Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Chuck: Chuck here. Beginner series, Season 2, Lesson #20. How is Your German Future Looking? Hello and welcome to the beginner series, season 2, at germanpod101.com where we study modern German in a fun and educational format.
Judith: So brush up on the German that you started learning long ago or start learning today.
Chuck: Thanks for being here with us for this lesson. Judith, what are we looking at in this lesson?
Judith: In this lesson, you will learn how to talk about the future in German.
Chuck: This conversation takes place in a German street between a German guy and a girl. The speakers are friends. Therefore they will be speaking informal German.
Judith: Listeners, I have a question.
Chuck: A question!
Judith: Yep I want to know when was the last time you commented
Chuck: Oh yeah.
Judith: Stop by germanpod101.com, leave us a comment or just say hi.
Chuck: All right. You are Judith. Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
J: Hey! … Hey! Geh nicht einfach weiter!
C: Lass mich in Ruhe!
J: Was?? Was ist los? Du siehst nicht gut aus.
C: Ich bin traurig.
J: Warum?
C: Mein scheiß Chef braucht mich übermorgen im Büro.
J: Und?
C: Übermorgen ist das Fußballspiel. Ich werde es nicht sehen können.
J: Oh Mann.
C: Wenn die übermorgen spielen, werde ich im Büro sitzen und arbeiten.
J: Scheiß Chef.
J: Und was ist mit den Karten?
C: Meine Frau wird sich das Spiel allein angucken. Die andere Karte werde ich vielleicht verkaufen.
J: Ich nehme sie sofort!
Judith: Now it’s slowly.
J: Hey! … Hey! Geh nicht einfach weiter!
C: Lass mich in Ruhe!
J: Was?? Was ist los? Du siehst nicht gut aus.
C: Ich bin traurig.
J: Warum?
C: Mein scheiß Chef braucht mich übermorgen im Büro.
J: Und?
C: Übermorgen ist das Fußballspiel. Ich werde es nicht sehen können.
J: Oh Mann.
C: Wenn die übermorgen spielen, werde ich im Büro sitzen und arbeiten.
J: Scheiß Chef.
J: Und was ist mit den Karten?
C: Meine Frau wird sich das Spiel allein angucken. Die andere Karte werde ich vielleicht verkaufen.
J: Ich nehme sie sofort!
Judith: Now with the translation.
J: Hey! … Hey! Geh nicht einfach weiter!
J: Hey! … Hey! Don't just walk on!
C: Lass mich in Ruhe!
C: Leave me be!
J: Was?? Was ist los? Du siehst nicht gut aus.
J: What?? What's up? You're not looking good.
C: Ich bin traurig.
C: I am sad.
J: Warum?
J: Why?
C: Mein scheiß Chef braucht mich übermorgen im Büro.
C: My shitty boss needs me in the office day after tomorrow.
J: Und?
J: And?
C: Übermorgen ist das Fußballspiel. Ich werde es nicht sehen können.
C: The soccer match is day after tomorow. I will not be able to see it.
J: Oh Mann.
J: Aw man!
C: Wenn die übermorgen spielen, werde ich im Büro sitzen und arbeiten.
C: When they are playing day after tomorrow, I will be sitting in the office and working.
J: Scheiß Chef.
J: Darn boss.
J: Und was ist mit den Karten?
J: And what's with the tickets?
C: Meine Frau wird sich das Spiel allein angucken. Die andere Karte werde ich vielleicht verkaufen.
C: My wife will watch the match alone. Perhaps I will sell the other ticket.
J: Ich nehme sie sofort!
J: I will take it immediately!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Judith: Let’s learn more about soccer. Typical German National League Soccer Stadium has space for more than 60,000 people.
Chuck: And note that it’s perfectly fine to have standing room as well not just seats. So be careful when buying tickets. Once we went to an ice hockey game and well, let’s just say we went in the wrong side of the arena because it was a standing room and I totally didn’t realize that you could even get standing room tickets.
Judith: Seats at the National League game range from 25 year olds to 40 and of course, it depends on where the match takes place and who is playing.
Chuck: Note that unlike in the states, at the beginning of the match, the German national anthem is not typically played, well, unless it’s an international match.
Judith: The most important leagues from a German point of view are the Bundesliga, that’s the Federal league, the [UEFA] Champions League, The European Championship and the world cup. Germany is big in soccer and has won the world cup several times. Soccer is big in most of Europe as well as South America.
Chuck: For those not aware, note that each soccer team has 11 active players but more maybe in reserve willing to play later. This is not just true in Germany but in other countries too. The match is divided into two halves of 45 minutes each with a half time break of up to 15 minutes in between. Note that unlike in Basketball and American football and ice hockey and well, most modern sports, the actual play time is not much longer either because there is very little time out or overtime as in if the play stops, the clock just keeps on ticking. Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Judith: First word [Weiter]
Chuck: Further.
Judith: [Weiter, weiter] Next [Ruhe]
Chuck: Silence, tranquility or calm.
Judith: [Ruhe, Ruhe] This word is feminine. Next [Traurig]
Chuck: Sad.
Judith: [Traurig, traurig] Next [Mann]
Chuck: Man.
Judith: [Mann, Mann] This word is masculine and the plural is [Männer]. Next [Wenn]
Chuck: When or if.
Judith: Wenn, wenn. This is not used for sentences in the past tense. Next [Sitzen]
Chuck: To sit.
Judith: [Sitzen, sitzen] Next [Allein]
Chuck: Alone.
Judith: [Allein, allein] Next [Angucken]
Chuck: To look at.
Judith: [Angucken, angucken] The [An] splits off as usual. Next [Verkaufen]
Chuck: To sell.
Judith: [Verkaufen, verkaufen] Next [Nehmen]
Chuck: To take.
Judith: [Nehmen, nehmen] This is a vowel changing verb except it also drops the age. So the forms for second and third person singular is [Du nimmst] and [Er nimmt] nimmt. Past tense [Er nahm] and perfect tense [Er hat genommen]. Last word for today [Sofort]
Chuck: Immediately.
Judith: [Sofort, sofort]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Chuck: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Judith: The first word we look at is [Einfach]
Chuck: Simply or just.
Judith: This can be used in a phrase like [Geh einfach]
Chuck: Just go.
Judith: And also a really useful phrase is [Lass mich in Ruhe]
Chuck: Leave me alone.
Judith: This is a very useful phrase if somebody is annoying you especially if a stranger harasses you on the street. Simply saying [Ruhe] just means be quiet or you might say [Ruhe da]
Chuck: I think it would be useful if you hang out with German kids?
Judith: Yeah or if your neighbors are partying too much late at night. A final point I wanted to make is the way the word [und] was used in this dialogue.
Chuck: Na und
Judith: Yeah [Und] or [Na und] are common ways to urge people to continue on. For example, if they are telling a story. Be aware though that [Na und] used in the wrong tone can mean, so what? [Na und?]

Lesson focus

Chuck: The focus of this lesson is the future tense.
Judith: The future tense in German [Zukunft] is formed using a form of the auxiliary verb [Werden] and infinitive of that verb that you mean to use. [Werden] is conjugated similarly to a vowel changing verb.
Chuck: Could you give me the forms?
Judith: Sure [Ich werde, Du wirst, Er wird, Wir werden, Ihr werdet, Sie werden]
Chuck: Note that all verbs are regular in the future tense and splitting verbs are never split for this. Could you give us some examples of sentences used in the future tense?
Judith: [Nächstes Jahr wird Martin als Austauschschüler in die USA gehen.]
Chuck: Next year, Martin will go to the USA as an exchange student.
Judith: [Wirst du endlich glücklich sein?]
Chuck: Will you finally be happy?
Judith: [Wann werden sie es einsehen?]
Chuck: When will they realize it?
Judith: Note also that in German, the future is often implied. For example, in the sentence [Ich nehme sie sofort.]
Chuck: In English, that would be I will take it immediately. That just about does it for today.

Outro

Judith: Ready to test what you just learned?
Chuck: I bet you are. Make this lesson’s vocabulary stick by using lesson specific flashcards in the learning center.
Judith: There is a reason everyone uses flashcards.
Chuck: Oh yeah they work.
Judith: They really do help memorization.
Chuck: You can get the flashcards for this lesson at
Judith: Germanpod101.com
Chuck: Okay see you next week.
Judith: [Bis nächste Woche.]

33 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

GermanPod101.com Verified
Monday at 03:24 AM
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How do you like soccer? How often do you watch it?

GermanPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 01:40 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Rafael,


Thank you for a good question.👍


A lot of German students think so, but no, you can't use

that word in this way. The way it is used in the lesson is correct. 😉


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com

Rafael
Monday at 02:45 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello, it shouldn't be Mein Scheißer Chef...?

GermanPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 09:20 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Mahnaz,


You're right. This takes some time getting used to

in the German language.

"sich angucken" or "sich ansehen" - to watch - is a reflexive verb and

"sich" is what is referred to as a "reflexive pronoun".


I hope I was able to clear things up.😉


Thank you.


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com

Mahnaz
Sunday at 06:33 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi,


I can not underestand the role of "sich" in "Meine Frau wird sich das Spiel allein angucken.".

could you please help me with it?

GermanPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 08:45 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Jenna,


Thank you for your feedback!👍


Having spent a lot of time outside of Germany I would agree

with you nowadays and I will raise this issue with our team.

However, the word in question is (unfortunately) quite commonly

used in Germany, certainly in casual conversations, and it might therefore

be worth including it in at least one lesson.


Please accept our apologies if you did feel offended.😞


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com

Jenna
Thursday at 06:47 AM
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This isn't kid-friendly. The lesson transcript uses curse words.

robert groulx
Wednesday at 10:22 AM
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thank you for the dialogue & vocabulary list


robert

GermanPod101.com
Thursday at 07:44 AM
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Hi Vladimir,


I think you already answered your own question😉:


It's "die Karte" there and therefore "sie". It is a bit confusing, I admit,

when you come from a language where things are always neuter.


Thank you.


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com


Vladimir
Wednesday at 08:22 PM
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Hello! I only have one question. Why is it "Ich nehme sie sofort! " and not "Ich nehme es sofort! (die Karte)"? Thank you!


PS Ich hasse Fußball.


GermanPod101.com
Thursday at 06:40 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Elizabeth,


You have come to the right place if you like soccer.😄

Please allow me to make a tiny little change to your sentence:

Ich mag Fußball, besonders den World Cup, aber ich spiele nicht viel.


Thank you.


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com