Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to GermanPod101.com. This is Business German for Beginners Season 1 Lesson 8 - Leaving Your German Office At the End of the Day. John Here.
Jennifer: Guten Tag! I'm Jennifer.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn what to say when you leave the office after work. The conversation takes place in the office.
Jennifer: It's between Linda Müller and Stefan Herzog.
John: The speakers are co-workers, so they will use informal German. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Stefan Herzog: Ich bin fertig für heute. Hast du noch viel zu tun?
Linda Müller: Nicht viel...vielleicht noch eine halbe Stunde.
Stefan Herzog: Ok, dann sehen wir uns morgen.
Linda Müller: Bis morgen! Tschüss!
John: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Stefan Herzog: Ich bin fertig für heute. Hast du noch viel zu tun?
Linda Müller: Nicht viel...vielleicht noch eine halbe Stunde.
Stefan Herzog: Ok, dann sehen wir uns morgen.
Linda Müller: Bis morgen! Tschüss!
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation
Stefan Herzog: I'm done for today. Do you still have a lot to do?
Linda Müller: Not much ... maybe about half an hour.
Stefan Herzog: OK, then I'll see you tomorrow.
Linda Müller: See you tomorrow! Bye!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: Linda has finished work for the day, but Stefan is still working hard.
Jennifer: Not for much longer though, hopefully!
John: What are the usual working hours in Germany?
Jennifer: Working conditions are regulated by the German Civil Code. The official maximum number of hours is 10 working hours a day.
John: What happens if someone works over that?
Jennifer: If they work longer than their contract specifies, then the employer has to pay overtime.
John: Can the extra hours be made up as time off?
Jennifer: Yes, that’s possible.
John: Is overtime mandatory?
Jennifer: Well, there are a lot of employees who seem to think that they must work over 10 hours a day for the sake of their careers.
John: What is the German word for “overtime”?
Jennifer: There are two German words that translate to the English “overtime”: Überstunden and Mehrarbeit. Überstunden are not agreed upon in the contract while Mehrarbeit means that the overtime hours are regulated by law.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Jennifer: viel [natural native speed]
John: much, a lot
Jennifer: viel[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jennifer: viel [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Jennifer: vielleicht [natural native speed]
John: maybe
Jennifer: vielleicht[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jennifer: vielleicht [natural native speed]
John: Next we have..
Jennifer: sehen [natural native speed]
John: to see
Jennifer: sehen[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jennifer: sehen [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Jennifer: morgen [natural native speed]
John: tomorrow
Jennifer: morgen[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jennifer: morgen [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Jennifer: viel
John: meaning "a lot of"
John: What can you tell us about this?
Jennifer: This is an adverb. You can use it to talk about a large number of things, without specifying the number.
John: And how do you use it?
Jennifer: If it’s a singular noun, you use viel, as in viel Geld.
John: Which means “lots of money”. And if it’s a plural noun?
Jennifer: It’s viele, as in viele Häuser.
John: Meaning “A lot of houses”. Can you give us an example using this word?
Jennifer: Sure. For example, you can say.. Ich habe viele Projekte.
John: ...which means "I have lots of projects.” Okay, what's the next word?
Jennifer: vielleicht
John: meaning "maybe"
John: What can you tell us about this?
Jennifer: This is another adverb, and you use it quite often.
John: How do you use it in a sentence?
Jennifer: It can be placed at the beginning, such as Vielleicht schaffe ich es
John: “Maybe I can make it”.
Jennifer: Or in the middle, Ich habe vielleicht etwas falsch gemacht
John: Meaning “I maybe made a mistake.” Can you give us an example using this word?
Jennifer: Sure. For example, you can say.. Vielleicht schaffe ich es.
John: .. which means "Maybe I can make it." Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about what to say when you leave the office after work. I guess you don’t need to say something when you leave work, but it’s polite, isn’t it?
Jennifer: Yes. I think it’s best too. Of course, you can just Auf Wiedersehen, but there are nicer phrases to use if you’re leaving while your co-workers are still busy.
John: Like Linda did, in the dialogue.
Jennifer: Right. She said Ich bin fertig für heute. Hast du noch viel zu tun?
John: “I'm done for today. Do you still have a lot to do?” Let’s look at that sentence in more detail.
Jennifer: für heute means “for today” and it is a preposition and temporal adverb.
John: Can we switch in other words for time?
Jennifer: Of course! You can say für diese Woche
John: “For this week.”
Jennifer: The second sentence is Hast du noch viel zu tun?
John: “Do you still have a lot to do?”
Jennifer: noch is an adverb, with the meaning of “still” or “not yet”.
John: Are there any other words in that sentence that are important?
Jennifer: Yes, hast is very important. That’s a conjugation of haben, an irregular verb that means “to have”.
John: Can you give us an example of a conjugation for it?
Jennifer: Sure. Ich habe.
John: “I have.”
Jennifer: Or Wir haben.
John: “We have”. There are examples of the other conjugations in the lesson notes, so check them out.
Jennifer: Yes, please do!
John: So we’ve asked our co-worker if they have much to do and they’ve said, like Stefan in the conversation, that they don’t.
Jennifer: We can then say Ok, dann sehen wir uns morgen.
John: “Ok, so I’ll see you tomorrow.” This is very similar to “See you then” in English.
Jennifer: Yes, it’s a pretty generic expression that you can use in situations like this.
John: So it’s definitely a phrase to try and remember!

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Jennifer: Auf Wiedersehen!

5 Comments

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GermanPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Let's practice together in the comments!

GermanPod101.comVerified
Saturday at 5:28 am
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Hallo robert groulx,


Danke schön for posting and studying with us. If you have any questions, please let us know.😄


Kind regards,

Levente

Team GermanPod101.com

robert groulx
Saturday at 3:26 am
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thank you for the lesson transcript


robert

GermanPod101.com
Wednesday at 8:04 am
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Hi Mauricio,


That is an interesting question.👍


"eine halbe Stunde" because it is "die Stunde".

"einen halben Tag" because it is "der Tag".

The correct sentence would therefore be:

"vielleicht noch einen halben Tag."


Thank you.


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com



Mauricio
Friday at 1:22 am
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Hallo,

So in the sentence "vielleicht noch eine halbe Stunde." which case is being used? If one used "Tag" instead of "Stunde", would the correct be "vielleicht noch ein halb Tag." or "vielleicht einen halb Tag"? Or other?

Danke,

Mauricio