Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Chuck: This is Newbie Series Lesson 11.
Judith: [Willkommen zurück].
Chuck: Welcome back listeners. Glad you’re still with us for this 11th lesson. Well, Judith, what’s today’s topic?
Judith: Well, Lena and Michael are on their way to meet each other, but then Lena gets stopped on her way unexpectedly.
Chuck: Oh wait, oh wait. You mean like the police stopped her for possession of dangerous love-inducing drugs, right?
Judith: No, nothing as crazy as that. It’s simply that a tourist is asking her for directions.
Chuck: But are you sure Lena’s the right person to ask? I mean I heard you shouldn’t ask women for directions.
Judith: Stop spreading such nonsense.
Chuck: Because then we men would lose out on the fun or hours of searching. Let’s listen to the dialogue.
Judith: There’s one little problem.
Chuck: What’s that?
Judith: We are fresh out of German speaking Americans and that guy is supposed to be a tourist.
Chuck: I think I can handle the role of an American tourist in Germany. So I’ll play the part since Michael doesn’t appear in this dialogue.
Judith: Alright. Let’s go.
DIALOGUE
M: Entschuldigung, könnten Sie mir bitte helfen? Ich suche das Hofbräuhaus.
F: Das Hofbräuhaus? Das ist in München.
M: Ich komme gerade vom Flughafen. Wie komme ich zum Hofbräuhaus?
F: Gehen Sie zum Flughafen und fliegen Sie nach München.
M: Oh danke.
Judith: Now read slowly.
M: Entschuldigung, könnten Sie mir bitte helfen? Ich suche das Hofbräuhaus.
F: Das Hofbräuhaus? Das ist in München.
M: Ich komme gerade vom Flughafen. Wie komme ich zum Hofbräuhaus?
F: Gehen Sie zum Flughafen und fliegen Sie nach München.
M: Oh danke.
Judith: Now with the translation.
Judith: Entschuldigung, könnten Sie mir bitte helfen?
Chuck: Excuse me, could you please help me?
Judith: Ich suche das Hofbräuhaus.
Chuck: I am looking for the Hofbräuhaus.
Judith: Das Hofbräuhaus?
Chuck: The Hofbräuhaus?
Judith: Das ist in München.
Chuck: That’s in Munich. I am coming right from the airport.
Judith: Wie komme ich zum Hofbräuhaus?
Chuck: How do I get to the Hofbräuhaus?
Judith: Gehen Sie zum Flughafen.
Chuck: Go to the airport.
Judith: Und fliegen Sie nach München.
Chuck: And fly to Munich.
Judith: Oh danke.
Chuck: Oh, thanks.
VOCAB LIST
Judith: Now let’s have a closer look at what was said. First the vocabulary. The first word is Entschuldigung.
Chuck: Excuse me.
Judith: Entschuldigung.
Chuck: “Excuse me.” It literally means “apology”.
Judith: I’ll say it slowly for you. Ent-schul-di-gung. Entschuldigung. Next, bitte.
Chuck: Please.
Judith: bitte.
Chuck: Please.
Judith: Next, helfen.
Chuck: To help.
Judith: helfen.
Chuck: To help.
Judith: It’s really similar to the English. Now, a very common phrase that you should absolutely learn is [Entschuldigung, bitte helfen Sie mir].
Chuck: Excuse me, please help me.
Judith: Next word is suchen.
Chuck: “To search” or “look for”.
Judith: suchen.
Chuck: “To search” or “look for’.
Judith: suchen. suchen. Next, gerade.
Chuck: Just.
Judith: gerade.
Chuck: “Just” as in “I just came from the airport”.
Judith: [Ich komme gerade vom Flughafen] That brings us to the next word: vom.
Chuck: “From the” or “of the”.
Judith: vom. These are the combination of [Von] and [Dem]. [Vom] and in the phrase you also saw Flughafen.
Chuck: Airport.
Judith: Flughafen.
Chuck: Airport.
Judith: [Flughafen, Flug] means “flight” and [Hafen] means “harbor”. A harbor for flights. And what do you do at the airport? Well, for example fliegen.
Chuck: To fly.
Judith: fliegen.
Chuck: To fly.
Judith: This is a similar root as [Flug]. Just the vowel changed. Alright.
CULTURAL INSIGHTS
Chuck: But I'm a bit confused. Judith, what is the Hofbräuhaus?
Judith: You don’t know it?
Chuck: No, what it is? I live in Berlin, you know, not in Munich.
Judith: Well, I thought it was one of the things that every American has heard of or most Americans. The Hofbräuhaus is, of course, a very famous beer hall in München, Munich. I always call it München, why would you rename cities? Anyway, this Hofbräuhaus is really, really popular with tourists.
Chuck: Sounds like quite a good thing to know if I'm going to go there to celebrate Oktoberfest this year.
Judith: No, the Oktoberfest does not take place in the Hofbräuhaus. It’s in the [Wiesn], but it’s ok. Anyway, the Hofbräuhaus is very popular with tourists. And, unfortunately, some tourists think that Bavaria is all of Germany but there is a lot else.
Chuck: For example, you have the area of Germany I used to live in, near [Heidelberg], and [Heidelberg] for example is a very historical city and it has the biggest castle in Europe.
Judith: Or you could go to the area that I come from, the [Buzzling Ruhr] area. Or the nice landscapes and cycling paths of [Niederrhein]. As you can see in the first audio blog, the very first one, about my hometown, [Kamp-Lintfort]. [Kamp-Lintfort] is located right between those two big areas of metropolitan rural area and the nice landscapes of the [Niederrhein].
Chuck: Or you could come visit us in Berlin. It’s interesting because it has a bit of a small town feel, while it also has a metropolitan feel. So having lived in New York, I can find pretty much everything here that I would really want there. And it’s also very inexpensive, so you can have all the metropolitan experiences, like exotic restaurants at reasonable prices.
Judith: It’s really amazing. I love Berlin. Before I could never imagine living anywhere else, but Berlin is really cool. And then, of course, you have all of Eastern Germany, for example also [Dresden]. [Dresden] is of course famous for the [Frauenkirche], the [Zwinger], the [Semper] Opera House. There’s a lot to see there, yet I don’t see it on a lot of tourist sites.
Chuck: Then the north there’s Hamburg and [Kiel].
Judith: And Germany has islands in the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. If you want to go sea-bathing, you can do that in Germany too. And so on, and so on, there’s a lot of places in Germany to see besides Bavaria. Let me phrase that in German actually. Man könnte in Deutschland viel besuchen.
Chuck: One can visit a lot of things in Germany.
LESSON FOCUS
Judith: Let’s talk about the “could” in there. In German, the equivalent of “could” is könnte. The forms are ich könnte.
Chuck: I could.
Judith: Du könntest.
Chuck: You could. (informally)
Judith: Sie könnten.
Chuck: You could. (formally)
Judith: The forms are parallel to the ones of möchte. You’ll probably recognize them.
Chuck: And it’s used the same way too.
Judith: A very useful phrase to make a polite question is könnten Sie bitte?
Chuck: Could you please?
Judith: For example, könnten Sie bitte kommen?
Chuck: Could you please come?
Judith: Or könnten Sie bitte übersetzen?
Chuck: “Could you please translate?” But if you need a German translation, you can try our forum.
Judith: Yes, and sometimes even I am around on the forum answering questions.
Chuck: And occasionally you might catch me there too. How about we go over that dialogue again?
Judith: Sounds like a plan.
Chuck: Entschuldigung, könnten Sie mir bitte helfen? Ich suche das Hofbräuhaus.
Judith: Das Hofbräuhaus? Das ist in München.
Chuck: Ich komme gerade vom Flughafen. Wie komme ich zum Hofbräuhaus?
Judith: Gehen Sie zum Flughafen und fliegen Sie nach München.
Chuck: Oh danke.
Judith: Think he will fly to Munich now?
Chuck: I don't know. You know, he might also prefer to take a train.
Judith: Yes, the Düsseldorf airport also functions as a major train station. All the fast trains go through there.
Chuck: And if I'm not mistaken, there is even a direct train from Dusseldorf airport to Munich, even though they’re about five hours apart.
Judith: Yeah, it’s really convenient.
Chuck: Anyway, I think there’s a train heading home for me sometime soon.
OUTRO
Judith: Ok, let’s call it quits for today. We made enough progress.
Chuck: Be sure to tune in again next time.
Judith: And before that, be sure to practice what you learned today using the Learning Center.
Chuck: See you next week.
Judith: [Bis nächste Woche].

21 Comments

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GermanPod101.com
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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What is the funniest thing a tourist ever did or said to you?

GermanPod101.com
Thursday at 1:25 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Ivan,


"suchen" (+ accusative) is mostly used when you know exactly what you are looking

for: I am looking for a particular book.

"suchen nach" (+ dative) on the contrary is more commonly used in situations like:

I am looking for gold.


Thank you.


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com




GermanPod101.com
Thursday at 1:14 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Ivan,


Well spotted!👍

Of course it should read "Ich fliege nach Frankreich."


Thank you for pointing this out to us.



If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com


Ivan
Monday at 6:23 pm
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Hallo,


I use "Expansion" part that you have in app version very often, and I really like it.

Here in this lesson you say: Ich suche das Hofbräuhaus...

In example in Expansion you use: "suche nach...."

"Ich werde nach der Milch suchen"

"Suche du nach dem Brot".

When you use "suche nach" and when just "suche"?

Does after "suche nach" come Dativ, and after "suche" Nominativ?


Thanks

Ivan
Monday at 6:06 pm
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Hi,


in the example in your comment below you say:

"Ich flying nach Frankreich." - "I am flying to France"


I guess "flying" is a mistake and should be "fliege"...


br

GermanPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 7:39 pm
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Hello Nuno,


Thank you very much for your question! :smile:

"zu" or "zum" is used when you are going to visit an institution or a person.

"nach" is used if you are going to visit a country or a city.


For example:


"Ich gehe nach Dresden." - "I am going to Dresden"

"Ich flying nach Frankreich." - "I am flying to France"


Or


"Ich gehe zu meinem Bruder." - "I am going to see my brother"

"Ich gehe zur Uni." - "I am going to the university"


I hope this helps! :smile:


Kind regards,


Albert

Team GermanPod101.com

Nuno (Portugiesisch)
Monday at 4:49 pm
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Wie komme ich ZUM Hofbräuhaus?


=


Wie komme ich NACH Hofbräuhaus?


:smile:

Oktunc
Wednesday at 1:32 am
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Can we use this?


Helfen sie mir bitte?

GermanPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 3:49 pm
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Hi Richard (Schweden),


Thank you for posting.

"Learning Centre" refers to the [2.Lesson Materials] section.

Sorry for the misunderstanding!


Thank you and keep up the good work :smile::thumbsup:

Ofelia

Team GermanPod101.com

Richard (Schweden)
Monday at 4:48 am
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I never quiet understood what is it they actually refer to when they mention the "Learning Centre". Is that some compiled kind of word for the PDF and flashcard-excerssices? Or is there something actually called the "Learning Centre" on this site? :open_mouth:

GermanPod101.comVerified
Thursday at 2:56 pm
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Hi Shawn,


Yes, I feel sorry too, sometimes it's really hard to find your way in Germany.

I got lost many times already!


Thank you for your comment!

Cheers,

Mélanie

Team GermanPod101.com