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M: Hello and welcome to German Survival Phrases brought to you by germanpod101.com, this course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Germany. You will be surprised at how far a little German will go. Now before we jump in, remember to stop by germanpod101.com and there you will find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment.
F: German Survival Phrases. Lesson 49, Using German to Get Medical Help.
M: In today’s lesson, we will introduce you to some phrases useful in the case you need medical assistance. When traveling, sometimes the body takes a little time to adjust and the immune system is no different. So today, we will go over some phrases that will help get you to a location where you can get medical assistance. We will start with the phrase, please take me to the hospital. In German, please take me to the hospital is [Bringen Sie mich bitte ins Krankenhaus] Let’s break down this phrase by syllable and hear it one more time [Bringen Sie mich bitte ins Krankenhaus] The first word is [Bringen] which means take. It’s the third plural person of the verb [bringen] to take using the formal level of speech. Let’s break this word down and hear it once more [bringen] This is followed by [Sie] which means you in the formal way of speech. Let’s hear it one more time [Sie] Next is [mich] which in German means me. Reflexive pronoun for a singular person. Let’s listen to it once again [mich] Then we have [bitte] which you know very well. It means please. So to recap here, we have [bringen Sie mich bitte] Literally this means please take me. The first word [ins] is the short form for [in das] This literally means into the, preposition in and article [das] the for neutral nouns are melt together. Let’s break it down here this word once more [ins] Finally we have [ins Krankenhaus] which means hospital. Let’s break this word down by syllable [ins Krankenhaus] Now let’s hear it one more time [ins Krankenhaus] Altogether we have [Bringen Sie mich bitte ins Krankenhaus] Literally this means take you me please into the hospital and it’s translated as please take me to the hospital. Now if you need to see a doctor and would like someone to take you, you can use the following phrase. Please take me to the doctor which is [Bringen Sie mich bitte zum Arzt] Let’s break down this phrase by syllable and hear it one more time [Bringen Sie mich bitte zum Arzt] So as you can see, this phrase is very similar to the previous one. You have [Bringen Sie mich bitte] please take me and then [zum Arzt] which literally means to the doctor. So in this phrase, the only thing that changes is [zum Arzt] in place of [ins Krankenhaus] Altogether we have [Bringen Sie mich bitte ins Krankenhaus] Another helpful phrase is [Ich brauche einen Arzt] which means I need a doctor. You can use this phrase when you tell other people that you need to see a doctor. The first word [Ich] means I [Ich] The next word [brauche] need is the first singular person of the verb [brauchen] to need. Let’s break it down by syllable and hear it once more [brauche] This is followed by [einen] a, singular indefinite article for masculine nouns [einen] Lastly we have [Arzt] which means doctor. So altogether we have [Ich brauche einen Arzt] Literally this means, I need a doctor. If things aren’t too bad, perhaps you only need to get to a pharmacy. In German, I need a pharmacy is [Ich muss zur Apotheke] Let’s break it down by syllable [Ich muss zur Apotheke] Now let’s hear it once again [Ich muss zur Apotheke] The first word is [Ich] and it means I. Let’s hear it once again [ich] It’s followed by [muss] which can be translated as have to. It’s the first singular person form of the verb [müssen] have got to. Let’s break it down by syllable and hear it one more time [muss] After that you have [zur] which literally means to the [zur] Again it’s the short form for [zu der] to the, a mixture of preposition [zu] to and article [der] the for feminine nouns. Finally you have [Apotheke] pharmacy [Apotheke] And altogether [Ich muss zur Apotheke] Literally this means I have to the pharmacy but we translate it as I need a pharmacy. Be careful because in Germany, for most medicines, you will need the medical prescription. So make sure to see a doctor who will give you the right prescription in order to buy medicines at the pharmacy. Then you might be asked [Haben Sie ein Rezept] Do you have a medical prescription. Let’s break it down by syllable [Haben Sie ein Rezept] Now hear it once more [Haben Sie ein Rezept] If you just need something that helps against coughing or rhinitis, they will sell you some products over-the-counter and just for insurance purposes, we should cover one more phrase before wrapping up this lesson. It’s the phrase, please call an ambulance which is [Rufen Sie bitte einen Krankenwagen] Let’s break it down by syllable [Rufen Sie bitte einen Krankenwagen] Now let’s hear it once again [Rufen Sie bitte einen Krankenwagen] The first word [rufen] means call. Let’s break down this word and hear it one more time [rufen] This is followed by [Sie] you [Sie] The first two words [Rufen Sie] together are used in the formal level of speech. Next is the word you are very familiar with [bitte] please [bitte] and finally we have the words [einen Krankenwagen] which means an ambulance. Let’s break it down by syllable [einen Krankenwagen] Now let’s hear it one more time [einen Krankenwagen] So altogether we have [Rufen Sie einen Krankenwagen] Literally this means call you please an ambulance but we translate it as please call an ambulance. Next lesson, we will continue medical issues as we are going to cover how to express your symptoms to a doctor or pharmacist.
Okay to close our today’s lesson, we would like you to practice what you’ve just learned. I will provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you are responsible for shouting it out aloud. You have a few seconds before I give you the answer. So [Viel Glück] which means good luck in German.
Please take me to the hospital [Bringen Sie mich bitte ins Krankenhaus] Please take me to the doctor [Bringen Sie mich zum Arzt] I need a doctor [Ich brauche einen Arzt] I need a pharmacy [Ich muss zur Apotheke] Do you have a medical prescription [Haben Sie ein Rezept] Please call an ambulance [Rufen Sie bitte einen Krankenwagen]
That’s going to do it for today.

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GermanPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Have you ever needed to purchase medicine in a foreign country?

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GermanPod101.com
Tuesday at 12:50 am
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Hello Amadou,


Thank you very much for your question! :smile:

"Ich brauche eine Apotheke" would sound a bit strange to native Germans. Instead you could say "Ich suche eine Apotheke" or "Ich bin auf der Suche nach einer Apotheke", both sentences mean "I am looking/searching for an pharmacy". I hope this helps!


Please let us know if you have any questions.


Kind regards,


Albert

Team GermanPod101.com

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Amadou LY
Wednesday at 4:09 pm
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Would it be correct to say: Ich brauche einen Apotheke.

Because to me Ich muss Zur Apotheke sound like I have to go the pharmacy vs I need a pharmacy.

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Germanpod101
Tuesday at 8:48 am
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Hi Dot,


Thank you for the comment.

Well, "Arzt" is the colloquial term of "Doktor".

Doktor (female: Doktorin, derives from Latin. "Doktor" means also Ph.D.


I hope this helps.


Best

Jennifer

Team Germanpod101.com

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Dot
Friday at 3:57 am
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I am always curious how English got so far from German when they are so similar.

What does Krank directly translate to?

How did doctor (which sounds German to English speaking ears) come from Arzt, which sounds more like art?

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GermanPod101.com
Thursday at 12:38 pm
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Hi Nabila,


Thank you very much for your comment!


You are right that "zur" is the shortened version of "zu der". And also, that "der" is the masculine article.


However, there are four cases in German grammar (nominative, accusative, genitive and dative) and in both genitive and dative cases, the feminine article "die" changes to "der". In the example "Ich muss zur Apotheke", "Apotheke" is in the dative case, so "Ich muss zu der (zur) Apotheke" is correct.


I hope this helps!


Vielen Dank!


Clara

Team GermanPod101.com

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GermanPod101.com
Friday at 2:59 pm
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Hi mamdouh,


Thank you for posting :heart::thumbsup:


Cheers,

Laura

Team GermanPod101.com

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Nabila
Friday at 12:34 am
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zur = zu + der .... der is the article for masculine nouns, right? I think you're saying feminine nouns article. A little confusion!?

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mamdouh
Thursday at 10:26 pm
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this is really great :thumbsup:

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GermanPod101.com
Friday at 12:19 pm
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Hi gangsta,


Thank you for your comment! I hope you bought the right medicine in the end.


Katrin

Team GermanPod101.com

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gangsta
Wednesday at 4:32 pm
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Yeah, Canada once. Was so difficult trying to understand what they were talking aboot.