Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Chuck: Chuck here, Upper-Beginner Season 2, Lesson 6 - Let's dispense with the German formalities. Hello, and welcome back to GermanPod101.com, the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn German. I’m joined in the studio by.
Judith: Hello everyone, Judith here.
Chuck: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to have a language exchange in German.
Judith: This conversation takes place at a café.
Chuck: The conversation is between Paul Martins and Sandra [Käufer], his language exchange partner.
Judith: The speakers are meeting for the first time, therefore they will start out speaking formal German. Later in the dialogue, they will switch to informal German.
Chuck: Let`s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Sandra Käufer: Ist hier noch frei?
Paul Martens: Ähm, nein, tut mir leid, ich warte auf meine Tandempartnerin...
Sandra Käufer: Ich bin die Tandempartnerin! Sie sind doch Paul Martens, oder?
Paul Martens: Ja. Können wir uns nicht duzen?
Sandra Käufer: Okay. Also dann "du".
Paul: Wie geht es dir, Sandra?
Sandra: Gut, danke. Also, wie sollen wir das machen?
Paul: Hmm, sprechen wir eine halbe Stunde Deutsch und eine halbe Stunde Englisch?
Sandra: Klingt gut. Fangen wir auf Deutsch an?
Paul: Ja. Kann ich dich zunächst mal etwas fragen?
Sandra: Natürlich.
Paul: Also, die Leute gucken mich manchmal so komisch an wenn ich frage, ob wir uns duzen können...
Sandra: Hmm... vielleicht sind das alte Leute? In Deutschland nennt man Leute nicht so schnell "du". Und wenn jemand älter ist, kannst du ihn nicht fragen. Du sollst warten, bis er es dir anbietet.
Paul: Okay, danke. Deutschland ist kompliziert.
Sandra: Ja, aber es ist selten ein Problem. Die Leute sehen ja auch, dass du kein Deutscher bist. Wenn ich die Leute einfach duze, ist es nicht so einfach zu erklären.
Judith: Now it’s slowly.
Sandra Käufer: Ist hier noch frei?
Paul Martens: Ähm, nein, tut mir leid, ich warte auf meine Tandempartnerin...
Sandra Käufer: Ich bin die Tandempartnerin! Sie sind doch Paul Martens, oder?
Paul Martens: Ja. Können wir uns nicht duzen?
Sandra Käufer: Okay. Also dann "du".
Paul: Wie geht es dir, Sandra?
Sandra: Gut, danke. Also, wie sollen wir das machen?
Paul: Hmm, sprechen wir eine halbe Stunde Deutsch und eine halbe Stunde Englisch?
Sandra: Klingt gut. Fangen wir auf Deutsch an?
Paul: Ja. Kann ich dich zunächst mal etwas fragen?
Sandra: Natürlich.
Paul: Also, die Leute gucken mich manchmal so komisch an wenn ich frage, ob wir uns duzen können...
Sandra: Hmm... vielleicht sind das alte Leute? In Deutschland nennt man Leute nicht so schnell "du". Und wenn jemand älter ist, kannst du ihn nicht fragen. Du sollst warten, bis er es dir anbietet.
Paul: Okay, danke. Deutschland ist kompliziert.
Sandra: Ja, aber es ist selten ein Problem. Die Leute sehen ja auch, dass du kein Deutscher bist. Wenn ich die Leute einfach duze, ist es nicht so einfach zu erklären.
Judith: Now with the translation.
Sandra Käufer: Ist hier noch frei?
Sandra Käufer: Is this seat available?
Paul Martens: Ähm, nein, tut mir leid, ich warte auf meine Tandempartnerin...
Paul Martens: Um, no, sorry, I'm waiting for my language exchange partner.
Sandra Käufer: Ich bin die Tandempartnerin! Sie sind doch Paul Martens, oder?
Sandra Käufer: I am the exchange partner! So you're Paul Martens, right?
Paul Martens: Ja. Können wir uns nicht duzen?
Paul Martens: Yes. Can't we speak informally (use "du" instead of "Sie")?
Sandra Käufer: Okay. Also dann "du".
Sandra Käufer: Okay. So "du", then.
Paul: Wie geht es dir, Sandra?
Paul: How's it going with you, Sandra?
Sandra: Gut, danke. Also, wie sollen wir das machen?
Sandra: Good, thanks. So, how should we do this?
Paul: Hmm, sprechen wir eine halbe Stunde Deutsch und eine halbe Stunde Englisch?
Paul: Hmm, speak a half hour of German and a half hour of English?
Sandra: Klingt gut. Fangen wir auf Deutsch an?
Sandra: Sounds good. Shall we start in German?
Paul: Ja. Kann ich dich zunächst mal etwas fragen?
Paul: Yes. Can I ask you something first?
Sandra: Natürlich.
Sandra: Of course.
Paul: Also, die Leute gucken mich manchmal so komisch an wenn ich frage, ob wir uns duzen können...
Paul: So, people sometimes look at me funny if I ask if we can use "du"...
Sandra: Hmm... vielleicht sind das alte Leute? In Deutschland nennt man Leute nicht so schnell "du". Und wenn jemand älter ist, kannst du ihn nicht fragen. Du sollst warten, bis er es dir anbietet.
Sandra: Hmm... maybe they're old people? In Germany one doesn't call people "du" so fast. And if someone is older, you can't ask him. You should wait until he offers it to you.
Paul: Okay, danke. Deutschland ist kompliziert.
Paul: Okay, thanks. Germany is complicated.
Sandra: Ja, aber es ist selten ein Problem. Die Leute sehen ja auch, dass du kein Deutscher bist. Wenn ich die Leute einfach duze, ist es nicht so einfach zu erklären.
Sandra: Yes, but it's rarely a problem. The people also see that you're not a German. If I were to just use "du" with people, it wouldn't be so simple to account for.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Judith: Ok, so he’s doing a language exchange. How about if we have some tips for that?
Chuck: Sounds good. Well, I’d say you’re not ready for a language exchange if you can't have a basic conversation yet. Or you have to be looking for someone who shares another language with you and who can teach you native language. Most native speakers have no idea how to teach their own language.
Judith: Yes. No matter what, most likely your partner will need you to speak slowly. Practice doing that if you haven’t tried to slow down before. Also, practice avoiding difficult vocabulary. As a rule of thumb, a word is good for a beginner if you use this word every day, it’s good for an intermediate student if you use it every week or so, and it’s advanced if you use it less often than that.
Chuck: Corrections can stop interesting conversations. In order not to get side-tracked, try just saying the word or sentence correctly without any commentary, so there’s no need for your partner to repeat or interrupt his train of thought.
Judith: Also, don’t correct everything [inaudible 00:03:37], I mean unless your language partner seriously asks you to. Try to sense when corrections become too much. The important thing is to have fun while using your target languages.
Chuck: Bring paper to write on so that you can take note of everything you want to learn and look up later. Let`s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Chuck: The first word we shall see is.
Judith: [Frei]
Chuck: “Free” or “available”.
Judith: [Frei, frei]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Warten]
Chuck: To wait.
Judith: [Warten, warten]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Duzen]
Chuck: To address informally with [Du].
Judith: [Duzen, duzen]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Anfangen]
Chuck: To begin or start.
Judith: [Anfangen, anfangen] and this is a vowel-changing verb that also splits off the prefix so [Er fängt an].
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Zunächst]
Chuck: “Initially” or “at first”.
Judith: [Zunächst, zunächst]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Fragen]
Chuck: To ask.
Judith: [Fragen, fragen]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Leute]
Chuck: People.
Judith: [Leute, Leute] This is always plural.
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Manchmal]
Chuck: Sometimes.
Judith: [Manchmal, manchmal]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Komisch]
Chuck: “Strange”, “weird” or “funny”.
Judith: [Komisch, komisch]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Nennen]
Chuck: “To name” or “call”.
Judith: [Nennen, nennen]
Chuck: Next,
Judith: [Schnell]
Chuck: “Quick”, “quickly” or “fast”.
Judith: [Schnell, schnell]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Jemand]
Chuck: Somebody.
Judith: [Jemand, jemand]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Anbieten]
Chuck: To offer.
Judith: [Anbieten, anbieten] This is a separable verb so [Er bietet an].
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Chuck: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Judith: The first word we'll look at is [Ist hier noch frei?].
Chuck: Is this seat still free?
Judith: It’s a typical question to ask if you want to sit down in a crowded place, like next to someone who’s already sitting at a table. Next there’s [Duzen]. This is an untranslatable German verb. It means “to address someone as [Du]”, that is to address someone informally. The opposite of [Duzen] is [Siezen], “to address someone as [Sie]”. And finally [Älter] means “older”. This is the comparative form of [Alt] meaning “old”.
LESSON FOCUS
Chuck: The focus of this lesson are accusative personal pronouns.
Judith: This is a good time to review the accusative personal pronouns.
Chuck: We’ve seen most of them before but here’s the complete list.
Judith: [Ich] becomes [Mich].
Chuck: Me.
Judith: [Du] becomes [Dich].
Chuck: You.
Judith: [Er] becomes [Ihn].
Chuck: Him.
Judith: [Sie] and [Es] stay the same. [Wir] becomes [Uns].
Chuck: Us.
Judith: [Ihr] becomes [Euch].
Chuck: You (plural).
Judith: [Sie] stays the same.
Chuck: Them.
Judith: Now, all that’s left to figure out is whether something should be accusative or dative. A quick rule of thumb is that if the object of an action could be a thing, then the accusative may be right.
Chuck: For example [Ich sehe ihn], if you could see a person, but you could also see a thing, so we use accusative here. There are lots of exceptions for this rule though.
OUTRO
Chuck: Well that just about does it for today. Listeners, do you know the reason flashcards are so popular?
Judith: It’s because they work.
Chuck: We have taken this time tested studying tool and modernized it with MyWordbank flashcards.
Judith: Learn vocabulary, using your eyes and ears.
Chuck: It’s simple and powerful. Save difficult and interesting words to your personal vocabulary lists called MyWordbank
Judith: Master words in your MyWordbank by practising with flashcards.
Chuck: Words in MyWordbank come with Audio, so you learn proper pronunciation.
Judith: While you learn to recognize words by sight.
Chuck: Go to GermanPod101.com by now and try MyWordbank and flashcards today. We hope you enjoyed this lesson. See you next week!
Judith: Wir hoffen euch hat diese Lektion gefallen, bis nächste Woche!

7 Comments

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GermanPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hello, GermanPod101 listeners! Does your language have different levels of formality? If so, how do you know when to switch between them? Leave us a comment and tell us about it!

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GermanPod101.com
Thursday at 10:14 am
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Hello Тарык,


Thank you for your feedback!👍


As usual, please let me make a few tiny little changes to help you

improve your German even more:

Einmal habe ich mich mit meinen Freuden darüber geredet. Ich habe es angeboten. Seitdem duzen wir uns wenn wir sprechen)


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com


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Тарык
Sunday at 11:24 pm
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Hallo!)


Einmal mit meine Freude ich habe über das geredet. Ich habe es angeboten. Dazu wir haben duzen sprechen)

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GermanPod101.com
Tuesday at 9:43 am
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Hallo Chris,


Thank you for pointing this out, this issue has been fixed!

Thank you for your comment!


Regards

Mélanie

Team GermanPod101.com

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Chris
Saturday at 3:44 pm
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The grammar section of the PDF is incomplete.

I think there are more accusative personal pronouns that just ich :-)

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GermanPod101.com
Monday at 4:03 pm
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Hi Salivia,


Indeed some people offer the "du" right away.

It depends on the situation and how comfortable people feel when talking to each other :smile:


Rilana / GermanPod101.com

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salivia_baker
Tuesday at 2:21 am
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Why does she ask "ist hier noch frei?" when she knows she will sit down? If I were her I'd ask "Entschuldigen Sie, sind Sie Paul Martens?"


I was surprised at how fast Paul was with asking if they could use "du". Maybe he isn't good at using Sie for an extended time XD