Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Chuck: This is Newbie Series Lesson 5.
Judith: [Willkommen zurück].
Chuck: Welcome back.
Judith: How’s your German today?
Chuck: Do you get the impression that you can say more and more things in German?
Judith: Then you’re right because with every lesson you become more familiar with German, even if it happens unconsciously.
Chuck: If you consciously want to learn German and see you progress, we recommend using the word bank in the Learning Center. It’ll keep track of the vocabulary you need to learn from all the lessons you’ve done. You know those words you keep forgetting? As well as the ones you have safely tucked in memory.
Judith: Of course every bit of exposure to German helps. You will even improve when working with materials that are too advanced for you. For example, grab the PDF accompanying one of our advanced audio blogs and read the English translation. Then read the German as you listen to it being read. You will definitely pick up some new German words. And what’s more, you’ll improve your instinctive understanding of how German works as a language.
Chuck: You could also go to your local video store and get a German film like [Run, Lola, Run], but meanwhile we’ll help you develop your active German skills. In this lesson, we’ll learn how to ask someone out in German.
Judith: As if you still needed any help with that, Chuck.
Chuck: Well, I think some training can’t hurt actually. When you’re flirting with someone, you really want to use the correct words and grammar, otherwise you might seem a bit stupid.
Judith: So let’s listen to today’s conversation.
Chuck: Ok, so let’s continue the story of Michael and Lena. I will be Michael, as usual, and Judith will play Lena.
DIALOGUE
Michael Schmidt: Lena, hast du noch Lust auf einen Kaffee?
Lena Wagner: Nein, ich habe jetzt einen Termin.
Michael Schmidt: Und morgen? Hast du morgen Zeit?
Lena Wagner: Nein, morgen arbeite ich.
Michael Schmidt: Und hast du am Samstag Zeit?
Lena Wagner: Nein, ich arbeite auch am Samstag.
Judith: Now read slowly.
Michael Schmidt: Lena, hast du noch Lust auf einen Kaffee?
Lena Wagner: Nein, ich habe jetzt einen Termin.
Michael Schmidt: Und morgen? Hast du morgen Zeit?
Lena Wagner: Nein, morgen arbeite ich.
Michael Schmidt: Und hast du am Samstag Zeit?
Lena Wagner: Nein, ich arbeite auch am Samstag.
Judith: Now Chuck will give you the translation.
Judith: Now, Chuck will give you the translation. Lena, hast du noch Lust auf einen Kaffee?
Chuck: “Lena, are you still in the mood for some coffee?”
Judith: Nein, ich habe jetzt einen Termin.
Chuck: “No, I now have an appointment.”
Judith: Und morgen?
Chuck: “And tomorrow?”
Judith: Hast du morgen Zeit?
Chuck: “Do you have time tomorrow?”
Judith: Nein, morgen arbeite ich.
Chuck: “No, I work tomorrow.”
Judith: Hast du am Samstag Zeit?
Chuck: “Do you have time on Saturday?”
Judith: Nein, ich arbeite auch am Samstag.
Chuck: “No, I also work on Saturday.”
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Chuck: That didn’t sound like she wants to go out with me.
Judith: No, it didn’t.
Chuck: I have trouble understanding that. I mean I'm such a great guy. Maybe it was the setting. Aren’t ice cream parlors a good place to get to know new people.
Judith: Actually, they are. Ice cream Sundays are very popular in Germany and there are a lot of Italian ice cream parlors. They’re usually rather small, accommodating maybe 30 people inside, but in summer they put out chairs and tables outside and still can’t cope with the sheer mass of people that want to enjoy their ice cream Sunday. And this is where it’s easy to get to know new people.
Chuck: How’s that?
Judith: Well, normally you’re supposed to sit down at an empty table, unless you already know somebody on another table. However, if the place is packed you can just walk up to any table and ask if you can sit down there. Use the phrase [Ist hier noch frei?] that Michael used in the third newbie lesson. Then you will naturally get to talk with the other person at the table if you’re not a complete moron.
Chuck: Oh, so whenever somebody sits down at my table it means she’s interested in me, right?
Judith: Not quite, since the person could also just want a place to sit. But key questions like [Kommen sie oft hier hin?] should quickly show you if the other person is interested in spending time with you once this chance meeting is over.
Chuck: Cool. And then I get to pay for her ice cream.
Judith: No, I think that would be a bit too much at the point. Germans hardly ever pay for each other. Usually everybody pays what he ordered, even among friends. Also when somebody suggests going to a restaurant together, it does not necessarily mean that he’d treat you. He would actually have to say the words [Ich lade Sie ein], “I invite you”.
Chuck: Ah yes, I remember where I used to live I had a friend and we would go out to eat every once in a while. And a couple of times, you know, I would offer to pay the meal for us and occasionally I would, you know, still pay for the meal for us. And I realized he’s not actually ever paying for the meal for us, so I realized that I should stop paying for his meals and that Germans typically just always pay for themselves.
Judith: It’s the way it is here.
Chuck: So they like to go Dutch.
Judith: Well, I don’t know how you get to that word, “to go Dutch”, but it’s definitely something Germans do often.
Chuck: I see the Germans aren’t willing to admit that they do anything similar to the Dutch. So in that ice cream parlor the setting was ok but… so why didn’t she want to go out with me?
Judith: You didn’t understand what she said?
Chuck: Well, not really. I was too busy admiring her nice blonde hair, blue eyes, not to mention other aspects that…
VOCAB LIST
Judith: Let’s have a look at the new vocabulary to figure out what was the problem. The first new word is haben.
Chuck: “To have.”
Judith: haben. haben.
Chuck: To have.
Judith: Now, what can you have? You can have, for example, [Lust]. Next we have Lust.
Chuck: Notice that this doesn’t mean “lust”, it means “desire”.
Judith: Lust.
Chuck: “Desire”.
Judith: It’s usually used with the word [Auf], [Lust auf etwas], “desire for something”.
Chuck: Or [Lust auf Kaffee] which means “a desire for coffee”.
Judith: Kaffee is the next word, actually.
Chuck: Coffee.
Judith: Kaffee. Kaffee.
Chuck: Coffee.
Judith: So, as a complete sentence, you could say [Ich habe Lust auf Kaffee].
Chuck: I have the desire for coffee.
Judith: Or something else you could say with [Haben] is [Ich habe Zeit]. “I have time”. Zeit is…
Chuck: “Time”. You’ll also notice that [Die Zeit] is a very popular newspaper in Germany.
Judith: It is. Now, [Ich habe jetzt Zeit]. jetzt is…
Chuck: Now.
Judith: jetzt.
Chuck: Now.
Judith: Hast du jetzt Zeit?
Chuck: Do you have time now?
Judith: The next word is morgen.
Chuck: Tomorrow.
Judith: morgen.
Chuck: “Tomorrow”. Note that this can also mean “morning”.
Judith: Yeah, as a noun. [Der Morgen], “the morning”.
Chuck: Or as in [Guten Morgen].
Judith: But as an adverb, it means “tomorrow”. morgen.
Chuck: Tomorrow.
Judith: Ich habe morgen Zeit.
Chuck: I have time tomorrow.
Judith: Next we have Am Samstag.
Chuck: On Saturday.
Judith: Am Samstag.
Chuck: On Saturday.
Judith: And I believe in the dialogue, Michael asked Hast du am Samstag Zeit?
Chuck: Do you have time on Saturday?
Judith: And Lena actually did not have time for Michael. She said she had a Termin.
Chuck: Appointment.
Judith: Termin.
Chuck: “Appointment”. And it might have been an appointment with her boyfriend. That’s the only reason I see her not accepting me for a date.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Judith: [Ich habe einen Termin]
Chuck: “I have an appointment” with my boyfriend.
Judith: Anyway, I believe that that is the reason Lena said ich habe jetzt einen Termin..
Chuck: I now have an appointment.
Judith: Ich habe is the form of the new verb you learned. Haben. “To have.” This verb is a bit irregular.
Chuck: But ich habe looks completely regular to me.
Judith: Yeah, that form is regular. It’s the next form that is irregular. Du hast. “You have,” informally.
Chuck: Du. Du hast.. Okay. So, du hast still looks regular to me. It has that “st” ending that we learned in the last lesson.
Judith: It does. Just the beginning is not right. To be completely regular, it should be du habest. But it is du hast.
Chuck: Oh, that’s easy enough. It’s like I’m slurring the word, and the be part from habe it just gets lost.
Judith: And the formal form is completely regular again. It is Sie haben.
Chuck: Alright. So let’s have some examples on this using this verb.
Judith: Okay. This verb is very versatile. It can be used in many different situations. For example, Ich habe einen Bruder.
Chuck: I have a brother.
Judith: Haben Sie Zeit?
Chuck: “Do you have time?”
Judith: Ich habe einen Arzttermin.
Chuck: “I have a doctor’s appointment.”
Judith: Hast du Lust auf einen Kaffee?
Chuck: “Are you interested in some coffee?” Literally, “have you desire of a coffee?”
Judith: Hast du Lust auf einen Kaffee? It may sound weird to you, but this is how German uses this phrase. Now, Ich habe keine Lust zu arbeiten.
Chuck: Now, we get to the really true sentences. “I don’t feel like working.” Or literally, “I have no desire to work.”
Judith: Ich habe Hunger oder Ich habe Durst.
Chuck: “I'm hungry” or “I'm thirsty”. Literally, “I have hunger” or “I have thirst”.
Judith: As you can see, this verb is very useful to know. Be sure to get it right. For now, let’s practice by listening to the dialogue once again, this time aiming to understand everything.
Michael Schmidt: Lena, hast du noch Lust auf einen Kaffee?
Lena Wagner: Nein, ich habe jetzt einen Termin.
Michael Schmidt: Und morgen? Hast du morgen Zeit?
Lena Wagner: Nein, morgen arbeite ich.
Michael Schmidt: Und hast du am Samstag Zeit?
Lena Wagner: Nein, ich arbeite auch am Samstag.
Chuck: Now I don’t know about you, but I’d go to the Learning Center now and practice these vital questions. You never know when you might just come across somebody you’d like to meet again, especially since Germany’s full of great people.

Outro

Judith: Oh, thanks, Chuck. Well, that’s it for today’s lesson. Thank you for listening to GermanPod101.com.
Chuck: If you have any questions, feel free to use our forum or post a comment on today’s lesson. And you can also follow us on Twitter, and our account is GermanPod101. See you again soon.
Judith: [Bis bald].

44 Comments

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Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.

GermanPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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What do you think of the newbie series so far? Do you like the kind of German we teach here? Are the explanations good?

GermanPod101.com
Thursday at 9:19 am
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Hi Raja Aekant,


That is an interesting question. 👍

I would say: Hast du nicht Lust auf einen Kaffee?


Thank you.


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com


Raja Aekant
Sunday at 2:17 am
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Hast du lust auf einen Kaffee? how do i negate this question?


Hast du keinen lust auf einen kaffee? or Hast du nicht lust auf einen kaffee? which one is correct or is anyone of those is correct?

Thanks

GermanPod101.comVerified
Saturday at 9:32 pm
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Hi Judith,


Thank you for a very good question.


You are right: as a rule the German language applies the same order

of SVO, but, and that's a big BUT, the rule is by far not as rigid as in the

English language. S, V and O can if necessary be moved around to ensure

a natural flow of words within a sentence.

In the above example it is the adverbial use of "morgen" that allows the speaker

to swap verb and noun around.

And again, you are right: "Nein, ich arbeite morgen" would also be okay. By putting the

morgen first in her original sentence, she slightly emphasizes the "morgen".


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com



Judith
Friday at 4:17 am
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hi I have a question on the order of words in German. I know you mentioned that it takes the SVO order but some times i get confused. For example; why does Lena say Nein morgen arbeite ich. (morning work I) and then she can also say Nein ich arbeite auch am samstag. (no i work on saturday too) why couldnt she then say Nein ich arbeite morngen in the first sentence?? Thank you in advance for the explanation

GermanPod101.comVerified
Friday at 8:57 am
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Hi Tara,


Thank you for all your interesting questions and sorry for the late

reply.

You are right: "dies" und "das" are very similar to "this" and "that", and just as in

English I guess, it often depends a little on the context as to which one of them is a better fit.

You may also come across the words "jene, jener, jenes" for "that".

Since German and English are quite close as languages, as opposed to English and Japanese,

I think you won't find it too hard to get it right with a bit of practice, just using your "feel" from English.

As for the differences of "dies, diese and dieser", they are the different declinations of "dies", with "dies"

usually being neuter, "diese" feminine and "dieser" masculine.


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com




GermanPod101.comVerified
Wednesday at 7:09 am
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Hi Shahar,


To your first question:

Can I say "ich arbeite morgen" instead of "morgen arbeite ich"?

Both sentences are correct. It depends a little on the context as to which one is better when:

"Ich möchte heute nichts drinken. Ich arbeite morgen."

"Ich arbeite morgen, aber wie wäre es mit Donnerstag?" (making an appointment)


Can I say "ich habe einen Termin jetzt" instead of "ich habe jetzt einen Termin"?

"Ich habe jetzt einen Termin!" is probably more common, but if you wanted to

emphasize that it is now (you are in a real hurry), you might put "jetzt" at the end.


Thank you.


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com


Shahar
Monday at 1:31 am
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Hi,


Can I say "ich arbeite morgen" instead of "morgen arbeite ich"? The verb is still second...


Can I say "ich habe einen Termin jetzt" instead of "ich habe jetzt einen Termin"?


Thanks (:


Tara
Monday at 3:27 am
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Guten Tag. Ich heiße Tara Stahler. I enjoy learning other languages. Ive studied Chinese and Japanese, and thought I should try German, since that is my heritage (My father was brought to America when he was a baby, so technically, I'm the first generation born in America on my father's side.) I'm trying to understand the differences between the various demonstratives in German, but its very confusing. I believe das technically means "that", but also seems to be often used for "this" and there's various words for "this" such as dies, dieser, and diese. Could you explain the difference? Also, the word "am" if I'm understanding correctly is a contraction of "an dem," and dem doesnt seem to actually be used much, in fact, it doesnt appear in the germanpod dictionary by itself at all...

GermanPod101.comVerified
Friday at 12:47 pm
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Hi Eddie,


I'd like to recommend you to check Absolute Beginner after newbie series.


Thank you-

Jae

Team GermanPod101.com

Eddie
Friday at 5:18 pm
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Guten Tag, könnten Sie mir bitte helfen?

What should I learn next: Absolute Beginner, Beginner or Intermediate series if I finished this Newbie series?

Danke!