Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Chuck: Chuck here. Beginner series, Season 2, Lesson #39. You Can't Fathom Doing More Than a Single Thing in Germany without First Learning This! Hello and welcome to germanpod101.com, the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn German.
Judith: I am Judith and thanks again for being here with us for this beginner series, season 2 lesson.
Chuck: In this lesson, you will learn how to express pity in Germany.
Judith: Also you will learn the words for some clothes.
Chuck: This conversation takes place at a German hotel. The conversation is between Caroline and Martin, two American tourists.
Judith: Later, they will be joined by another hotel guest.
Chuck: Caroline and Martin are friends. Therefore they will be speaking informal German to each other and formally to another guest. Now if you are listening on an iPod
Judith: Or an iPod Touch or iPhone
Chuck: Click the center button of the iPod or tap the screen on an iPod Touch or iPhone to see the notes for this lesson while you listen.
Judith: Read along while you listen.
Chuck: This technique will help you remember faster. Okay let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Caroline: Verdammt! Ich kann meine Zahnbürste nicht mehr finden.
Martin: Bist du sicher, dass sie nicht in einem deiner Koffer ist? Nimm doch alles einmal heraus.
Caroline: Okay... T-Shirts, Hosen, Röcke, Kleider, Handtücher...
Martin: Mann, was trägst du alles mit dir herum!
Caroline: Bücher, Geld, Familienfotos, Fahrkarten…
Martin: Wow...
Caroline: Das ist alles, siehst du? Meine Zahnbürste ist weg.
Martin: Na, das Hotel gibt dir sicher eine Zahnbürste für heute.
Caroline: Meinst du? Die Frau war so unhöflich!
Martin: Hmm, vielleicht ist es doch besser, erst einen Hotelgast zu fragen. Ah, da ist einer!
Caroline: Entschuldigung, haben Sie vielleicht eine Zahnbürste übrig?
Gast: Hmm...
Caroline: Ich kann meine Zahnbürste einfach nicht mehr finden.
Martin: Wir waren lange unterwegs und jetzt haben die Geschäfte schon zu und wir können keine Zahnbürste kaufen.
Gast: Ich glaube ich habe eine, lasst mich mal sehen.
Judith: Now it’s slowly.
Caroline: Verdammt! Ich kann meine Zahnbürste nicht mehr finden.
Martin: Bist du sicher, dass sie nicht in einem deiner Koffer ist? Nimm doch alles einmal heraus.
Caroline: Okay... T-Shirts, Hosen, Röcke, Kleider, Handtücher...
Martin: Mann, was trägst du alles mit dir herum!
Caroline: Bücher, Geld, Familienfotos, Fahrkarten…
Martin: Wow...
Caroline: Das ist alles, siehst du? Meine Zahnbürste ist weg.
Martin: Na, das Hotel gibt dir sicher eine Zahnbürste für heute.
Caroline: Meinst du? Die Frau war so unhöflich!
Martin: Hmm, vielleicht ist es doch besser, erst einen Hotelgast zu fragen. Ah, da ist einer!
Caroline: Entschuldigung, haben Sie vielleicht eine Zahnbürste übrig?
Gast: Hmm...
Caroline: Ich kann meine Zahnbürste einfach nicht mehr finden.
Martin: Wir waren lange unterwegs und jetzt haben die Geschäfte schon zu und wir können keine Zahnbürste kaufen.
Gast: Ich glaube ich habe eine, lasst mich mal sehen.
Judith: Now with the translation.
Caroline: Verdammt! Ich kann meine Zahnbürste nicht mehr finden.
Caroline: Damn! I can't find my toothbrush anymore.
Martin: Bist du sicher, dass sie nicht in einem deiner Koffer ist? Nimm doch alles einmal heraus.
Martin: Are you sure that it isn't in one of your suitcases? How'bout you take everything out once.
Caroline: Okay... T-Shirts, Hosen, Röcke, Kleider, Handtücher...
Caroline: Okay... t-shirts, trousers, skirts, dresses, towels...
Martin: Mann, was trägst du alles mit dir herum!
Martin: Man, what are you carrying around with you!
Caroline: Bücher, Geld, Familienfotos, Fahrkarten…
Caroline: Books, money, family photos, tickets…
Martin: Wow...
Martin: Wow…
Caroline: Das ist alles, siehst du? Meine Zahnbürste ist weg.
Caroline: That's all, see? My toothbrush is gone.
Martin: Na, das Hotel gibt dir sicher eine Zahnbürste für heute.
Martin: Well, the hotel will surely give you a toothbrush for today.
Caroline: Meinst du? Die Frau war so unhöflich!
Caroline: You think so? The woman was so impolite!
Martin: Hmm, vielleicht ist es doch besser, erst einen Hotelgast zu fragen. Ah, da ist einer!
Martin: Hmm, maybe it is better to first ask a hotel guest. Ah, there's one!
Caroline: Entschuldigung, haben Sie vielleicht eine Zahnbürste übrig?
Caroline: Excuse me, do you maybe have an extra toothbrush?
Gast: Hmm...
Guest: Hmm…
Caroline: Ich kann meine Zahnbürste einfach nicht mehr finden.
Caroline: I just can't find my toothbrush anymore.
Martin: Wir waren lange unterwegs und jetzt haben die Geschäfte schon zu und wir können keine Zahnbürste kaufen.
Martin: We've been on the road for a long time and now the shops are already closed and we can't buy a toothbrush.
Gast: Ich glaube ich habe eine, lasst mich mal sehen.
Guest: I believe I have one, let me see.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Judith: Talking about the shops being closed, Germany has quite a few different opening hours than America.
Chuck: Yeah I will certainly say so. Germans aren’t used to having shops that are open every day or all day. That’s very recent thing and only available in the larger cities.
Judith: Yeah typically shops are open Monday to Friday from 9 AM to 8 PM, maybe even only till 6 PM if you are in the small town.
Chuck: Yeah often too, they even have lunch hours that they are not in for say a couple of hours like from noon to 2.
Judith: Yeah so that the shop owners can have some lunch if they also work in the shops. On Saturday, opening hours may also be reduced and nothing is open on Sundays. This means that on Saturday, many people rush to the shops to get supplies for Sunday. If you can at all avoid it, don’t go shopping on Saturdays.
Chuck: Yeah so if you are in a smaller city and say 2 o’ clock rolls around, you pretty much won’t be able to get anything until Monday morning.
Judith: If you absolutely need to buy something afterhours, there are kiosks in some regions. They mainly stock sweets, cigarettes and booze but also limited supply of emergency household items. These kiosks are not bound to regular opening hours.
Chuck: But one other thing to remember is that restaurants are open on Sundays but that means that they are typically closed on Mondays or possibly another day of the week. So it’s good to make sure to check the opening hours of the restaurant before you go. Also restaurants aren’t typically open in the mornings and may not be open for lunch and if they are, they are likely closed say between 2 and 5 and only reopen for dinner afterwards.
Judith: As most Germans adhere rather strictly to their lunch hours, it’s only a problem for foreigners and workaholics.
Chuck: Yeah but one thing you will notice though is usually in smaller cities, you can find say the foreign foods at these kind of hours like the Chinese or kebab.
Judith: Yeah but they are not very authentic. So you really should try to eat German food at the German hours.
Chuck: One more thing to remember is that it’s pretty rare in Germany to eat breakfast out. Well I’d say unless you are meeting with a business partner.
Judith: And keep in mind that German breakfast usually isn’t warm and you can’t get pancakes for example for breakfast. If you want to eat out for breakfast, a café or a bakery is your best bet.
Chuck: And if you really have to have that one breakfast and you have the money, you can always stop by a hotel. That usually works but don’t expect it to be cheap. So let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Judith: First word [Zahnbürste]
Chuck: Toothbrush.
Judith: [Zahnbürste, Zahnbürste, die Zahnbürste] It’s feminine and the plural is [Zahnbürsten] Next [Koffer]
Chuck: Suitcase.
Judith: [Koffer, Koffer] This word is masculine and the plural is the same. Next [Raus] or [Heraus]
Chuck: Out of
Judith: [Raus, heraus, raus, heraus] Next [Hose]
Chuck: Trousers or pants.
Judith: [Hose, Hose, die Hose] And the plural is [Hosen]. Next [Rock]
Chuck: Skirt.
Judith: [Rock, Rock] Masculine and the plural is [Röcke] Next [Handtuch]
Chuck: Towel
Judith: [Handtuch, Handtuch, das Handtuch] And the plural is [Handtücher] Next [Herum]
Chuck: Around.
Judith: [Herum, herum] Next [Foto]
Chuck: Photo.
Judith: [Foto, Foto, das Foto] And the plural is [Fotos]. Next [Weg]
Chuck: Gone, not there or away.
Judith: [Weg, Weg] Next [Unhöflich]
Chuck: Impolite.
Judith: [Unhöflich, unhöflich] And the opposite is [Höflich] polite. Next [Gast]
Chuck: Guest.
Judith: [Gast, Gast] This word is masculine and the plural is [Gäste]. Lastly we have [Geschäft]
Chuck: Shop.
Judith: [Geschäft, Geschäft, das Geschäft] And the plural is [Geschäfte].
Chuck: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Judith: The first word we look at is [Heraus].
Chuck: Out of.
Judith: This is used to form a lot of separable German verbs. For example, [Herausnehmen]
Chuck: To take something out.
Judith: [Herausgeben]
Chuck: To give out.
Judith: [Herauskommen]
Chuck: To come out.
Judith: [Herausgehen]
Chuck: To go out like our building.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Judith: And so on. In colloquial speech, it’s shortened to just raus. And the other point I wanted to make is about [Herum]
Chuck: Around.
Judith: This too is used for German verbs but less commonly. For example in, [Herumgehen]
Chuck: To go around.
Judith: Or [Herumsehen]
Chuck: To look around.
LESSON FOCUS
Chuck: For the grammar point, we are going to be talking about other ways of forming the plural.
Judith: So far, we’ve talked about German nouns which form the plural by not changing at all like [Der Koffer] and the plural [Die Koffer]. There are also those which add an S like in English like [Das T-Shirt, das Foto] and there are those which add an N or en like also [Die Hose, die Hose, die Hosen, die Zahnbürste, die Zahnbürsten]
Chuck: Now let’s look at the last two common ways of forming the plural.
Judith: Masculine words and some non-masculine ones often add E. As before, you may additionally see one of the vowels become an umlaut vowel.
Chuck: Give me an example.
Judith: Sure. In this lesson, we’ve seen [Das Geschäft] and the plural is [Die Geschäfte] Also [Der Rock, die Rücke] skirts and [Der Gast, die Gäste] guests.
Chuck: Neuter words will often add er. Again you may see the vowel change in addition. Some examples.
Judith: [Das Kleid, die Kleider] Dresses [Das Handtuch, die Handtücher] towels [Das Buch, die Bücher] books.
OUTRO
Chuck: The most important thing is to learn the plural form of the noun at the same time as you learn the noun. That way, you won’t have to guess what kind of plural it will form. You notice always in germanpod101, we tell you the plural every time you learn a noun. Well that just about does it for today. Testing yourself is one of the most efficient ways to learn.
Judith: That’s why we have three types of quizzes.
Chuck: Vocabulary, grammar and content specific.
Judith: Each quiz targets specific skill
Chuck: And together these quizzes will help you master several fundamental skills.
Judith: You can find them in the learning center at
Chuck: Germanpod101.com. So see you next week.
Judith: [Bis nächste Woche].

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GermanPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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GermanPod101.com
Tuesday at 1:00 am
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Hello Nasztaszja,


Thank you very much for your question and your kind feedback! :smile:

Yes, there is definitely a difference between these words.

"auskommen" means "to handle" or "to manage" something, whereas "herauskommen" means "to come out" or "to come up" with something.


The word "ausgeben" means "to spend" or "to output" something, whereas "herausgeben" means "to issue" or "to release". I hope this helps!:thumbsup:


Kind regards,


Albert

Team GermanPod101.com

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nasztaszja
Tuesday at 5:32 am
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Hallo! :)


I have a question:

Is there any difference between auskommen and herauskommen?

And ausgeben and herausgeben?

Thank you for the answer!


Great lessons, by the way :)

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GermanPod101.com
Monday at 1:06 am
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Hello Vivien,


Vielen Dank für Deinen Kommentar! :smile::thumbsup:

We are glad that you like our lessons!

Please let me correct a small mistake. "Ich mag all Lektions in Beginner" should be "Ich mag alle Beginner Lektionen".


Have a great day! :smile:


Vielen Dank!


Albert

Team GermanPod101.com

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Vivien
Friday at 7:00 pm
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:smile::thumbsup: Ich mag alle Lektions in Beginner. Sie sind interessant und praktisch.

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GermanPod101.com
Monday at 9:15 pm
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Hallo Margaret,


Thank you for your comment!


We are glad to hear it all worked out.


If you have any questions, please let us know!


Vielen Dank!


Clara

Team GermanPod101.com

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Margaret Carpenter
Saturday at 2:49 am
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never mind. just figured out how to get there.

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Margaret Carpenter
Saturday at 2:49 am
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I've tried 2 days in a row, but I cannot get to the Lesson Materials for this lesson. First time this has happened to me.

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GermanPod101.com
Tuesday at 1:05 pm
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Hi Julian,


Thank you very much for your nice feedback!


When a verb is used with "zu" it is called an "Infinitivgruppe". An example for this would be "Ich habe vor, heute Abend zu kochen." (I am planning on cooking this evening." It depends on the structure of the sentence though, as "kochen" (to cook) can also be used on its own in other sentences. "Ich koche gerne." (I like to cook.)


When it comes to "dass" or "das", the best way to check whether you are using the correct one is to ask yourself whether or not you could replace "das/s" with "dieses/jenes" (this). If so, you use "das". If not, you use "dass". So it would be "Ich freue mich, dass ich das machen kann" (I am happy that I am able to do this.) You can say "Ich freue mich, dass ich dieses/jenes machen kann." but you can't replace the "dass" with dieses/jenes.


I hope this helps!


Thank you!


Clara

Team GermanPod101.com

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Julian
Sunday at 9:59 pm
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Hallo GermanPod101.com ,


Very good season ! I like it !


I have some question : - when exactely we use the preposition "zu" near a verb ? ?

- and when we use "dass" and "das" ???


Thank you !


Best regards,


Iulian Zaharescu

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Nevena
Sunday at 3:24 am
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Oh mein Gott! I suppose this is flexible German grammar, that we should love so much :wink:

Thanks Judith for the explanation, thanks Salivia for a huge effort!


So this is Genitive + Dative combination (I got it), but I suppose this is not linked to two attributes that have to be put together. (Die Schlüssel findest du in meinem roten Koffer). Please, correct me if I'm wrong.


Thanks for everything,

N.