Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

M: Hello and welcome to German Survival Phrases brought to you by germanpod101.com, this course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Germany. You will be surprised at how far a little German will go. Now before we jump in, remember to stop by germanpod101.com and there you will find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment.
F: German Survival Phrases. Lesson 31, Asking Directions in German.
M: In today’s lesson, we will introduce you to directions that will help you find the place you are looking for. Previously we introduced, is there a place near here and where is there a something but while we can now ask, we haven’t addressed understanding the answer. Today we are going to work on understanding what people say. Today, we will go over basic directions. First we have go straight. In German, go straight is [Gehen Sie gerade aus] Let’s break it down by syllable [Gehen Sie gerade aus] Now let’s hear it once again [Gehen Sie gerade aus] The first word [Gehen] means go, used together with a personal pronoun [Sie] in the formal way of speech. Let’s break down this word and hear it one more time [Gehen] and [Gehen] Now let’s hear it together with a pronoun [Gehen Sie] and [Gehen Sie] follows which in English is straight [geradeaus] and [geradeaus] So altogether we have [Gehen Sie geradeaus] literally this means go you straight. Let’s look at the next expression, to turn. Let’s cover turn right which in German is [rechts abbiegen] Let’s break it down by syllable [rechts abbiegen] Now let’s hear it once again [rechts abbiegen] The first word [rechts] means right which we use here as an adverb. In contrast to English, this word always precedes the verb. The verb [abbiegen] turn in its infinitive form follows next. So altogether we have [rechts abbiegen] Literally this means right turn but we translate it as turn right. Now let’s go and work on turn left. In German, turn left is [links abbiegen] Let’s break down this word and hear it one more time [links abbiegen] and [links abbiegen] Let’s try now with turn right at the light which in German is [an der Ampel rechts abbiegen] Let’s break it down by syllable and hear it one more time [an der Ampel rechts abbiegen] The first part of the German phrase [an der Ampel] which is at the light starts with the preposition [an] at followed by inflected definite article [der] the and completed by [Ampel] light, traffic light. Let’s break it down and hear it one more time [an der Ampel] The latter part of the phrase [rechts abbiegen] turn right is the same as we mentioned before. Let’s hear the entire sentence now. [An der Ampel rechts abbiegen] The traffic light phrase, turn right at the light or turn left at the light is very popular in Germany because giving directions to somebody while orientating yourself by the traffic lights of major intersections is a an effective way of giving directions. On the other hand, it’s not common to use the block phrase as in turn left after three blocks because most German cities look very different from American cities. For example, usually they have grown naturally with curves and angles and therefore they are not organized by a block counting system. Okay now let’s try another phrase, it’s on the right in German is [Es liegt rechterhand] Let’s break it down by syllable [Es liegt rechterhand] Now let’s hear it once again [Es liegt rechterhand] the first word [Es] means it [Es] The second word [liegt] means is located and it’s the third person singular form of the verb [liegen]. Finally you have the adverb [rechterhand] which means on the right. So altogether we have [Es liegt rechterhand] literally this means it is located right hand, it’s on the left in German is [Es liegt linkerhand] The only difference is the word [linker] in place of [rechter] Let’s break it down by syllable [Es liegt linkerhand] Now let’s hear it once again [Es liegt linkerhand] the first word [Es] means it, the second word [liegt] means is located and it is third person singular form of the verb [liegen] finally you have the adverb [linkerhand] which means on the left. So altogether we have [Es liegt linkerhand] literally this means it is located left hand. In Germany, it’s common to use the terms [linke Hand] left hand and [rechte Hand] right hand. What Germans mean when using these two phrases is that you can find your destination either on the left from where you are, left from your hand or on the right, right from your hand. So don’t worry when asking for directions and people start talking about their hands.
Okay to close our today’s lesson, we’d like you to practice what you’ve just learned. I provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you are responsible for shouting it out aloud. You have a few seconds before I give you the answer. So [Viel Glück] which means good luck in German.
Go straight [Gehen Sie geradeaus] turn right [Rechts abbiegen] turn left [Links abbiegen] turn right at the light [an der Ampel rechts abbiegen] it’s on the right [Es liegt rechterhand] it’s on the left [Es liegt linkerhand] That’s going to do it for today.

9 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters.

user profile picture
GermanPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

So many directions!

What way would you go?

user profile picture
GermanPod101.com
Thursday at 10:02 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello The internet isn't America,


Thank you for your honest reply and sorry for the

incovenience.😉


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com


user profile picture
The internet isn't America
Sunday at 5:34 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Halting the lesson and breaking the flow to talk about America and it's blocks was a bit annoying. It's sort of irrelevant for the rest of the entire world.


Other than that good job

Thanks!

user profile picture
Team Germanpod
Tuesday at 8:16 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Dot,


Right...actually there are just two umlauts missing in "Wir kampfen" should be "kämpfen" and "Korper" should be "Körper". :smile:


Best

Jennifer

Team Germanpod101.com

user profile picture
Dot
Tuesday at 2:02 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I am too new to see the mistakes but I would assume they are colloquialisms or slang. Please let me know which ones are wrong.

user profile picture
Team Germanpod
Monday at 4:16 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Dot,

Thanks for the lyrics! I found few mistakes in German, can you also see them?:grin:

Best

Jennifer

Team Germanpod101.com

user profile picture
Dot
Tuesday at 4:22 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Here is what I found. I am not sure the translation is accurate.

http://lyricstranslate.com/en/panzermensch-tank-man.html

user profile picture
Germanpod101
Monday at 1:16 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Dot,

Oh interesting! Can you recite more quotes from their songtexts maybe?

Best,

Jennifer

Team Germanpod101.com

user profile picture
Dot
Friday at 9:06 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I can't hear geradeaus without hearing the song Panzermensch by the band And One. Same with bereit.