Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

M: Hello and welcome to German Survival Phrases brought to you by germanpod101.com, this course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Germany. You will be surprised at how far a little German will go. Now before we jump in, remember to stop by germanpod101.com and there you will find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment.
F: German Survival Phrases. Lesson 48, German for Getting Help in Germany.
M: In today’s lesson, we will introduce you to some phrases that hopefully you won’t have to use. When traveling to Germany, while the threat of physical violence is not prevalent, one should always be careful. In addition, this phrase is not limited to threatening situations but can also be used in the unfortunate event that you or someone around you is in the need of immediate assistance. Today we will learn how to call for help. In German, help is [Hilfe] Literally this means help. There is another way to call for help and it’s [Hilf mir] Literally this means help me. If you need to call the police, shout [Polizei] Literally this means police. Even if everyone wishes that nothing bad or dangerous happens while on holiday in Germany, it’s better if you know some important useful phrases to use in case of emergency. Very similar to [Hilf mir] is the phrase [Kann mir jemand helfen] The first word [Kann] means be able to. Let’s hear it once more [Kann] It’s followed by [mir] which in English means me [mir]. Then you have [jemand] which in German means someone, an indefinite pronoun. Let’s break down this word by syllable and hear it one more time [jemand] Finally we have [helfen] to help. Let’s break down this word and hear it one more time [helfen] So altogether we have [Kann mir jemand helfen] which literally means, can me someone help but we translate it as someone help me. The phone number for the police in Germany is 110. You can easily call it from a public phone or a cell phone. So make sure to rent a mobile when you are in Germany. Otherwise make sure that in an emergency situation, you know how to ask for a public phone. To ask for a public phone, you can say [Wo ist ein öffentliches Telefon] where is a public phone. Please remember that those phones usually are around train stations, larger bus stops, in and around shopping malls and shopping streets.
Okay to close our today’s lesson, we would like you to practice what you’ve just learned. I will provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you are responsible for shouting it out aloud. You have a few seconds before I give you the answer. So [Viel Glück] which means good luck in German.
Help [Hilfe] Help me [Hilf mir] Someone help me [Kann mir jemand helfen]. That’s going to do it for today.

3 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters.

user profile picture
GermanPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

These phrases are crucial to know! Don't miss 'em!

user profile picture
GermanPod101.com
Tuesday at 12:45 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Amadou,


Thank you very much for you comment! We are very sorry for the delayed response.

The difference in using "einen/keinen" and "eine/keine" is that these words have to be chosen accordingly to the noun, which can stand in different cases (Masculine, Feminine, Neuter in their related Nominative/Genitive/Dative/Accusative cases)


For example:


Hast du eine Tochter? (Do you have a daughter) - Nein, ich habe keine Tochter (No, I don't have a daughter).

Hast du einen Fisch? (Do you have a fish) - Nein, ich habe keinen Fisch (No, I don't have a fish).


In above case "Tochter" is a feminine noun and in nominative case, that's why "eine" is used. But "Fisch" is a masculine noun and also stands in nominative case, which is the reason why "einen" and therefore "keinen" is used.


I hope this helps. If you need more explanations or have any questions please let us know.


Kind regards,


Albert

Team GermanPod101.com

user profile picture
Amadou LY
Monday at 2:53 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I have issue with einen or keinen. I know the concept. Kein and Ein for masculin nouns and Keine and Eine for feminin nouns.

I thought you use einen when the nouns starts with a vowel like einen Apfel. But I get confused by einen followed by another nouns that don't start with that pattern example.keinen wein, keinen Fisch

Can you explain that a little, please