Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Chuck: Chuck here, Upper-Beginner Season 2, Lesson 5 - Make sure you bring a cake to your German birthday party. Hello and welcome to GermanPod101.com the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn German.
Judith: I am Judith and thanks again for being here with us for this Upper-Beginner Season 2 lesson.
Chuck: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to talk about dates in German.
Judith: This conversation takes place at a German language school in berlin.
Chuck: The conversation is between Chuck, Sarah, Paul and Mrs. [Weber], the teacher.
Judith: The speakers are participating in adult education, therefore they’ll be speaking formal German.
Chuck: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Chuck: Morgen habe ich Geburtstag. Kann ich dann etwas Kuchen mitbringen?
Frau Weber: Kuchen? Natürlich können Sie in der Pause Kuchen essen. Können Sie uns Ihr Geburtsdatum auf Deutsch sagen?
Chuck: Ja. Ich bin am 07. September 1971 geboren.
Sarah: Feierst du auch, Chuck? Ich meine, so eine richtige Geburtstagsparty.
Chuck: Hmm, ich möchte meiner Gastfamilie nicht lästig fallen...
Sarah: Du brauchst ja nicht bei ihnen feiern. Du kannst Leute in ein Restaurant einladen, oder in eine Kneipe...
Chuck: Ah, gute Idee! Ich glaube, das mache ich.
Frau Weber: Wann haben Sie denn Geburtstag, Sarah?
Sarah: Ich habe am zweiten Januar Geburtstag.
Chuck: Auch nicht schlecht, dann hast du Schnee an deinem Geburtstag.
Sarah: In Spanien? Da gibt es selten Schnee. Hier in Deutschland gibt es oft Schnee an meinem Geburtstag.
Weber: Und da sind wir wieder beim Thema Wetter. Aber leider haben wir keine Zeit mehr. Wiederholen Sie als Hausaufgabe die Vokabeln auf Seite 56 und schreiben Sie einen Text über das Wetter an Ihrem Geburtstag.
Paul: Frau Weber, ich habe am 11.03. Geburtstag. Wie heißt der dritte Monat auf Deutsch?
Frau Weber: Das ist der März. Sie sind am 11. März geboren.
Paul: Danke.
Judith: Now it’s slowly.
Chuck: Morgen habe ich Geburtstag. Kann ich dann etwas Kuchen mitbringen?
Frau Weber: Kuchen? Natürlich können Sie in der Pause Kuchen essen. Können Sie uns Ihr Geburtsdatum auf Deutsch sagen?
Chuck: Ja. Ich bin am 07. September 1971 geboren.
Sarah: Feierst du auch, Chuck? Ich meine, so eine richtige Geburtstagsparty.
Chuck: Hmm, ich möchte meiner Gastfamilie nicht lästig fallen...
Sarah: Du brauchst ja nicht bei ihnen feiern. Du kannst Leute in ein Restaurant einladen, oder in eine Kneipe...
Chuck: Ah, gute Idee! Ich glaube, das mache ich.
Frau Weber: Wann haben Sie denn Geburtstag, Sarah?
Sarah: Ich habe am zweiten Januar Geburtstag.
Chuck: Auch nicht schlecht, dann hast du Schnee an deinem Geburtstag.
Sarah: In Spanien? Da gibt es selten Schnee. Hier in Deutschland gibt es oft Schnee an meinem Geburtstag.
Weber: Und da sind wir wieder beim Thema Wetter. Aber leider haben wir keine Zeit mehr. Wiederholen Sie als Hausaufgabe die Vokabeln auf Seite 56 und schreiben Sie einen Text über das Wetter an Ihrem Geburtstag.
Paul: Frau Weber, ich habe am 11.03. Geburtstag. Wie heißt der dritte Monat auf Deutsch?
Frau Weber: Das ist der März. Sie sind am 11. März geboren.
Paul: Danke.
Judith: Now with the translation.
Chuck: Morgen habe ich Geburtstag. Kann ich dann etwas Kuchen mitbringen?
Chuck: Tomorrow is my birthday. Can I bring some cake then?
Frau Weber: Kuchen? Natürlich können Sie in der Pause Kuchen essen. Können Sie uns Ihr Geburtsdatum auf Deutsch sagen?
Mrs. Weber: Cake? Of course you can eat cake during the break. Can you tell us your birth date in German?
Chuck: Ja. Ich bin am 07. September 1971 geboren.
Chuck: Yes. I was born on the 7th of September, 1971.
Sarah: Feierst du auch, Chuck? Ich meine, so eine richtige Geburtstagsparty.
Sarah: Are you also celebrating, Chuck? I mean, like a proper birthday party?
Chuck: Hmm, ich möchte meiner Gastfamilie nicht lästig fallen...
Chuck: Hmm, I don't want to be bothersome to my host family...
Sarah: Du brauchst ja nicht bei ihnen feiern. Du kannst Leute in ein Restaurant einladen, oder in eine Kneipe...
Sarah: You don't have to celebrate at their place. You can invite people to a restaurant, or to a bar...
Chuck: Ah, gute Idee! Ich glaube, das mache ich.
Chuck: Ah, good idea! I think I'll do that.
Frau Weber: Wann haben Sie denn Geburtstag, Sarah?
Mrs. Weber: So when's your birthday, Sarah?
Sarah: Ich habe am zweiten Januar Geburtstag.
Sarah: My birthday is on the 2nd of January.
Chuck: Auch nicht schlecht, dann hast du Schnee an deinem Geburtstag.
Chuck: Also not bad, then you have snow on your birthday.
Sarah: In Spanien? Da gibt es selten Schnee. Hier in Deutschland gibt es oft Schnee an meinem Geburtstag.
Sarah: In Spain? There's rarely snow there. Here in Germany there's often snow on my birthday.
Weber: Und da sind wir wieder beim Thema Wetter. Aber leider haben wir keine Zeit mehr. Wiederholen Sie als Hausaufgabe die Vokabeln auf Seite 56 und schreiben Sie einen Text über das Wetter an Ihrem Geburtstag.
Mrs. Weber: And with that, we're back to the topic of weather. But unfortunately we don't have any time left. Review as homework the vocabulary on page 56 and write a text about the weather on your birthday.
Paul: Frau Weber, ich habe am 11.03. Geburtstag. Wie heißt der dritte Monat auf Deutsch?
Paul: Mrs. Weber, my birthday is 11.03. What's the third month called in German?
Frau Weber: Das ist der März. Sie sind am 11. März geboren.
Mrs. Weber: It's "März". You were born on the 11th of March.
Paul: Danke.
Paul: Thanks.
CULTURAL INSIGHTS
Judith: Ok, how about we talk a bit about birthday customs in Germany?
Chuck: Alright, sounds good.
Judith: Is there anything that’s different here?
Chuck: Well, one thing to remember is you never celebrate someone’s birthday before their birthday.
Judith: Yes. Don’t wish them a happy birthday before their birthday because people are superstitious and they will think that it brings bad luck to have you wish happy birthday before it’s their birthday. It’s like anything can happen in that time.
Chuck: As the birthday person, you’re expected to treat people in Germany. If you celebrate your birthday at the restaurant, you’re kind of expected to pay the bill.
Judith: Yes. Also, you may be expected to bring breakfast or cake to your workplace or school. Traditions can vary depending on the place, so you better ask your colleagues beforehand.
Chuck: Oh, there’s also a special German thing of associating bowling with birthdays. Well, that is Germans don’t typically go bowling in the free time, unless they’re part of a bowling club or it’s their birthday. That doesn’t mean that all Germans go bowling for their birthday, it just means that bowling’s associated with birthdays.
Judith: Yes.
Chuck: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Judith: The first word is “Geburt”.
Chuck: Birth.
Judith: [Geburt, Geburt, die Geburt] and the plural is [Geburten].
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Kuchen]
Chuck: “Cake” or “pie”.
Judith: [Kuchen, Kuchen, der Kuchen] and the plural is the same.
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Bringen]
Chuck: “To bring” or “to take somebody somewhere”.
Judith: [Bringen, bringen]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Natürlich]
Chuck: “Of course”, “natural” or “naturally”.
Judith: [Natürlich, natürlich]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Pause]
Chuck: “Rest” or “intermission”.
Judith: [Pause, Pause, die Pause] and the plural is [Pausen].
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Geboren]
Chuck: Born.
Judith: [Geboren, geboren]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Lästig]
Chuck: Bothersome.
Judith: [Lästig, lästig]
Chuck: Next
Judith: “Restaurant”
Chuck: Restaurant.
Judith: [Restaurant, Restaurant, das Restaurant] and the plural is [Restaurants].
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Kneipe]
Chuck: “Pub” or “bar”.
Judith: [Kneipe, Kneipe, die Kneipe] and the plural is [Kneipen].
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Schnee]
Chuck: Snow.
Judith: [Schnee, Schnee, der Schnee]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Leider]
Chuck: Unfortunately.
Judith: [Leider, leider]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Selten]
Chuck: “Really” or “seldom”.
Judith: [Selten, selten]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Hausaufgabe]
Chuck: Homework.
Judith: [Hausaufgabe, Hausaufgabe, die Hausaufgabe] and the plural is [Hausaufgaben].
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Monat]
Chuck: Month.
Judith: [Monat, Monat, der Monat] and the plural is [Monate].
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Chuck: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Judith: The first word we’ll look at is [Bringen].
Chuck: To bring.
Judith: Yeah, [Bringen] simply is “to bring”, but [Mitbringen], “to bring along”. The [Mit] generally has the meaning of “along”. Then [Die Geburt]. [Die Geburt] means “birth” but from this we get other words like [Geburtstag].
Chuck: Birthday.
Judith: [Geburtsdatum]
Chuck: Birth date.
Judith: [Geburtsort]
Chuck: Birth place.
Judith: [Geburtstagsparty]
Chuck: Birthday party.
Judith: And other words. Then [Feiern] is “to celebrate” and it’s the verb related to [Die Feier].
Chuck: Celebration.
Judith: [Feiern, die Feier] Finally, [Lästig fallen].
Chuck: Literally, “to fall bothersome”.
Judith: It’s a German expression. [Lästig fallen] means “to be a bother”.

Lesson focus

Chuck: The focus of this lesson are month names and dates.
Judith: The month names in German are almost the same as in English.
Chuck: Well, except for March which is called [März]. That’s still pretty close actually.
Judith: Yeah, I will give you all the names. [Januar, Februar, März, April, Mai, Juni, Juli, August, September, Oktober, November, Dezember] Of these [April, August, September] and [November] are spelled exactly as in English.
Chuck: [Mai, Juni and Juli] end in I. [Januar and Februar] are just missing the final Y.
Judith: [Oktober and Dezember] are adapted to German orthography. The C in [Oktober] becomes a K and the C in [Dezember] becomes a [Z].
Chuck: So could you say those in months once again?
Judith: Yes, [Januar, Februar, März, April, Mai, Juni, Juli, August, September, Oktober, November, Dezember].
Chuck: Now remember what we said about ordinal numbers and how to read a date in the last lesson?
Judith: German dates may be read as [Erster Mai] and it’s written as 1. [Mai] or 1.3. or 01.03.
Chuck: For years, 2011 is [Zweitausendelf] but everything before the year 2000 is counted as hundreds. Could you give me some examples?
Judith: Yeah, like 1999 is [Neunzehnhundertneunundneunzig], 1984 is [Neunzehnhundertvierundachtzig], 1806 is [Achtzehnhundertsechs] and 1962 is [Neunzehnhundertzweiundsechzig].
Chuck: And yes, you might actually run into a year of 1962 sometime in Germany.
Judith: It’s just like in English, you just must not leave out the word [Hundert]. You can’t say the equivalent of 1920, you have to say nineteen hundred twenty “Neunzehnhundertzwanzig”.

Outro

Chuck: Well, that just about does it for today.
Judith: Listeners, can you understand German TV-Shows, Movies or Songs?
Chuck: How about friends or loved ones? Conversation in German?
Judith: If you want to know what is going on, we have a tool to help.
Chuck: Line by line audio.
Judith: Listen to the conversations line by line and learn to understand natural German fast.
Chuck: It's simple, really.
Judith: With a click of a button, listen to each line of the conversation.
Chuck: Listen again and again and tune your ears with natural German.
Judith: Rapidly understand natural German with this powerful tool.
Chuck: Find this feature on the lesson page under premium member resources at GermanPod101.com. So, see you next week.
Judith: Also, bis nächste Woche.

3 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.

GermanPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello, GermanPod101 listeners! When is your birthday? How do you usually celebrate it? Leave us a comment and let us know!

GermanPod101.comVerified
Friday at 4:33 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hallo Salivia,


ja, Du hast recht! :smile:


Der Ausdruck [lästig fallen] ist etwas ungewöhnlich oder vielleicht regional.


Richtig ist natürlich [lästig sein] oder [lästig werden].


Rilana / GermanPod101.com

salivia_baker
Tuesday at 1:57 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Vielleicht hat das etwas mit regionalen Unterschieden zu tun, aber "lästig fallen" hört sich für mich komisch an. Ich kenne "lästig sein" bzw. "lästig werden" und "zur Last fallen".