Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Chuck: Chuck here. Intermediate Series Season 2, Lesson 10. Applying for a job - Part two. Hello and welcome to GermanPod101.com, the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn German.
Judith: I'm Judith and thanks again for being here with us for this Intermediate Series Season 2 Lesson.
Chuck: In this lesson you’ll learn how to write a business letter.
Judith: The use of correct form is very important.
Chuck: This conversation takes place at a German home. It is between Mike and his German friend.
Judith: It’s not much of a conversation though. Mike’s German friend is just reading out an introductory letter to go with Mike’s CV.
Chuck: The speakers are friends so they should be speaking informal German.
Judith: However, the letter they write is to a stranger, so there you will hear very formal German.
Chuck: Attention, listeners. Comment.
Judith: Comment.
Chuck: And comment some more.
Judith: It’s easy.
Chuck: And asking questions really helps improve progress. Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
D: „Meine Zielgruppe waren ausländische Studenten, die so schnell wie möglich Englisch lernen sollten, um den Vorlesungen folgen zu können. Meine Intensivkurse waren sehr erfolgreich und auch sehr beliebt.“
D: „Danach arbeitete ich weitere zwei Jahre als Sozialarbeiter für benachteiligte Jugendliche, denen ich auch neue Fähigkeiten beibringen konnte.“
D: „Aufgrund dieser Erfahrungen bin ich mir sicher, dass ich auch Ihren Kunden die englische Sprache beibringen kann. Auf eine Einladung zum Vorstellungsgespräch freue ich mich sehr.“
D: „Mit freundlichen Grüßen, Mike Marshmellow.“
Judith: Now read slowly. Jetzt langsam.
D: „Meine Zielgruppe waren ausländische Studenten, die so schnell wie möglich Englisch lernen sollten, um den Vorlesungen folgen zu können. Meine Intensivkurse waren sehr erfolgreich und auch sehr beliebt.“
D: „Danach arbeitete ich weitere zwei Jahre als Sozialarbeiter für benachteiligte Jugendliche, denen ich auch neue Fähigkeiten beibringen konnte.“
D: „Aufgrund dieser Erfahrungen bin ich mir sicher, dass ich auch Ihren Kunden die englische Sprache beibringen kann. Auf eine Einladung zum Vorstellungsgespräch freue ich mich sehr.“
D: „Mit freundlichen Grüßen, Mike Marshmellow.“
Judith: Now with the translation.
D: „Meine Zielgruppe waren ausländische Studenten, die so schnell wie möglich Englisch lernen sollten, um den Vorlesungen folgen zu können. Meine Intensivkurse waren sehr erfolgreich und auch sehr beliebt.“
D: „My target audience were foreign students, who should learn English as quickly as possible, in order to be able to follow the lectures. My intensive courses were very successful and also very popular.“
D: „Danach arbeitete ich weitere zwei Jahre als Sozialarbeiter für benachteiligte Jugendliche, denen ich auch neue Fähigkeiten beibringen konnte.“
D: „Afterwards I worked another two years as a social worker for disadvantaged youths, whom I could also teach new abilities.“
D: „Aufgrund dieser Erfahrungen bin ich mir sicher, dass ich auch Ihren Kunden die englische Sprache beibringen kann. Auf eine Einladung zum Vorstellungsgespräch freue ich mich sehr.“
D: „Because of these experiences I am sure that I can also teach English to your customers. I am looking very much forward to receiving an invitation to an interview.“
D: „Mit freundlichen Grüßen, Mike Marshmellow.“
D: „Best regards, Mike Marshmellow.“
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Chuck: Why are you calling my character Mike Marshmallow?
Judith: It’s funny, isn’t it?
Chuck: I guess so.
CULTURAL INSIGHTS
Judith: Let’s talk about German candy. I think we never talked about German candy yet.
Chuck: That works. Are you going to give me a help to help my memory of…
Judith: Well, one thing I always like to point out is that in Germany even cheap chocolate is high quality milk chocolate.
Chuck: No, I meant like you could give me some chocolate.
Judith: No, sorry, none here.
Chuck: That’s actually quite interesting that in recent fashion, chocolates with a very high quantities of cocoa become somewhat popular.
Judith: Yeah.
Chuck: Yeah. Eat those with caution, I’d say. They’re actually meant to be eaten extremely slowly, like one nibble at a time.
Judith: Yeah. That’s something for connoisseurs.
Chuck: I was once given one and I didn’t realize it was anything extra, and I took a whole block in my mouth and I almost threw up. Just so bitter.
Judith: I prefer milk chocolate and of that we have some very good…
Chuck: You are missing here. Very dearly is the combinations of peanut butter and chocolate that we have in the States so much.
Judith: You mean like peanut butter M&M’s and peanut butter Twix and whatever?
Chuck: Exactly, and like Reese’s peanut butter cups.
Judith: Yeah. I'm very glad we don’t have them over here, I don’t like them. But I guess you could send a care package to Chuck.
Chuck: Yay!
Judith: If you have any, if you have access, send them to Germany. Or if you’re visiting, bring us some and we’ll be sure to meet up.
Chuck: We could exchange some American peanut butter chocolate candy for a nice German meal.
Judith: Sounds good. I do miss authentic brownies and chocolate chip cookies. So that’s the way to get me. I tasted them in the States and now I can’t really enjoy the German ones anymore.
Chuck: Yeah, it is true that it’s practically impossible to find authentic brownies and chocolate chip cookies or cupcakes also.
Judith: On the bright side though, we have a lot more type of liquorish and gummy candy.
Chuck: It’s very true. I even shipped some over to a friend in the States once. So let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Judith: First word, [Möglich].
Chuck: Possible.
Judith: [Möglich, möglich] Next, [Vorlesung].
Chuck: Lecture.
Judith: [Vorlesung, Vorlesung] Next, [Folgen].
Chuck: To follow.
Judith: [Folgen, folgen] Next, [Intensiv]
Chuck: Intensive.
Judith: [Intensiv, intensiv] Next, [Kurs].
Chuck: Course.
Judith: [Kurs, Kurs] Next, [Erfolgreich].
Chuck: Successful.
Judith: [Erfolgreich, erfolgreich] Next, [Beliebt].
Chuck: Popular.
Judith: [Beliebt, beliebt] Next, [Danach].
Chuck: Afterwards.
Judith: [Danach, danach] Next, [Beibringen].
Chuck: To teach.
Judith: [Beibringen, beibringen] And, in this case, the [Bei] splits off. Next, [Aufgrund].
Chuck: Because of.
Judith: [Aufgrund, aufgrund] Next, [Einladen].
Chuck: To invite.
Judith: [Einladen, einladen] And also the [Ein] splits off. Next, [Vorstellungsgespräch].
Chuck: Job interview.
Judith: [Vorstellungsgespräch, Vorstellungsgespräch] This literally means “introduction” or “presentation” talk and it’s neuter, [Das Gespräch]. Next, [Gruß].
Chuck: Greeting.
Judith: [Gruß, Gruß, der Gruß] masculine. Plural, [Grüße].
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Chuck: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Judith: The first word we’ll look at is [Möglich].
Chuck: Possible.
Judith: This is used in the set phrase [So] something [Wie möglich], so that you’re expressing something has to be as good, as thoroughly or as quickly as possible. [Basically] you can place any German adjective into the blank between [So] and [Wie möglich].
Chuck: So how about if I say [So wie betrunken wie möglich].
Judith: [So betrunken wie möglich] means “as drunk as possible”. The other thing is [Der Gruß].
Chuck: The greeting.
Judith: The plural is [Grüße].
Chuck: Greetings.
Judith: When and you end the letter, just before signing you name, this verb will invariably come up. If you’re writing to a business acquaintance you should end the letter with [Mit freundlichen Grüßen].
Chuck: Which is equivalent to “best regards” but it literally means “with friendly greetings”.
Judith: Yes. And if you’re writing to friends or family that would really sound weird. You should choose a less formal phrase, maybe [Viele Grüße].
Chuck: Many greetings.
Judith: Or [Liebe Grüße]. How about some grammar?
LESSON FOCUS
Chuck: Ok. The focus of this lesson is the usage of the [Preterite] past tense. We started to cover that in the last lesson. Do you still recall how it’s formed?
Judith: For regular verbs you just do as if their stem contained an additional TE.
Chuck: Well I know you know how they’re formed. I was asking our audience.
Judith: Ok. So [Warten] behaves as if it was a verb called [Warteten, Ich wartete].
Chuck: I waited.
Judith: [Du wartetest]
Chuck: You waited.
Judith: [Er wartete].
Chuck: He waited.
Judith: [Wir warteten].
Chuck: We waited.
Judith: [Ihr wartetet].
Chuck: You all waited.
Judith: [Sie warteten]
Chuck: They waited.
Judith: There’s just one difference – instead of the expected [Er wartetet], we get [Er wartete]. And they’re also verbs with irregular stems. For example, [Ich sang].
Chuck: I sang.
Judith: Or [Ich blieb].
Chuck: I stayed.
Judith: [Ich schloss ab].
Chuck: “I closed” or “concluded”.
Judith: And since it’s just one word, separable verbs will still split off their prefix.
Chuck: Now when should you use the [Preterite] past tense and when should you use the perfect past tense?
Judith: Generally, the [Preterite] past tense is used in writing. It sounds a bit stilted if you’re saying it in speech. So, in speaking, we use the perfect past tense. However, sometimes it’s just too nice to have a short verb instead of something as [Convoluted] as [Ich bin gewesen].
Chuck: I have been.
Judith: So for the really common verbs we use the [Preterite] past tense even in speaking. So we say [Ich war].
Chuck: I was.
Judith: [Ich hatte].
Chuck: I had.
Judith: [Ich konnte].
Chuck: I could.
Judith: And so on.
OUTRO
Chuck: That just about does it for today. Premium Members, don’t forget to subscribe to our Premium Feed.
Judith: One of our most powerful web 2.0 features to date.
Chuck: The premium feed gives you the power to easily and effortlessly get all of the content.
Judith: Audio files, PDFs, videos, get everything we have.
Chuck: Everything with just a click of a button and get it through iTunes or you favorite podcast receiver.
Judith: Not a premium member and want to test it out?
Chuck: Get the Sample Feed at GermanPod101.com. See you next week!
Judith: Bis nächste Woche!

20 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters.

user profile picture
GermanPod101.com
Wednesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Kennt ihr andere Leute mit witzigen Namen?

user profile picture
Ray Shepherd
Wednesday at 4:52 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Just a small point, in your PDF Lesson Notes under "Vocab... Phrase Usage" on the second line you use the word "thoroughfully". This word doesn't exist in English, and should be either thoughtfully or thoroughly. I can see how the mistake occurred thoughly (also a made up word - should be "though"!) LOL


I do enjoy the lessons very much.

user profile picture
Germanpod101
Monday at 6:26 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

@Daniel: Thank you for the correction!


Jennifer

Team Germanpod101.com

user profile picture
Daniel Neilson
Monday at 1:46 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Aufgrund vs. wegen: "Aufgrund" would be translated "on the basis of" or "based on", and "wegen" would be "because of". And a tiny correction to the text...it's "marshmallow", not "marshmellow", although everyone pronounces it just like you spelled it. It's a marsh plant that has a white puffy top which looks just like the candy.

user profile picture
Team GermanPod101.com
Thursday at 9:17 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hallo Antonio,


Danke für deine Frage!


"Aufgrund" und "wegen" können beide mit "because of" übersetzt werden und sind oft austauschbar, aber "aufgrund" ist etwas formaler als "wegen". Es passt also gut in den Zusammenhang hier. Würde man mit seinen Freunden sprechen und erklären, dass man nach Hause muss, um sich um seinen Hund zu kümmern, würde man sagen "wegen meines Hundes." und nicht "aufgrund meines Hundes."


Vielen Dank!


Clara

Team GermanPod101.com

user profile picture
Antonio
Sunday at 5:29 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hallo,


ist "aufgrund" austauschbar mit "wegen"?


Danke im Voraus.


Grüsse,


Antonio

user profile picture
GermanPod101.com
Friday at 6:14 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Tzu-Ling,


Thank you for asking!

There is not much difference between the two words, both can mean "to teach" and "to tell (somebody something)".

I hope this helps!


Katrin

Team GermanPod101.com

user profile picture
Tzu-Ling
Tuesday at 11:50 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

What's the difference between "beibringen" and "unterrichten? Thanks

user profile picture
GermanPod101.com
Monday at 6:28 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Mihaela,


Thank you so much for your nice feedback!

If you've got any questions about (technical) German language, feel free to ask away!


Again, thank you!


Katrin

Team GermanPod101.com

user profile picture
mihaela nedelcu
Monday at 4:07 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

thank you so much.. you are effective ..exactly what I need ..can you help me with technical German language ?

user profile picture
GermanPod101.com
Tuesday at 10:23 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello mark,


Pets are not allowed inside the studio, it must be the background music sound:mrgreen:


Cheers,

Neha

Team GermanPod101.com