Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Chuck: Chuck here, Upper-Beginner Season 2 Lesson 24 - Being sick in Germany. Hello and welcome to GermanPod101.com. The fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn German. I`m joined in the studio by.
Judith: Hello everyone, Judith here.
Chuck: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to talk to the doctor in German.
Judith: This conversation takes place at a physician’s office.
Chuck: The conversation is between Paul and the doctor.
Judith: The speakers are in a business relationship therefore they’ll be speaking formal German.
Chuck: Let`s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Paul: Ich habe Kopfschmerzen, aber meine Arme und Beine tun auch weh.
Ärztin: Seit wann ist das so?
Paul: Erst seit heute Morgen, ganz plötzlich. Gestern Abend war noch alles okay, und heute geht es mir gar nicht gut.
Ärztin: Haben Sie heute Morgen etwas gegessen?
Paul: Nein, ich hatte keinen Hunger.
Ärztin: Ich weiß, was Sie haben. Eine Grippe.
Paul: Eine Grippe? Das kann nicht sein. Ich hatte schon oft Grippe, und es war nie so furchtbar. Sonst wäre ich auch nicht hier.
Ärztin: Sie hatten wahrscheinlich keine Grippe, sondern eine Erkältung. Viele Menschen nennen eine Erkältung auch 'Grippe'.
Paul: Und was mache ich jetzt?
Ärztin: Ich werde Ihnen Antibiotika verschreiben. Diese nehmen Sie so lange ein, bis es Ihnen wieder besser geht. Außerdem dürfen Sie eine Woche lang nicht aus dem Haus gehen, damit Sie niemanden anstecken.
Paul: Aber... ich habe eine Klassenarbeit am vierten!
Ärztin: Ich schreibe Sie krank, kein Problem. Dann müssen Sie nicht zur Schule und müssen die Klassenarbeit auch nicht schreiben.
Paul: Darf ich denn zuhause Videospiele spielen?
Ärztin: Natürlich.
Paul: Dann werde ich versuchen, diese Woche als Urlaub zu sehen.
Judith: Now it’s slowly.
Paul: Ich habe Kopfschmerzen, aber meine Arme und Beine tun auch weh.
Ärztin: Seit wann ist das so?
Paul: Erst seit heute Morgen, ganz plötzlich. Gestern Abend war noch alles okay, und heute geht es mir gar nicht gut.
Ärztin: Haben Sie heute Morgen etwas gegessen?
Paul: Nein, ich hatte keinen Hunger.
Ärztin: Ich weiß, was Sie haben. Eine Grippe.
Paul: Eine Grippe? Das kann nicht sein. Ich hatte schon oft Grippe, und es war nie so furchtbar. Sonst wäre ich auch nicht hier.
Ärztin: Sie hatten wahrscheinlich keine Grippe, sondern eine Erkältung. Viele Menschen nennen eine Erkältung auch 'Grippe'.
Paul: Und was mache ich jetzt?
Ärztin: Ich werde Ihnen Antibiotika verschreiben. Diese nehmen Sie so lange ein, bis es Ihnen wieder besser geht. Außerdem dürfen Sie eine Woche lang nicht aus dem Haus gehen, damit Sie niemanden anstecken.
Paul: Aber... ich habe eine Klassenarbeit am vierten!
Ärztin: Ich schreibe Sie krank, kein Problem. Dann müssen Sie nicht zur Schule und müssen die Klassenarbeit auch nicht schreiben.
Paul: Darf ich denn zuhause Videospiele spielen?
Ärztin: Natürlich.
Paul: Dann werde ich versuchen, diese Woche als Urlaub zu sehen.
Judith: Now with the translation.
Paul: Ich habe Kopfschmerzen, aber meine Arme und Beine tun auch weh.
Paul: I have a headache, but my arms and legs also hurt.
Ärztin: Seit wann ist das so?
Doctor: Since when is that?
Paul: Erst seit heute Morgen, ganz plötzlich. Gestern Abend war noch alles okay, und heute geht es mir gar nicht gut.
Paul: Only since this morning, very suddenly. Yesterday night everything was okay still, and today I'm not feeling well at all.
Ärztin: Haben Sie heute Morgen etwas gegessen?
Doctor: Have you eaten anything this morning?
Paul: Nein, ich hatte keinen Hunger.
Paul: No, I wasn't hungry.
Ärztin: Ich weiß, was Sie haben. Eine Grippe.
Doctor: I know what you're suffering from. A flu.
Paul: Eine Grippe? Das kann nicht sein. Ich hatte schon oft Grippe, und es war nie so furchtbar. Sonst wäre ich auch nicht hier.
Paul: A flu? That's not possible. I already had the flu often and it was never this horrible. Otherwise I wouldn't be here.
Ärztin: Sie hatten wahrscheinlich keine Grippe, sondern eine Erkältung. Viele Menschen nennen eine Erkältung auch 'Grippe'.
Doctor: You probably didn't have the flu, but a cold. Many people call a cold also a 'flu'.
Paul: Und was mache ich jetzt?
Paul: And what do I do now?
Ärztin: Ich werde Ihnen Antibiotika verschreiben. Diese nehmen Sie so lange ein, bis es Ihnen wieder besser geht. Außerdem dürfen Sie eine Woche lang nicht aus dem Haus gehen, damit Sie niemanden anstecken.
Doctor: I will prescribe antibiotics. You will take these until you feel better again. Besides you must not leave the house for a week, so that you don't infect anyone.
Paul: Aber... ich habe eine Klassenarbeit am vierten!
Paul: But... I have an exam on the fourth!
Ärztin: Ich schreibe Sie krank, kein Problem. Dann müssen Sie nicht zur Schule und müssen die Klassenarbeit auch nicht schreiben.
Doctor: I'll write you a note, no problem. Then you don't have to go to school and you also don't have to write the exam.
Paul: Darf ich denn zuhause Videospiele spielen?
Paul: May I play video games at home?
Ärztin: Natürlich.
Doctor: Of course.
Paul: Dann werde ich versuchen, diese Woche als Urlaub zu sehen.
Paul: Then I'll try to see this week as a vacation.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Chuck: Let’s talk about being sick in Germany.
Judith: Yeah, maybe some general points that we missed in the last lesson. One thing is that people go to the doctor much more often because everyone has health insurance.
Chuck: Also people don’t work when they’re sick because they have unlimited days of sick leave, as long as the doctor prescribed them sick leave. Getting that doctor’s note is a major reason to see a doctor even when you think things are under your control.
Judith: German home remedies include bed rest, tea, [Zwieback] it’s a kind of crackers, also a bottle-shaped thing filled with hot water and pain killers.
Chuck: Pain killers and other tablets are taken less often than in the States. Also, they’re not available in large packs.
Judith: Yes. It was pretty amazing for me when I went to the States and I saw these, like, huge dispensers of tablets like you would have dispensers of M&Ms.
Chuck: Also know that you can’t get even over the counter medicine at any place except pharmacies. And pharmacies don’t sell groceries or other things unrelated to your health.
Judith: The entire sector if more professionalized.
Chuck: You have a separation of pharmacies and drug stores.
Judith: Drug stores have toiletries and pharmacies have medicine.
Chuck: Let`s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Chuck: The first word we shall see is.
Judith: [Kopf].
Chuck: Head.
Judith: [Kopf, Kopf, der Kopf] and the plural is [Köpfe].
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Arm]
Chuck: Arm.
Judith: [Arm, Arm, der Arm] and the plural is [Arme].
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Bein]
Chuck: Leg.
Judith: [Bein, Bein, das Bein] and the plural is [Beine].
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Plötzlich]
Chuck: Suddenly.
Judith: [Plötzlich, plötzlich]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Grippe]
Chuck: Flu.
Judith: [Grippe, Grippe, die Grippe]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Sondern]
Chuck: “But” or “instead”.
Judith: [Sondern, sondern]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Erkältung]
Chuck: Cold.
Judith: [Erkältung, Erkältung, die Erkältung] and the plural is [Erkältungen].
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Antibiotikum]
Chuck: Antibiotics.
Judith: [Antibiotikum, Antibiotikum] this is neuter and the plural is [Antibiotika].
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Verschreiben]
Chuck: “To prescribe” or “miswrite”.
Judith: [Verschreiben, verschreiben]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Einnehmen]
Chuck: To take medicine.
Judith: [Einnehmen, einnehmen] and the form is [Er nimmt ein], so vowel-changing and splitting.
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Anstecken]
Chuck: “To infect” or “pin on”.
Judith: [Anstecken, anstecken] and the [An] splits off.
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Spiel]
Chuck: “Game” or “match”.
Judith: [Spiel, Spiel, das Spiel] and the plural is [Spiele].
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Urlaub]
Chuck: Vacation.
Judith: [Urlaub, Urlaub, der Urlaub]
Chuck: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Judith: The first phrase we'll look at is [Eine Woche lang].
Chuck: “A week long” or “for a week”.
Judith: It showcases that special use of [Lang] again, the one that we saw in the previous lesson. [Einen Moment lang] meant “for a moment”, and now [Eine Woche lang] means “for a week”. When you use this, don’t forget the word [Lang].
Chuck: And [Für eine Woche] doesn’t work at all, right? That’s a mistake.
Judith: No, not at all.
Chuck: It’s a common mistake that English speakers make in German.
Judith: The other thing I want to look at is [Krank schreiben].
Chuck: To write a doctor’s note.
Judith: Yeah. It means a doctor to write an official statement saying that you’re sick, that’s why we’re saying [Krank schreiben], “to write sick” because he writes that you’re sick. And this statement is very valuable because it means that you get paid sick leave from work. Or if you’re going to school, you’re fully excused. Doctors will try to estimate how long you’ll be sick for and include that in the note. If it’s not long enough, they can extend it. If your recovery goes faster than expected, then you can just enjoy.
Chuck: The focus of this lesson are [Muss nicht] and [Darf nicht]. Since we taught you the verbs [Müssen] and [Dürfen], we should probably mention that the negative versions don’t work quite as you’d expect.
Judith: The equivalent of “must not” is [Darf nicht], and the equivalent of [Muss nicht] actually means “doesn’t need to”.
Chuck: Could you tell us the full list of equivalents?
Judith: Yes. [Er kann nicht].
Chuck: He can’t.
Judith: [Er braucht nicht]
Chuck: He need not.
Judith: [Er muss nicht].
Chuck: He need not.
Judith: [Er darf nicht].
Chuck: “He must not”, as in it is forbidden for him to…
Judith: And you should really commit this to memory because you’ll be making some serious mistakes because “Müssen” is “Must”, but “Muss nicht” is “Need not”, “Must not” ist “Darf nicht”.
OUTRO
Chuck: That just about does it for today.
Judith: Get instant access to all of our language learning lessons.
Chuck: With any subscription, instantly access our entire library of audio and video lessons.
Judith: Download the lessons or listen or watch online.
Chuck: Put them on your phone or another mobile device, listen, watch and learn anywhere.
Judith: Lessons are organized by level. So progress in order, one level at a time.
Chuck: Or skip around to different levels. It`s all up to you.
Judith: Instantly access them all, right now, at GermanPod101.com.
Chuck: Thank you.
Judith: Vielen Dank. Bis nächstes Mal!

7 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters.

user profile picture
GermanPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hoi!

Hoi! What are the challenges in learning German? Do share your experience!

 

Regards,

Germanpod101.com

user profile picture
GermanPod101.com
Friday at 11:35 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Addie,


Even though one always has to be careful using words copied from a dictionary because they are often not specific enough for a certain context, I believe that using a dictionary is a good thing, it helps to build up vocabulary.

And you are doing really well, as I said :)


Keep up the good work!


Katrin

Team GermanPod101.com

user profile picture
Addie
Tuesday at 4:50 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Thanks! Though, I use a dictionary sometimes to make my posts.

user profile picture
GermanPod101.com
Monday at 5:17 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Addie,


The word order is a tricky thing in German - a lot of things are correct and then other sentences, who seem to be also working, are not.


And special vocabulary is always hard - however, from what I've read from you on here, you are doing really good!


Thank you for writing!


Katrin

Team GermanPod101.com

user profile picture
Addie
Saturday at 9:58 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

For me the word order is a challenge, but I think I am understanding it a bit since I have been listening to your podcasts.


And another thing for me is where you can see words you know in German inside of a word, but it actually has nothing to do with the meaning. Like "damit" looks like it should mean "there with", not "with that". Things like that are very difficult.

user profile picture
GermanPod101.com
Tuesday at 12:09 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Agnès,


Yes, I understand it's hard to distinguish between all these small words. They are important regarding a natural flow of the German language, though. Natives will be amazed if you can handle those.


Thank you very much for your feedback and keep on learning German with us.


Lars

Team GermanPod101.com

user profile picture
Agnès
Monday at 6:56 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

The german language uses a lot of small words such as auch, da noch .. in the sentence . Therefore you think it is word you do not know instead it is the mix of the adverb + noun or whatever that takes you off guard.