Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Chuck: Chuck here. Intermediate Series Season 2, Lesson 33. Which relatives can help improve your German form? Hello and welcome back to GermanPod101.com, the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn German. I'm joined in the studio by…
Judith: Hello, everyone. Judith here.
Chuck: In this lesson you’ll learn how to fill out a form in German.
Judith: This conversation takes place at a German home.
Chuck: The conversation is between Mike and his German friend. The speakers are friends, therefore they will be speaking informal German. Now, before we listen to the conversation.
Judith: We want to ask…
Chuck: Do you read the lesson notes while you listen?
Judith: We received an email about this study tip.
Chuck: So we’re wondering if you’ve tried it, and if so…
Judith: What do you think of it?
Chuck: You can leave us feedback in the comment section of this lesson. Ok, let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
D: So, hier ist das Formular, das du ausfüllen musst.
A: Vier Seiten, wow! Hilfst du mir?
D: Natürlich.
A: Okay, Familienname?
D: Das ist dein Nachname, der Name deiner Familie.
A: Dann kommt unter Vorname 'Mike', nicht?
D: Genau.
A: Geburtsort und Geburtstag?
D: Der Ort und der Tag, an dem du geboren wurdest.
A: Staatsangehörigkeit?
D: Bedeutet das gleiche wie 'Nationalität', also schreibst du 'amerikanisch'.
A: Ahh. Ich habe noch nicht geheiratet, also ist mein Familienstand immer noch 'ledig'...
D: Ja, ich glaube ich wüsste es, wenn du hier in Deutschland geheiratet hättest.
A: Jetzt kann ich den nächsten Teil ignorieren?
D: Den über Ehegatten und Kinder? Ja, den kannst du ignorieren.
A: Dann gibt es hier Felder, in denen ich etwas zu meinen Eltern schreiben muss, das ist kein Problem. Und dann mein Pass – Mann, ist das viel Arbeit!
D: Wir sind erst bei der zweiten Seite!
Judith: Now read slowly.
D: So, hier ist das Formular, das du ausfüllen musst.
A: Vier Seiten, wow! Hilfst du mir?
D: Natürlich.
A: Okay, Familienname?
D: Das ist dein Nachname, der Name deiner Familie.
A: Dann kommt unter Vorname 'Mike', nicht?
D: Genau.
A: Geburtsort und Geburtstag?
D: Der Ort und der Tag, an dem du geboren wurdest.
A: Staatsangehörigkeit?
D: Bedeutet das gleiche wie 'Nationalität', also schreibst du 'amerikanisch'.
A: Ahh. Ich habe noch nicht geheiratet, also ist mein Familienstand immer noch 'ledig'...
D: Ja, ich glaube ich wüsste es, wenn du hier in Deutschland geheiratet hättest.
A: Jetzt kann ich den nächsten Teil ignorieren?
D: Den über Ehegatten und Kinder? Ja, den kannst du ignorieren.
A: Dann gibt es hier Felder, in denen ich etwas zu meinen Eltern schreiben muss, das ist kein Problem. Und dann mein Pass – Mann, ist das viel Arbeit!
D: Wir sind erst bei der zweiten Seite!
Judith: Now with the translation.
D: So, hier ist das Formular, das du ausfüllen musst.
D: So this is the form that you have to fill out.
A: Four pages, wow! Will you help me?
A: Vier Seiten, wow! Hilfst du mir?
D: Natürlich.
D: Of course.
A: Okay, Familienname?
A: Okay, family name?
D: Das ist dein Nachname, der Name deiner Familie.
D: That is your last name, your family's name.
A: Dann kommt unter Vorname 'Mike', nicht?
A: Then under first name I will put 'Mike', right?
D: Genau.
D: Exactly.
A: Geburtsort und Geburtstag?
A: Place of birth and birthday?
D: Der Ort und der Tag, an dem du geboren wurdest.
D: The place and the day on which you were born.
A: Staatsangehörigkeit?
A: Citizenship?
D: Bedeutet das gleiche wie 'Nationalität', also schreibst du 'amerikanisch'.
D: Means the same as 'nationality', so you'll put 'American'.
A: Ahh. Ich habe noch nicht geheiratet, also ist mein Familienstand immer noch 'ledig'...
A: Ahh. I haven't married yet, so my marital status is still 'single'…
D: Ja, ich glaube ich wüsste es, wenn du hier in Deutschland geheiratet hättest.
D: Yes, I believe I would know if you had married here in Germany.
A: Jetzt kann ich den nächsten Teil ignorieren?
A: Now can I ignore the next part?
D: Den über Ehegatten und Kinder? Ja, den kannst du ignorieren.
D: The one on spouse and children? Yes, you can ignore it.
A: Dann gibt es hier Felder, in denen ich etwas zu meinen Eltern schreiben muss, das ist kein Problem. Und dann mein Pass – Mann, ist das viel Arbeit!
A: Then there are fields here, in which I have to write something about my parents, that is not a problem. And then my passport - man, this is a lot of work!
D: Wir sind erst bei der zweiten Seite!
D: We're only on the second page!
CULTURAL INSIGHTS
Judith: Ok, how about we talk a bit about immigration in Germany.
Chuck: Sounds good. A topic I know well.
Judith: He’s trying to immigrate… Yeah. You’re trying to immigrate, what can you tell us?
Chuck: Well, immigration in Germany is still a relatively new phenomenon unlike America which is country-base of immigration.
Judith: Yeah, I know that where I come from, the Western part of Germany, with a big [Ruhrgebiet], which is one city next to the other, we’ve seen a lot of immigration in that area, of course, since the end of the Second World War, before that it was hardly anything. But now if you travel to the south, where there are a lot of rural areas, or also to the formally communist east, then foreigners will stick out, there are not all that many of them.
Chuck: It’s unfortunate politicians still refuse to acknowledge that Germany has become a country of immigration, that is a country where unrelated people would like to move to in order to improve their standard of life.
Judith: Yeah. As a result of this really stubborn mindset, most immigration laws are still geared towards people moving to Germany for other reasons, such as people trying to relocate to the country of their grandparents or also asylum seekers.
Chuck: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
Judith: First word, [Seite].
Chuck: “Side” or “page”.
Judith: [Seite, Seite] feminine, and the plural is [Seiten]. Next, [Familie].
Chuck: Family.
Judith: [Familie, Familie] also feminine, and the plural is [Familien]. Next, [Nachname].
Chuck: “Surname”, “last name” or “family name”.
Judith: [Nachname, der Nachname] And the plural is [Nachnamen]. Next, [Vorname].
Chuck: “Given name” or “first name”.
Judith: [Vorname, Vorname, der Vorname] and the plural is [Vornamen]. Next, [Geburt].
Chuck: Birth.
Judith: [Geburt, Geburt] also feminine, and the plural is [Geburten]. Next, [Geboren].
Chuck: Born.
Judith: [Geboren, geboren] Next, [Angehören].
Chuck: “To belong to”, “be part of”.
Judith: [Angehören, angehören] Next, [Heiraten].
Chuck: To marry.
Judith: [Heiraten, heiraten] Next, [Ledig].
Chuck: “Single”, as in not married.
Judith: [Ledig, ledig] Next, [Ignorieren].
Chuck: To ignore.
Judith: [Ignorieren, ignorieren] Next, [Ehegatte].
Chuck: Spouse.
Judith: [Ehegatte, Ehegatte] This word is masculine and the plural is [Ehegatten]. Next, [Pass oder Reisepass].
Chuck: Passport.
Judith: [Pass, Reisepass. Pass oder Reisepass] masculine, and the plural is [Pässe].
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Chuck: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Judith: The first word we look at is [Angehören]. This actually did not appear in the text in this form, instead we saw [Staatsangehörigkeit]. Now, how to get from [Angehören] to [Staatsangehörigkeit]? First you make an adjective out of [Angehören] so you get [Angehörig], “belonging to”. And to make a noun from that it’s [Angehörigkeit], the fact that you’re belonging to some place or somebody. And from there you go to [Staatsangehörigkeit]. [Staat] is, of course, the country or the nation, so “belonging to a nation”, “citizenship” or “nationality”. The next word is [Wüsste]. This is easy, it’s just a conditional form of [Wissen] which we hadn’t seen before. [Wüsste] with the [U Umlaut]. Finally, I want to mention that higher level English verbs are often similar in German, except that they will end in [Ieren]. For example, in German we say “Ignorieren”.
Chuck: Ignore.
Judith: [Frustrieren]
Chuck: Frustrate.
Judith: [Generieren].
Chuck: Generate.
Judith: Or [Dominieren].
Chuck: Dominate.
Judith: And there’s tons of others.

Lesson focus

Chuck: The focus of this lesson is relative clauses.
Judith: German relative clauses are formed with either the relative pronouns [Welcher, Welche, Welches] or the plain definite articles which have acquired the same function.
Chuck: In fact, the vast majority of relative clauses are now formed with [Der, Die] or [Das], acting as relative pronouns.
Judith: The clauses work in the same way as they do in English. The only difficulty is that the relative pronoun must show the same case as the word that it replaces. So, for example, you would say [Das ist der Mann den ich liebe].
Chuck: That’s the man that I love.
Judith: This relative clause could be written as a full sentence as [Ich liebe den Mann]. And [Den Mann] is accusative so the relative pronoun, [Den], has to be accusative as well. Hence, it is [Den Mann den ich liebe] instead of [Der Mann der ich liebe].
Chuck: In English, this is the distinction between who I love and whom I love. But in German these regular pronouns can match, have any case, and any gender that a definite article can match.
Judith: Some examples of sentences with relative clauses from the dialogue. First we had [Hier ist das Formular, das du ausfüllen musst].
Chuck: Here’s the form that you have to fill out.
Judith: And then [Der Ort und der Tag an dem du geboren wurdest].
Chuck: The place and the day on which you were born.
Judith: And finally we saw [Dann gibt es hier Felder in denen ich etwas zu meinen Eltern schreiben muss].
Chuck: “Then there are fields in which I must have to write something about my parents.”

Outro

Chuck: That just about does it for today. Testing yourself is one of the most effective ways to learn.
Judith: That’s why we have three types of quizzes.
Chuck: Vocabulary, grammar and content specific.
Judith: Each quiz targets a specific skill.
Chuck: And together, these quizzes will help you master several fundamental skills.
Judith: You can find them in the Learning Center at…
Chuck: GermanPod101.com . So, see you next week!
Judith: Bis nächste Woche!

11 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

GermanPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 08:02 PM
Pinned Comment
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What is your experience with forms? Have you had to fill out one in German?

GermanPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 09:51 AM
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Hi Andrey,


Thank you for your feedback.


Facelift is funny! 😄👍

We are trying to offer variety, and hope you will

like the next lesson better.


If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com

Andrey
Friday at 07:12 AM
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Your lessons urgently need a facelift. When is this lesson from, year 2000?

GermanPod101.com Verified
Monday at 02:27 AM
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Hallo robert groulx,


Danke schön for taking the time to leave us a comment. 😇

Let us know if you have any questions.


Mit freundlichen Grüßen,

Levente

Team GermanPod101.com

robert groulx
Sunday at 10:54 PM
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thanks for the lesson


my favorite words are Der Ort und der Tag an dem du geboren wurdest


robert

GermanPod101.com Verified
Monday at 03:25 PM
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Hello Walter,


Thank you for spotting that! It shold be "this book" in the English version. We have already fixed it!


Katrin

Team GermanPod101.com

Walter
Saturday at 10:33 PM
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Hello again,

as example of vocabulary, is included the next sentence:

"Die Seiten dieses Buches sind total verklebt.".

"dieses buches" is translated as "this books". Is that correct?

Thanks in advance!

Walter.

Judith
Wednesday at 12:06 AM
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Hello Archie,


As a definite article, this would be "den" (Dative plural). However, for some reason this changes to "denen" when it is a relative pronoun. This change does not occur for the singular "den" (Accusative), so I believe the purpose is to more clearly distinguish singular from plural. In relative clauses, it is otherwise hard to see which noun it refers to.


Hope this helps!


Judith

Vanessa
Tuesday at 11:03 PM
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Here is what I have read. Most of the German relative pronouns are the same as the definite articles (der, die, das, den, etc). But the dative plural is different, denen instead of den. So you have


Dann gibt es hier ein Feld, in dem ich etwas zu meinen Eltern schreiben

muss.


but


Dann gibt es hier Felder, in denen ich etwas zu meinen Eltern schreiben

muss.

Archie
Tuesday at 04:17 PM
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I've never seen the word "denen" before which is used in this dialog. Is this another example of a form of der,die,das acting as a relative pronoun. If so why isn't it simply den without the additional "en" signifiying the dative plural representing Felder. I'm confused by this usage, can you explain the construction and grammer behind it?

Vanessa
Tuesday at 04:18 AM
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Ich habe nie Formularen auf Deutsch ausgefüllt. Aber als ich im Krankenhaus war, sie hatten kein mehr Formularen auf Englisch, nur Spanisch. Ich spreche gar kein Spanisch, und das ist ungewöhnlich in diesem Ort. Das war interessant! Deutsch wäre besser gewesen.


(I have never had to fill out forms in German. But when I was in the hospital, they had no more forms in English, only Spanish. I don't speak Spanish at all, which is unusual in this area. That was interesting! German would have been better.)