Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John: Hi everyone, and welcome back to GermanPod101.com. This is Business German for Beginners Season 1 Lesson 19 - Arriving Late at an Appointment and Notifying the Receptionist. John Here.
Jennifer: Guten Tag! I'm Jennifer.
John: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to inform a receptionist about an appointment. The conversation takes place in the lobby.
Jennifer: It's between a receptionist and Linda Müller.
John: The speakers are strangers, therefore, they will speak formal German. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Rezeptionist: Guten Abend.
Linda Müller: Guten Abend. Ich bin Linda Müller von der firma ABC. Ich habe einen Termin mit Herrn Paul Schmitt um fünf Uhr. Ich habe heute Morgen angerufen.
Rezeptionist: Lassen Sie mich kurz nachsehen. Bitte nehmen Sie Platz in der Lobby.
John: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Rezeptionist: Guten Abend.
Linda Müller: Guten Abend. Ich bin Linda Müller von der firma ABC. Ich habe einen Termin mit Herrn Paul Schmitt um fünf Uhr. Ich habe heute Morgen angerufen.
Rezeptionist: Lassen Sie mich kurz nachsehen. Bitte nehmen Sie Platz in der Lobby.
John: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Receptionist: Good evening.
Linda Müller: Good evening, I'm Linda Müller from ABC. I have an appointment with Mr. Smith at five o'clock. I called this morning.
Receptionist: Let me quickly check. Please take a seat in the hall.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John: Linda seems to be having a lot of business meetings lately.
Jennifer: Yes, she’s very busy! I hope that means her company is doing well.
John: I hope so too. This time she had to speak to a receptionist to say she had arrived, ready for her meeting.
Jennifer: Yeah, it’s quite common for big companies to have receptionists.
John: I think that they’re needed in big companies and places like hotels.
Jennifer: Definitely. That’s where you’ll usually find them in Germany.
John: What are the typical duties of a receptionist in Germany?
Jennifer: As we saw in the conversation, they greet visitors and give them directions.
John: Not just directions to places, but things like asking visitors to wait or to do certain actions.
Jennifer: Yes, there might be check-in procedures or different departments might have different policies. A receptionist can help visitors with this.
John: Keeping up with procedures and rules is important.
Jennifer: Yes. Receptionists are also there to help the visitors and have things ready for them too.
John: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Jennifer: Guten Abend [natural native speed]
John: good evening
Jennifer: Guten Abend[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jennifer: Guten Abend [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Jennifer: fünf Uhr [natural native speed]
John: five o'clock
Jennifer: fünf Uhr[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jennifer: fünf Uhr [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Jennifer: heute Morgen [natural native speed]
John: this morning
Jennifer: heute Morgen[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jennifer: heute Morgen [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Jennifer: kurz [natural native speed]
John: short, brief; briefly
Jennifer: kurz[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jennifer: kurz [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Jennifer: nachsehen [natural native speed]
John: to check
Jennifer: nachsehen[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jennifer: nachsehen [natural native speed]
John: Next we have...
Jennifer: Platz nehmen [natural native speed]
John: to take a seat
Jennifer: Platz nehmen[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jennifer: Platz nehmen [natural native speed]
John: And last...
Jennifer: Termin [natural native speed]
John: appointment
Jennifer: Termin[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jennifer: Termin [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Jennifer: der Termin
John: meaning "the appointment." What can you tell us about this word?
Jennifer: This is a masculine noun.
John: And it means “an appointment?”
Jennifer: Literally, it means “a fixed time.”
John: Is it only used for business appointments?
Jennifer: No, it can be used for medical appointments and dates too.
John: Can you give it to us in a sentence?
Jennifer: Sure. For example, you can say, Am besten legen wir einen Termin fest.
John: ...which means "The best is to fix a date."
John: Okay, what's the next phrase?
Jennifer: Platz nehmen
John: meaning "to take a seat." Can you break this down for us?
Jennifer: Der Platz means "the seat." And nehmen means "to take."
John: Literally, “to take a seat.”
Jennifer: You can also say sich setzen, meaning "to sit."
John: Is there anything special about this phrase?
Jennifer: Nehmen usually means "to give." Its meaning only changes in this phrase.
John: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Jennifer: Sure. For example, you can say, Bitte nehmen Sie Platz.
John: ...which means "Please take a seat."
John: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John: In this lesson, you'll learn about informing a receptionist of an appointment. First, I think you need to introduce yourself to the receptionist.
Jennifer: Yes, you do. Linda said Guten Abend. Ich bin Linda Müller von der Firma ABC.
John: “Good evening, I'm Linda Müller from ABC.” So she started with a greeting.
Jennifer: Then she gave her name, using Ich bin. Finally, she introduced her company with von der Firma.
John: Are there other ways to introduce your firm?
Jennifer: You can also say Ich arbeite für die Firma ABC. This makes your relationship to your company seem more distant though.
John: Oh, so the first one shows a closer relationship with your company and your identity with it.
Jennifer: Yes. You can use either in a business situation.
John: Okay. Next, how do we say that we have an appointment?
Jennifer: Linda said, Ich habe einen Termin mit Herrn Paul Schmitt um fünf Uhr.
John: “I have an appointment with Mr. Smith at five o'clock.”
Jennifer: First is “I have,” which is Ich habe.
John: Next was “an appointment.”
Jennifer: einen Termin. Then was mit and the dative object, in this case a name. Finally, was um and the time.
John: Let’s hear another example. How can we say “I have a meeting with Mr Schulze.”
Jennifer: Ich habe eine Besprechung mit Herrn Schulze.
John: After we’ve introduced ourselves and our appointment, the receptionist will probably give us some instructions.
Jennifer: Yes, it’s likely that the receptionist will use the polite imperative.
John: This is used to give commands or make polite requests.
Jennifer: Yes, you can make it into a polite request by adding bitte. There is also a formal imperative for people that you would address with Sie.
John: How does the formal imperative work?
Jennifer: It’s the same as the formal present tense: The verb comes first and next, Sie. For example, Gehen Sie!
John: Which means “go!”
Jennifer: Another example is Kommen Sie!
John: Which means “come!”

Outro

John: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Jennifer: Auf Wiedersehen!

7 Comments

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GermanPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Can you write a sentence in German using the imperative?

GermanPod101.com Verified
Friday at 06:59 PM
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Hallo robert groulx,


Danke schön for posting and studying with us. If you have any questions, please let us know.😄


Kind regards,

Levente

Team GermanPod101.com

robert groulx
Friday at 09:11 AM
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thank you for the lesson transcript


Ich habe einen Termin mit Herrn Paul Schmitt um fünf Uhr.


robert

GermanPod101.com Verified
Friday at 08:13 AM
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Hi John,


Thanks for your feedback!😉


Yes, you are right: strictly speaking they should be saying 17:00.


On the other hand, if both parties understand that it is 5 o'clock in the

afternoon they are referring to, you will find that in spoken German the

"easier" version is often preferred.


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com

John Bohlert
Monday at 10:36 AM
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If the appointment is in Germany, funf would be am, if it's at 5 pm then the time would be siebzehn as Germany goes by 24 hour time.

GermanPod101.com
Thursday at 09:35 AM
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Hello Тарык,


Thank you:

Lassen Sie mich kurz darüber nachdenken. Ja, ich kann zu Ihnen sagen, dass Sie herkommen, bitte.


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com


Тарык
Saturday at 11:49 AM
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Lassen Sie mich Kurz über das denken. Ja, ich kann zu Sie sagen, dass kommen Sie hier, bitte.