle for boring whiteboard, caveman-level lessons when you have free access to this up-to-date, fun and easy-to-understand German learning resource?

    finding resources

    3. Deutsch-Lernen

    I don’t know if I’m the only one who has spent hours going from website to website trying to find just one or two helpful German sites.

    If you’ve done the same thing, you know how good it feels to find a site where you actually have good learning materials. Deutsch-Lernen is definitely one of those “Aha!” moments because it has material that is actually helpful for learning, testing and exploring German.

    You get access to free beginner and advanced courses as well as to tests that will assess your German level. No more wondering if you’re beginner, intermediate or advanced!

    Each lesson has useful exercises for learners of all level that will help push your German studies to the next level.

    4. FluentU

    FluentU is probably the closest thing you can get to moving to Germany without ever leaving your couch.

    Why?

    On FluentU, you’ll find a collection of well-chosen, authentic content that will give you everything you need to advance to the next level.

    There is a giant collection of videos, audio and other learning material in tons of different languages, so it’s the perfect place to go and jumpstart your German learning journey!

    Not convinced? Then take advantage of their 15-day free trial and see for yourself. You’re going to love it.

    talk

    5. Babbel

    If you’re looking for a one stop shop for everything you need to reach fluency from zero, Babbel would be a good place to start your search.

    With the use of interactive conversations with the conversation bot, you can easily practice any new material at your own pace.

    Essentially, Babbel does all the difficult leg work for you so you can take advantage of your lunch break to learn German without having to look at textbooks, boring grammar exercises or verb charts.

    You can start learning German as it’s actually spoken and skip the difficult class work that you would inevitably run into in any university course.

    6. italki

    Whenever people tell me that they cannot learn a language because they don’t know anybody who speaks it, I always tell them about italki.

    This is a website where you can hire language tutors that will connect with you over the internet to teach you their mother tongue.

    Not only can you find a teacher that you like, but you can find one that doesn’t empty your wallet either.

    There are hundreds of options for German teachers on the site, most of whom offer a discounted trial lesson so you can “shop around” before settling on a teacher.

    If you’re trying to avoid paying to connect with a formal teacher, you can always just find a language partner and use italki’s messaging system to practice with each other and connect over Skype to practice your speaking ability.

    With italki, you never have to worry about finding someone to talk to in German.

    DW

    7. Deutsche Welle

    Deutsche Welle, a public broadcasting network in Germany, has actually developed a German course that is available completely free on their website.

    This website is perfect for people of all levels who are looking for a different perspective on learning German.

    By selecting your level at the link above, you can get material that is tailored for your level that will help you target the areas in German that you’ll most likely struggle with at each level.

    What better way to start learning German than with an authentic German news station?

    Whenever people tell me that they’re going to start studying German, I get excited about the prospect of having another German speaker in the world.

    The German language is rich both culturally and linguistically and offers a genuinely interesting challenge for those who study it.

    Hopefully, after seeing the plethora of available online sources, you’re convinced that learning German without enrolling in courses at a language school is definitely possible.

    Using just the seven resources above you could reach fluency, but part of the fun of learning a language is experiencing the culture that comes with it.

    So get out there, study German and find more websites. Give yourself the opportunity to grow linguistically and culturally that you would never get in a classroom.

    Viel glück!

    Author: Yassir Sahnoun is a HubSpot certified content strategist, copywriter and polyglot who works with language learning companies. He helps companies attract sales using content strategy, copywriting, blogging, email marketing & more.

    How to Start Thinking in German

    Learn 4 tools and techniques to stop translating in your head and start thinking in German

    Going through German lessons is enough to get by and learn the basics of German, but to truly become fluent you need to be able to think in German. This will allow you to have conversations with ease, read smoothly, and comprehensively understand natives. To do this, you need to go beyond just completing daily or weekly lessons.

    We naturally translate in our heads because it’s viewed as the easiest way to learn the definitions needed when learning a language. This way of learning can actually hinder your skills and fluency later on. If your brain has to make neural connections between the word you’re learning, what it means in your native tongue, and the physical object the connection will not be nearly as strong. When you bypass the original translation between German and your native language then there is a more basic and strong connection between just the German vocabulary word and the tangible object.

    start thinking in German

    In this blog post, you will learn the 4 important techniques to easily and naturally begin to speculate about the daily occurrences in your life. The best part is all of these techniques are supported and can be achieved through GermanPod101.com.

    Create Your Free Lifetime Account and Start Learning the whole German Language from the Beginning!

    1. Surround yourself with German

    Surround Yourself

    By surrounding yourself with German constantly you will completely immerse yourself in the language. Without realizing it you’ll be learning pronunciation, sentence structures, grammar, and new vocabulary. You can play music in the background while you’re cooking or have a German radio station on while you study. Immersion is a key factor with this learning process because it is one of the easiest things to do, but very effective. Even if you are not giving the program your full attention you will be learning.

    One great feature of GermanPod101.com is the endless podcasts that are available to you. You can even download and listen to them on the go. These podcasts are interesting and are perfect for the intention of immersion, they are easy to listen to as background noise and are interesting enough to give your full attention. Many of them contain stories that you follow as you go through the lessons which push you to keep going.

    2. Learn through observation
    learn through observation

    Learning through observation is the most natural way to learn. Observation is how we all learned our native languages as infants and it’s a wonder why we stop learning this way. If you have patience and learn through observation then German words will have their own meanings rather than meanings in reference to your native language. Ideally, you should skip the bilingual dictionary and just buy a dictionary in German.

    GermanPod101.com also offers the materials to learn this way. We have numerous video lessons which present situational usage of each word or phrase instead of just a direct translation. This holds true for many of our videos and how we teach German.

    3. Speak out loud to yourself
    talk to yourself

    Speaking to yourself in German not only gets you in the mindset of German, but also makes you listen to how you speak. It forces you to correct any errors with pronunciation and makes it easy to spot grammar mistakes. When you speak out loud talk about what you did that day and what you plan to do the next day. Your goal is to be the most comfortable speaking out loud and to easily create sentences. Once you feel comfortable talking to yourself start consciously thinking in your head about your daily activities and what is going on around you throughout the day.

    With GermanPod101.com you start speaking right away, not only this, but they have you repeat words and conversations after a native German speaker. This makes your pronunciation very accurate! With this help, you are on the fast path to making clear and complex sentences and then actively thinking about your day.

    4. Practice daily

    If you don’t practice daily then your progress will be greatly slowed. Many people are tempted to take the 20-30 minutes they should be practicing a day and practice 120 in one day and skip the other days. This isn’t nearly as effective because everyday you practice you are reinforcing the skills and knowledge you have learned. If you practice all in one day you don’t retain the information because the brain can realistically only focus for 30 minutes at most. If you’re studying for 120 minutes on the same subject little of the information will be absorbed. Studying everyday allows you to review material that you went over previous days and absorb a small amount of information at a time.

    It’s tough to find motivation to study everyday, but GermanPod101.com can help. It’s easy to stay motivated with GermanPod101.com because we give you a set learning path, with this path we show how much progress you’ve made. This makes you stick to your goals and keep going!

    Conclusion

    Following the steps and having patience is the hardest part to achieving your goals, it’s not easy learning a new language. You are essentially teaching your brain to categorize the world in a completely new way. Stick with it and you can do it just remember the 4 tools I taught you today! With them, conversations, reading, and understanding will become much easier. The most important thing to remember is to use the tools that GermanPod101.com provides and you will be on your way to being fluent!

    Learn German With GermanPod101 Today!

    3 Reasons Why Successful Students Learn German In the Car

    Not only is it possible to learn German in your car, there are 3 great benefits that will help you master the language faster and with less effort.

    With everyone so pressed for time these days, it might seem like a daydream to believe that you could learn German in your car—but it’s not! Thanks to a wide range of new technologies and resources, learning a language in your car is easier than ever. Not only is it easy to learn a language while driving, there are actually a number of benefits, especially if the lessons are part of a structured learning program like GermanPod101. Here are three specific benefits to learning German or any other new language in your car.

    3 reasons why successful students learn german in the car

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    1. Transform Downtime into Progress

    How much time do you spend commuting to and from work? Learning a language in your car transforms your commute time into tangible progress towards your dream. So instead of being stressed over how much time you are “wasting” on errands and daily commutes, you can decompress and have some fun while you learn German in your car!

    2. Daily Exposure Leads to Passive Learning

    Practice makes perfect and learning a new language is no different. The daily exposure you get when you learn German while driving helps improve listening comprehension, pronunciation, and of course helps build vocabulary and improve grammar. Don’t worry: You don’t need to memorize everything as you listen in German while driving. Just having continuous exposure to a foreign language helps you improve your vocabulary, learn faster, and ultimately retain more through passive learning.


    3. Learning While Driving is Fun

    Learning a new language does require a serious commitment, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be fun! When you learn German in your car, you get to take some time away from the PC or smartphone and immerse yourself in the language instead of just “studying” it.

    Plus, there are a number of “fun” activities that you can do and still learn in your car, such as:
    - Singing Along with German Songs
    - Playing Word Games or Trivia
    - Just Listening Along and Seeing How Much You Can Pick Up and Understand

    Want to Learn How to Get Angry in German? Pick-Up Lines? Our Vocabulary Lists are Made for You!

    Yes, you can learn a language while driving and have loads of fun doing it. Now let’s take a look at some specific things you can listen to while driving to help you learn a new language.

    BONUS: 3 Ways to Learn German in Your Car

    -Listen to Podcasts: Typically designed to focus on one topic or lesson, podcasts are a great way to learn a language while driving. Unfortunately, podcasts are rarely at the same listening/comprehension level as the language learner so listeners may not get their full value. But at GermanPod101, our podcasts are created for every skill level so you don’t waste any time on material that isn’t relevant or suited to your exact needs.

    -Sing Along to German Songs: Remember, just immersing yourself in a language can create passive learning and improve your pronunciation. Plus, with GermanPod101, you can sing along and memorize the lyrics, and then look the words up and add them to your personal dictionary.

    -Playing Word Games or Trivia: There are audio games available online that you can download to any media device and listen to on your commute. Although we recommend this option for more advanced users, games are a fun and productive way to learn German in your car because they require listening and comprehension skills.

    Get the Free eBook of Your Choice to Start Learning One of our 34 Languages

    You won’t recognize or understand every word you hear in a German song, podcast, or game—but that’s ok. The daily repetition and immersion in the language leads to passive learning that gradually increases your knowledge of vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation. And the greater your foundation in grammar and vocabulary, the more you’ll understand and learn from the audio lessons, podcasts, or whatever you listen to while learning German in your car.

    Yes, you can learn German while driving because it leads to passive learning via daily immersion in the language. Although you may not understand all or even most of what you hear at first, the exposure helps improve pronunciation, vocabulary, and even grammar over time. Learning a language while driving also helps transform your commute into exciting “exotic adventures” that secretly teach you German in the process. Podcasts, songs, and even games can all help you learn German in your car while eliminating the “boring commute” in the process!

    At GermanPod101, we have more than 2500+ HD audio lessons and podcasts for every skill level that you can download and use to learn German while driving!
    So don’t forget to sign up for a Free Lifetime Account on GermanPod101.com to access tons of FREE lessons and features to become fluent in German!

    4 Reasons Why German Slang Words Will Make You Fluent

    Learn 4 honest reasons you need German slang words and why they are so vital to truly learning and mastering the language.

    Teachers may normally cringe at the thought of their students learning German slang words. After all, slang words and phrases are typically defined as being grammatically incorrect. So why would your teacher want you to spend time learning the “wrong way” to speak German? Here are 4 of the top reasons why you should study slang words and expressions when learning German or any new language.

    reasons to learn german slang words

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    1. Native Speakers Use Slang Expressions in Everyday Conversation

    If you are going to study a foreign language and plan to use it to speak with native speakers, then you have to learn slang words and expressions. Otherwise, just using formal expressions and grammar may alienate you from native speakers and make it more difficult to establish a real connection. So it is best to at least learn some common slang words and expressions if you’re planning to meet or speak socially with someone.

    2. Slang Words Are Used All Throughout German Culture

    If you turn on any popular German TV show, listen to any song, or watch any movie, you are quickly going to see the value of learning German slang phrases. Just like everyday conversations between native speakers, German culture is filled with slang phrases and expressions. Without at least some knowledge of the more common slang phrases, popular culture and most conversations will be very confusing and potentially alienating.

    Want to Amaze Native Speaker? Be a Good Lover? Our Vocabulary Lists are Made for You!

    3. Slang Expressions Help You Better Express Your True Thoughts and Feelings

    Only relying on formal grammar and vocabulary is very limiting, especially in social situations. Just like in your native language, using the appropriate German slang words can help you express a broader range of emotions, thoughts, and feelings.

    4. Proper Use of Slang Makes You Sound More Natural

    We’ve all met foreigners who technically used formal language perfectly but still sounded odd and well….foreign. But when you use the right slang words and expressions, you will sound more natural and like a true native speaker. If you notice, even most politicians include a sprinkling of slang expressions and words throughout their speeches to help them sound more natural and to better connect with the audience.

    The Dark Side of Slang Expressions

    Learning German slang words can indeed help you sound more natural, better understand the people and culture, and make integration much easier. However, there is a dark side: using the wrong slang expressions can also make you look foolish, uneducated, and potentially disrespectful.

    But how do you know which slang words or phrases to use and when?

    The truth is that you can’t learn the most modern and appropriate slang words in textbooks or formal classroom settings. By the time the information gets incorporated into a formal curriculum, it’s already outdated and no longer in use by actual German people. And while you can learn current slang expressions from German TV shows, movies, songs, and games, you may not understand the context. If that happens, you may use the right German slang words but in the wrong situation and still look like a fool or possibly even offend someone.

    Step out from the darkness and Get Your FREE PDF eBook to Start Learning German!

    So where can you learn current slang expressions and the right context in which to use them?

    At GermanPod101, native speaking instructors create audio and video lessons that can include slang expressions and words. Our instructors provide context and examples for all the German slang words used in any lesson to make sure students understand the right time and place to use them.

    German slang words and expressions may be grammatically incorrect but they are vital to truly understanding and immersing yourself in the culture. In fact, it will be very difficult to fully understand any movie, TV show, song, game, or even 1-on-1 conversation without knowing a few of the more common slang expressions.

    However, it is important to learn the proper context and use of even popular slang expressions or you may come across as confusing, disrespectful, or uneducated.
    At GermanPod101, you’ll learn how to use slang phrases and words to draw the right attention and avoid these problems.

    Don’t forget to sign up for a Free Lifetime Account on GermanPod101.com to access tons of FREE lessons and features to become fluent in German!

    How to Learn German in Your Car?

    How to Learn German in Your Car? Learn language in car

    Stuck in traffic? Losing time in your car? Have you ever felt that in all this wasted time, you could have watched the 750 episodes of One Piece, finished the last Super Mario ten times, or even better…you could have learned German? Between family, friends and work, in addition to this time-consuming commute, it can become difficult to find time to properly learn German.

    Fortunately, every problem has a solution, and what could be a better solution than turning that commute time into learning time? Stop passing the time mindlessly listening to the radio and try some of our best tips for mastering German in your car!

    https://media.giphy.com/media/3o6Mb2Qgu6RbzYlByU/giphy.gif

    Click Here To Start Learning German Right Now!

    You can learn German in your car, hands free
    While driving, it’s important that you keep your focus on the road, so this is why our top tips won’t require you to use your hands!

    Listening to German audio content in the car is a good way to learn
    This is because it is a fun and efficient way to learn. With GermanPod101.com podcasts, you will be able to discover German culture through topics about everyday life. Instead of the radio, listen to a German podcast adapted to your level, from Absolute Beginner to Advanced, and you will make progress sooner that you would expect!

    https://media.giphy.com/media/pXsF2CgWoiel2/giphy.gif

    You can listen to German music in the car
    Did you know that you can learn German by singing while driving? Listen to songs from cartoon or drama and try to identify some words you learned.

    Challenge yourself! Use the German you’ve studied up to this point and see how much you understand! Making the jump to real-life German is a scary one, but friendly children’s songs are a great place to start!

    https://media.giphy.com/media/gPPA7RUH34HSg/giphy.gif

    Click Here To Sign Up For A FREE Lifetime Account!

    You can learn alone in your car
    When you’re driving alone, you can be as loud as you want – there is nothing better for remembering your German lessons than repeating loudly, again and again. Next time you see a driver who seems to be talking alone, you will know he or she is just learning German!

    https://media.giphy.com/media/uSXTDFYDWpelW/giphy.gif

    You can learn through repetition with your passengers
    If there are passengers in the car, it can be more stimulating to learn together. You can set a role play with German dialogues. With GermanPod101.com, you can download all the lessons transcript including the dialogues, as a PDF. Print it out and have some fun speaking in German!

    One of the passengers can answer the quiz available on each of our lessons, while another can correct that person. Listening to someone at a more advanced level of German or a better accent is positive and helps you improve.

    You can learn German offline
    Do you have a poor connection or are unable to use the Internet? It’s not a problem for learning German! Before you start your commute, use our App to download the lessons you want to study and the podcast you want to listen to in your car, and you will be able to enjoy your lessons offline. Entering a tunnel won’t be a problem anymore. What a pleasure to listen to audio content without having the host freezing every 5 seconds!

    https://media.giphy.com/media/yjos61Qgsy17q/giphy.gif

    Click here to download the App and learn offline!

    You can learn every day at your own pace
    One of the best approaches for learning a language is little by little and often. It’s not efficient to take in a huge amount of information at one time. What you need is to study on a regular basis – a little bit of German every day. You commute several days a week, and that is all time you can take advantage of!

    You have the freedom to choose the lessons and podcasts you want to focus on, at your own rhythm. You may want to do a little revision or discover how to talk about a new topic. And if you’re wondering what to learn next, you can use the new Learning Paths, which is our customized pathway feature that gives you a step-by-step way to learn German without getting lost!

    https://media.giphy.com/media/rdma0nDFZMR32/giphy.gif

    Click here to access Learning Paths at GermanPod101!

    If you don’t have a car and commute by another method, these tips are still valid! Learning German is no longer limited to the classroom or your house; there are so many benefits to learning in your car or elsewhere. Reaching a conversational level will take you less time than you could ever have imagined! Don’t forget to sign up for your Free Lifetime Account and enjoy our content!

    Top 10 Lines You Need for Introducing Yourself in German

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    Click here to listen how to pronounce those phrases!

  • Mein Name ist Anna.
    My name is Anna.

  • Ich komme aus Deutschland.
    I’m from Germany.

  • Ich lebe in Berlin.
    I live in Berlin.

  • Ich lerne seit einem Jahr Deutsch.
    I’ve been learning German for a year.

  • Ich lerne Deutsch auf GermanPod101.com.
    I’m learning German at GermanPod101.com.

  • Hallo, es ist schön, Sie kennenzulernen.
    Hello, it’s nice to meet you.

  • Ich bin 27 Jahre alt.
    I’m 27 years old.

  • Ich bin Lehrer.
    I’m a teacher.

  • Eines meiner Hobbys ist Lesen.
    One of my hobbies is reading.

  • Ich höre gerne Musik.
    I enjoy listening to music.

    Make friends? Want to impress native speakers?
    Learn German with our other vocabulary lists!

  • 10 Monthly Goals to become fluent in German

    https://s3.amazonaws.com/cdn.innovativelanguage.com/sns/em/blog/2016/05_May/monthly_goal.png

    Hey German Learner!

    Shortcuts for learning and tips to remember German words are useful but it’s even also important to fix objectives to reach every month! What Is Your Language Learning Goal for the Month?
    In your journey to become fluent and conversational here are 10 monthly goals you can go after!

    Click Here To Start Learning German Right Now!

    1) I’ll finish Survival Phrases series on GermanPod101.com by listening to two lesson a day.

    2) I’ll give a 3 minute introductory speech in German to my German friends.

    3) I’ll finish reading one German book by reading 10 pages a day.

    4) I’ll pass my German test.

    5) I’ll write 10 postcards in German to my German friends.

    6) I’ll memorize 5 German songs.

    7) I’ll finish memorizing 350 words with Flashcards on GermanPod101.com.

    8 ) I’ll fully understand one German movie by watching it every day.

    9) I’ll learn how to talk about past, present and future events.

    10) I’ll master 150 words by memorizing 5 words a day.

    No money, no credit card required, just you and the ton of lessons!

    If you follow those monthly goals, you will be sure to make some amazing progress. And remember, if you’re really interested in getting on the fast-track to fluency, sign up for a FREE lifetime account at GermanPod101.com!

    How to be a Good Lover in Germany

    https://img15.hostingpics.net/pics/518029universal.png

    Click here to listen how to pronounce those lovely words!

    - Ich liebe dich.
    I love you.

    - Du bedeutest mir sehr viel.
    You mean so much to me.

    - Möchtest du mein Valentin sein?
    Will you be my Valentine?

    - Sie sind so schön.
    You’re so beautiful.

    - Du bist mehr als nur ein Freund für mich.
    I think of you as more than a friend.

    - Hundert Herzen wären zu wenige, um all meine Liebe zu dir zu tragen.
    A hundred hearts would be too few to carry all my love for you.

    - Liebe ist nur Liebe. Es kann niemals erklärt werden.
    Love is just love. It can never be explained.

    - Du bist so schön.
    You’re so handsome.

    - Ich bin in dich verknallt.
    I’ve got a crush on you.

    - Du machst mich zu einem besseren Menschen.
    You make me want to be a better man.

    - Lasse deine Handlungen in der Liebe geschehen.
    Let all that you do be done in love.

    - Du bist mein Sonnenschein, meine Liebe.
    You are my sunshine, my love.

    - Worte können meine Liebe zu dir nicht beschreiben.
    Words can’t describe my love for you.

    - Wir waren füreinander bestimmt.
    We were meant to be together.

    - Solltest du - während du diese Zeilen liest - über jemanden nachdenken, bist du auf jeden Fall verliebt.
    If you were thinking about someone while reading this, you’re definitely in love.

    Break up? Want to impress friends? Learn German with our other vocabulary lists!

    Bier

    The picture of the beer drinking Germans is well used abroad. Indeed the cliche of a nation of beer drinkers is based on real facts. With a consumption of more than 110 liters per head Germany holds the second position in Europe. Only Czech people drink more.
    But not only the consumption of beer in Germany is high, but also is the assortment of different kinds. Estimations say there are more than 5000 different beers.


    Of course you won’t find all of them on the shelves in the supermarkets. Many beers come from small breweries which sell their products regional or direct to the customers. Nevertheless there is an impressive assortment in a German drinks cash-and-carry. In addition to regional and national kinds of beer you will find many international ones. Popular brands are for example Miller and Heineken. With this huge number of beers it is not easy to keep track of all of them.


    The most important national kinds are pilsner, wheat beer, lager, dark beer and bock beer. In addition there are regional beers like “Alt” from the Niederrhein, “Kölsch” from Cologne and “Berliner Weiße” from Berlin. Some regional kinds of beer have loyal devotees. In the region between the big cities Düsseldorf and Cologne people are friendly arguing on the topic who enjoys the more tastefull beer. People from Düsseldorf swear by their “Alt”, people from Cologne defend their “Kölsch” emphatically. A special position on the beer market is held by the federal state of Bavaria. More than 50 percent of all German breweries are located here. Nearly every hamlet has its own small brewery.