Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Gina: Hi everyone, I’m Gina! Welcome back to GermanPod101.com. This is Absolute Beginner Season 3, Lesson 15; Who are You Making Plans with in German?
Frank: And I’m Frank!
Gina: In this lesson, you'll learn about the future tense.
Frank: This conversation takes place at school, after classes.
Gina: The conversation is between Kate and Jens, two students.
Frank: The speakers are classmates. So, they’ll be using informal German.
DIALOGUE
Kate: So, Jens, was machst du jetzt?
Jens: Ich fahre nach Hause und esse etwas. Ich habe Hunger.
Kate: Ich auch. Hast du heute Abend schon etwas vor?
Jens: Ich? Lernen.
Kate: Bäh! Langweilig! Ich werde heute Abend ausgehen. Kommst du mit?
Jens: Wohin gehst du?
Kate: Ein Freund von mir, Simon, wird heute im "International Pub" Jazz spielen. Danach werden wir zusammen etwas trinken.
Jens: Klingt gut. Ich komme mit.
Gina: Let's hear the conversation one time slowly.
Kate: So, Jens, was machst du jetzt?
Jens: Ich fahre nach Hause und esse etwas. Ich habe Hunger.
Kate: Ich auch. Hast du heute Abend schon etwas vor?
Jens: Ich? Lernen.
Kate: Bäh! Langweilig! Ich werde heute Abend ausgehen. Kommst du mit?
Jens: Wohin gehst du?
Kate: Ein Freund von mir, Simon, wird heute im "International Pub" Jazz spielen. Danach werden wir zusammen etwas trinken.
Jens: Klingt gut. Ich komme mit.
Gina: Now, let's hear it with English translation.
Kate: So, Jens, was machst du jetzt?
Gina: So, Jens, what are you doing now?
Jens: Ich fahre nach Hause und esse etwas. Ich habe Hunger.
Gina: I'm going home and eating something. I'm hungry.
Kate: Ich auch. Hast du heute Abend schon etwas vor?
Gina: Me too. Do you have plans for tonight?
Jens: Ich? Lernen.
Gina: Me? Studying.
Kate: Bäh! Langweilig! Ich werde heute Abend ausgehen. Kommst du mit?
Gina: Bah! Boring! I'm going out tonight. Are you coming?
Jens: Wohin gehst du?
Gina: Where are you going?
Kate: Ein Freund von mir, Simon, wird heute im "International Pub" Jazz spielen. Danach werden wir zusammen etwas trinken.
Gina: A friend of mine, Simon, will play at the International Pub tonight. We'll have a drink together.
Jens: Klingt gut. Ich komme mit.
Gina: Sounds good. I'm coming.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Gina: What does ‘going out’ entail for Germans?
Frank: One thing I can tell you is that because of the climate, Germans are a lot less likely to go outside than people from warmer countries. This is just a trend that has developed over history.
Gina: Right. People usually prefer to meet indoors, for example at somebody's place, at a restaurant, Cafe, at the cinema or a theater.
Frank: One nice outdoor activity during these cold months, is to visit the Weihnachtsmärkte, Germany's Christmas markets.
Gina: During summertime however, a popular pastime is to sit outside at cafes or restaurants in the afternoon or at night.
Frank: Going out in Germany is pretty fun!
Gina: It sounds like it!
VOCAB LIST
Frank: Freund [natural native speed]
Gina: friend
Frank: Freund [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: Freund [natural native speed]
Frank: jetzt [natural native speed]
Gina: now
Frank: jetzt [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: jetzt [natural native speed]
Frank: spielen [natural native speed]
Gina: to play
Frank: spielen [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: spielen [natural native speed]
Frank: klingen [natural native speed]
Gina: to sound
Frank: klingen [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: klingen [natural native speed]
Frank: machen [natural native speed]
Gina: to make, to do
Frank: machen [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: machen [natural native speed]
Frank: fahren [natural native speed]
Gina: to drive, to ride a vehicle as a passenger, to go (but not by foot)
Frank: fahren [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: fahren [natural native speed]
Frank: vorhaben [natural native speed]
Gina: to plan, to intend
Frank: vorhaben [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: vorhaben [natural native speed]
Frank: wohin [natural native speed]
Gina: where to
Frank: wohin [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: wohin [natural native speed]
Frank: heute [natural native speed]
Gina: today
Frank: heute [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: heute [natural native speed]
Frank: Haus [natural native speed]
Gina: house
Frank: Haus [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: Haus [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Gina: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Frank: The first phrase we’ll look at is nach Hause.
Gina: “going home.” It’s a combination of
Frank: nach.
Gina: “to”, and
Frank: Haus
Gina: “house” which implies your own house, or your home.
Frank: Interestingly, the word Hause ending in the letter “e” is a relic of old times, when certain prepositions required words to add an “e”. This is no longer done today, but it still remains in the expression nach Hause.
Gina: So, it is actually an expression from old German.
Frank: That’s right, Gina. Okay, next up is vorhaben
Gina: Which is a verb meaning "to plan," "to have a plan," "to have in mind," or "to intend.
Frank: To break this word down, vor means "forward" or "in front of," and haben means "to have"
Gina: So it literally means "to have in front of."
Frank: The verb haben is also used with the noun Pläne, meaning "plans", to make the phrase Pläne haben.
Gina: "to have plans"
Frank: For example, I could ask you Hast du Pläne?
Gina: "Do you have plans?"
Frank: That’s right. Finally, let’s move on to the expression Klingt gut.
Gina: Meaning “sounds good”.
Frank: You can say klingt gut or you can say das klingt gut, meaning “that sounds good”.
Gina: You can use this to agree to plans or a suggestion, especially in colloquial speech between friends arranging a meeting, or in many other situations.
Frank: There's also the opposite expression, das klingt nicht gut.
Gina: Which means "that doesn't sound good."
Frank: It's used more often as an expression to show sympathy when you hear some bad news, rather than to disagree with a suggestion.
Gina: That’s interesting! Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Gina: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use the future tense.
Frank: The first thing to know is that there are different ways of forming the future tense in German.
Gina: The first one, listeners, is one you already know how to do, without knowing!
Frank: Richtig! It’s the future tense that's formed with present tense conjugations.
Gina: In practice, though, the present tense is much more frequent than the future in German to refer to the future, especially if there's an adverb in the sentence pointing to the future.
Frank: Yes, for example, Ich fahre nächstes Jahr in den Urlaub.
Gina: “I’m going on holiday next year.”
Frank: The future tense can also be formed using the auxiliary werden, which in this case means “will”, and the infinitive of the verb. Werden is conjugated similarly to a vowel-changing verb.
Gina: Okay, let’s give our listeners a quick run-down on the conjugations of this verb.
Frank: ich werde
Gina: “I will”
Frank: du wirst
Gina: “you will”
Frank: er wird
Gina: “he will”
Frank: sie wird
Gina: “she will”
Frank: es wird
Gina: “it will”
Frank: wir werden
Gina: “we will”
Frank: ihr werdet
Gina: "You all will"
Frank: Sie werden
Gina: “they will”.
Frank: The future tense is easier than the present tense.
Gina: Yes. That’s because all verbs are regular, and separable verbs are never separated in the future tense.
Frank: But, whenever there's more than one verb in a sentence, the second verb must be placed at the very end of the sentence. Also remember that, as a verb, werden is defined as “to become”.
Gina: The meaning is more like “will”, but the forms need to go together with the verb for the future activity in order to make sense.
Frank: That’s right, Gina!
Gina: Okay. Can you give us some examples using the future tense?
Frank: Sure! Er wird es verstehen.
Gina: “He will understand it.”
Frank: Was wirst du in Deutschland machen?
Gina: “What will you do in Germany?”
Frank: Ich werde viel Bier trinken.
Gina: “I will drink a lot of beer.”
Frank: Wirst du in der Stadt bummeln?
Gina: “Will you go for a stroll in town?” or “Are you going for a stroll in town?” Notice how English can form the future tense in a couple of different ways as well.
Frank: English and German are in some ways comparable, as they both have Germanic roots.
Gina: Yes, the main difference is the word order, especially when more than one verb in the sentence is present!
Frank: This rule applies to all time tenses too - the second verb in German always goes to the end of the sentence.
Gina: We’ve included a lot more examples in the lesson notes, listeners, so please check them out.
Frank: Yes, do check them out as they include more detailed explanations about the future tense with sample sentences on how to use it too.

Outro

Gina: And that just about does it for this lesson! Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time.
Frank: Bis bald!
Gina: Bye!

5 Comments

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GermanPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hello Listeners, let's practice the future tense in German!

Team GermanPod101.com
Thursday at 1:30 pm
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Hallo Roman,


Super! :smile::thumbsup:


Vielen Dank!


Clara

Team GermanPod101.com

Roman
Thursday at 9:30 pm
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Guten Tag. Ich werde / du wirst / er wird / wir werden / ihr werdet / Sie werden ... schreiben.

GermanPod101.comVerified
Monday at 2:32 pm
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Hi Ronn,


It's all fine and good Germann, well done!


Kind Regards,

Katrin

Team GermanPod101.com

Ronn
Friday at 2:29 am
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Beispiele


Nächste Woche fahre ich nach Rügen.

Nächste Woche werde ich nach Rügen fahren.


Im Oktober werde ich nach Dresden fliegen, um Deutsch zu lernen.

Ich werde zwei Wochen da sein.


Ich hoffe, dass alle Sätze richtig sind.