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M: Hello and welcome to German Survival Phrases brought to you by germanpod101.com, this course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Germany. You will be surprised at how far a little German will go. Now before we jump in, remember to stop by germanpod101.com and there you will find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment.
F: German Survival Phrases. Lesson 41, A Guide to Foreign Exchange in Germany.
M: Exchanging money in Germany is quite convenient. One can exchange money at airports, banks or withdraw money from an ATM. Rates applied when withdrawing money from an ATM are likely to be quite good however when using an ATM, it is advisable to make one large withdrawal as you may be charged by both the local bank and your home one. So first things first. Let’s find a location that will exchange money. First, let’s review some previous phrases and patterns we’ve already covered. In German, is there a cash machine ATM near here is [Gibt es einen Bankautomaten in der Nähe] Let’s break it down by syllable [Gibt es einen Bankautomaten in der Nähe] Now let’s see it once again [Gibt es einen Bankautomaten in der Nähe] Now to ask for a bank, we can just replace the word for cash machine ATM with bank and the phrase works just fine. Is there a bank near here is [Gibt es eine Bank in der Nähe] Let’s break it down by syllable [Gibt es eine Bank in der Nähe] The thing you are looking for is changing. In this case, it’s [Bank] bank. Let’s break down this word and hear it one more time [Bank] Careful because [Bank] is a feminine noun. So we have changed also the indefinite article from [einen] to [eine]. So to recap, we have [einen Bank] and altogether [Gibt es eine Bank in der Nähe] For times when there is neither a bank nor an ATM, you can ask, where can I exchange currency which in German is [Wo kann ich Geld wechseln] Let’s break it down by syllable [Wo kann ich Geld wechseln] Now let’s hear it once again [Wo kann ich Geld wechseln] The first word [Wo] means where. Let’s break down this word and hear it one more time. [Wo] This is followed by [kann] which in English is can. It’s the first person singular form of the helping verb [können] be able to. Let’s break down this word and hear it one more time. [kann] and [kann] Next is [ich] I. First in the pronoun first person singular. So to recap here, we have where can I [Wo kann ich] The next word is [Geld] which means money [Geld] and finally we have [wechseln] to change, to exchange. Let’s break it down by syllable and here it once more. [wechseln] So altogether we have [Wo kann ich Geld wechseln] literally this means where can I money change and it is translated as where can I exchange currency. Exchanging currency is pretty straightforward. You need to fill out some forms and then present the amount of money you want to have exchanged. One extremely useful phrase is smaller denominations please as it’s usually beneficial to have smaller amounts of currency on you for paying for the bus fare, taxi fare et cetera. In German, smaller denominations please is [In kleinen Scheinen bitte] Let’s break it down by syllable [In kleinen Scheinen bitte] Now let’s hear it once again [In kleinen Scheinen bitte] The first word is very easy [In] and it means exactly the same, in. Then you have [kleinen] small [kleinen] It is followed by [Scheinen] which literally means bills. It’s the plural form of the noun [Schein] bill. Let’s break down this word and hear it once more [Schein] Finally you have [bitte] please [bitte] altogether we have [In kleinen Scheinen bitte literally this means in small bills please and we translate it as smaller denominations please. Finally you can also use the phrase break this please to indicate you would like smaller amounts of currency. In German break this please is [Können Sie es bitte kleiner machen] Let’s break it down by syllable [Können Sie es bitte kleiner machen] Now let’s hear it once again [Können Sie es bitte kleiner machen] The first word [können] means can, third person plural of the verb [können] can using the formal way of speech. Let’s break down this word and hear it one more time [können] and [können]. The next word is the personal pronoun [Sie] which means you in the formal way of speech. This is followed by [es] it, pronoun, third person singular neutral. It refers to the currency you would like to have in smaller amounts [es]. Then we have [bitte] which in English means please. So to recap here, we have [Können Sie es bitte] which literally means can you it please. Next is [kleiner machen] which means smaller. The comparative form of [klein] small and lastly we have [machen] to make. So altogether we have [Können Sie es bitte kleiner machen] Literally this means can you it please smaller make but we translate it as break this please.
Okay to close our today’s lesson, we would like you to practice what you’ve just learned. I will provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you are responsible for shouting it out aloud. You have a few seconds before I give you the answer. So [Viel Glück] which means good luck in German.
Is there a cash machine near here [Gibt es einen Bankautomaten in der Nähe] Is there a bank near here [Gibt es einen Bank in der Nähe] Where can I exchange currency [Wo kann ich Geld wechseln] Smaller denominations please [In kleinen Scheinen bitte] Break this please [Können Sie es bitte kleiner machen] That’s going to do it for today.

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GermanPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hello listeners!

This lesson was quite convenient, don't you think?

Do you have any other questions about exchanging money in Germany? Fell free to ask us!

Germanpod101
Tuesday at 8:50 am
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Hi Tiarnna,


Thank you for the comment. We are glad to hear that! Thanks so much!:thumbsup::smile:


Best

Jennifer

Team Germanpod101.com

Tiarnna
Friday at 9:29 am
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I loved this instructor and lesson. There should be anothe one on banking. Very clear and useful.

:heart:

GermanPod101.comVerified
Thursday at 5:21 pm
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Hallo Frausonne,


That's great I'm glad to hear I could help! :)


Let us know if you have any other questions!


Vielen Dank!


Clara

Team GermanPod101.com

frausonne
Monday at 7:26 pm
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Thank you very much for the reply and explanation. Yes, it helps a lot. I can't wait to try the sentence in a bank!! Thanks again. :)

GermanPod101.comVerified
Monday at 7:22 pm
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Hallo Frausonne,


Thank you for your comment and question!


In German, we have an expression, which is "klein machen" (literally: to make small), which we use when we want to ask someone to change money into smaller units. So if you wanted to change a 50 Euro note into "smaller" notes you would say "könnten Sie mir den Schein klein machen? Ich hätte gerne zehn 5 Euro Scheine."

With regards to taking out money, you would say "ich möchte gerne 400 Euro abheben, könnten Sie mir bitte zwei 50 Euro Scheine, fünf 20 Euro Scheine, zehn 10 Euro Scheine und zwanzig 5 Euro Scheine geben?" (I would like to withdraw 400 Euros, could you give me ... please). The term for splitting the money into different bills is called "die Stückelung", which the bank teller might use to ask if you prefer a certain type of bill when withdrawing money. Some ATMs also give you the option to choose your preferred "Stückelung".


I hope this helps!


Vielen Dank!


Clara

Team GermanPod101.com

frausonne
Saturday at 7:11 pm
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How do you express this in a bank: I have a 50 Euro bill, and I'd like to exchange it with 10 of 5 Euro bill? Or, I'd like to withdraw 400 Euros with 2 of 50 Euro bill, 5 of 20 Euro bill, 10 of 10 Euro bill, and 20 of 5 Euro bill. I have a hard time expressing this in a bank. Could you please help me? Thank you.