Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

Intro

Widar: Hello everyone. Welcome back to Basic Bootcamp. I'm Widar.
Rebecca: Hallo. Ich bin Rebecca.
Widar: This is Basic Bootcamp #5. The Bootcamp series is designed to help you ease your way into German.
Rebecca: We'll go over all the basics that will really help you understand German numbers in a quick and easy way!
Widar: In this lesson, we'll continue on with more of the essentials of German numbers. In this lesson, we will venture into higher number territory…the over one hundreds to the ten thousands.
Rebecca: Exciting! But that's a lot of numbers.
Widar: Yes. Obviously, we're not going to read through numbers one hundred to ten thousand.
Rebecca: Well, that might take too long…
Widar: Yeah. What we decided to do is, we'll give you a little sampling of numbers from one hundred to ten thousand, and then we'll go to the structure of how to make these numbers in German.
Rebecca: First, we'll listen to the numbers. So, what can you tell me about today's dialogue?
Widar: We will listen to two people at an auction. Imagine this dialogue to take place in any bigger city of Germany, probably Hamburg or Berlin…
Rebecca: And they'll be fighting over an item, trying to offer the best price.
Widar: Yes, yes…
Dialogue
Auktionär: And here we have a beautiful new motorcycle! Look stylish as you ride around town! We'll start the bidding at 100 euros.
Michael: Einhundert!
Paul: Zweihundert!
Michael: Fünfhundert!
Paul: Eintausend!
Michael: Eintausenddreihundert!
Paul: Eintausendsechshundert!
Michael: Zweitausend!
Paul: Dreitausend!
Michael: Achttausend!!!
Paul: ….
Auctioneer: Sold! To this person right here for eight thousand euros!
Michael: Wahnsinn!
Widar: Noch einmal was langsamer.
Rebecca: One more time, a little slower.
Auktionär: And here we have a beautiful new motorcycle! Look stylish as you ride around town! We'll start the bidding at 100 euros.
Michael: Einhundert!
Paul: Zweihundert!
Michael: Fünfhundert!
Paul: Eintausend!
Michael: Eintausenddreihundert!
Paul: Eintausendsechshundert!
Michael: Zweitausend!
Paul: Dreitausend!
Michael: Achttausend!!!
Paul: ….
Auctioneer: Sold! To this person right here for eight thousand euros!
Michael: Wahnsinn!
Widar: Noch einmal mit Englisch.
Rebecca: One more time, with English.
Rebecca: And here we have a beautiful new motorcycle! Look stylish as you ride around town! We'll start the bidding at 100 euros.
Michael: Einhundert!
Rebecca: One hundred!
Paul: Zweihundert!
Rebecca: Two hundred!
Michael: Fünfhundert!
Rebecca: Five hundred!
Paul: Eintausend!
Rebecca: One thousand!
Michael: Eintausenddreihundert!
Rebecca: One thousand three hundred!
Paul: Eintausendsechshundert!
Rebecca: One thousand six hundred!
Michael: Zweitausend!
Rebecca: Two thousand!
Paul: Dreitausend!
Rebecca: Three thousand!
Michael: Achttausend!!!
Rebecca: Eight thousand!!!
Paul: ….
Rebecca: ….
Auctioneer: Sold! To this person right here for eight thousand euros!
Rebecca: Sold! To this person right here for eight thousand euros!
Michael: Wahnsinn!
Rebecca: Amazing!
Post Conversation Banter
Rebecca: So poor Paul walked away with nothing…but Michael walked away with a brand new motorcycle! How much did he pay for it?
Widar: "Achttausend Euro." ("8,000 euros!")
Rebecca: Hmm, sounds like a lot for a motorcycle. It must have been a pretty nice one! Or maybe he just reeeally wanted it.
Widar: Yeah, he sounded really excited! He said "Wahnsinn!" which literally means "Insane!" but you can use this phrase if you're happy about something that happened. Therefore, we can translate it as "yay" or "I did it!"
Rebecca: Okay, so they were shouting out a lot of big numbers in this conversation. Let's take a closer look at how to put them together.
Vocabulary and Phrase Usage
Rebecca: In the last bootcamp lesson about numbers, we learned numbers one to twenty and introduced the pattern from twenty-one up to one hundred. And that pattern is very easy; number + "and" + multiple of 10. To say "twenty-one," you say "ein-und-zwanzig," which literally is "one-and-twenty."
Widar: And then at the end, we learned that one hundred in German is "einhundert" ("one hundred").
Rebecca: So how do we start forming numbers over one hundred?
Widar: It's very simple, actually. We just take "ein-hundert" ("one hundred") and then put the number after it.
Widar: For example, one hundred one is "einhundert-eins."
Rebecca: Let's break it down.
Widar: "Ein-hundert" ("one hundred") plus "eins" ("one"). "Einhundert-eins."
Rebecca: How about "one hundred eleven"? "One hundred" is "einhundert," and what's "eleven" again?
Widar: "Elf." So, "one hundred eleven" is "einhundert-elf."
Rebecca: Okay, first, why don't we go through multiple hundreds? Like two hundred, three hundred, four hundred, and so on?
Widar: Well, remember that in the last lesson we told you it's fine to leave out the "one" in "one hundred" and simply say "hundert" ("hundred"). To create multiple hundreds, we attach the number in front of "hundert" ("hundred"). This follows the same principle as in English.
Rebecca: So, "one hundred" is "einhundert." What's "two hundred"?
Widar: "Zwei-hundert." Literally, "two hundred."
Rebecca: Okay, how about "three hundred?"
Widar: "Drei-hundert."
Rebecca: "Four hundred" and "five hundred" are?
Widar: "Vier-hundert." "Fünf-hundert."
Rebecca: So, there are no exceptions so far. It's always "number + hundred." How about six hundred?
Widar: "Sechs-hundert."
Rebecca: Okay, "seven hundred" stays the same, right?
Widar: Yes, "sieben-hundert."
Rebecca: How about "eight hundred?"
Widar: "Acht-hundert."
Rebecca: And "nine hundred?"
Widar: "Neun-hundert."
Rebecca: It stays the same as well. That takes care of the hundreds. Are you keeping up okay so far?
Widar: Can we hear the hundreds again? "Noch einmal bitte."
Rebecca and Rebecca: "100" ("one hundred"), "200" ("two hundred"), "300" ("three hundred"), "400" ("four hundred"), "500" ("five hundred"), "600" ("six hundred"), "700" ("seven hundred"), "800" ("eight hundred"), "900" ("nine hundred").
Rebecca: Let's move onto the thousands now. How do we say "one thousand?"
Widar: "Eintausend." And here we have the same situation as with "einhundert" ("one hundred") and "hundert" ("hundred"). You don't need to say the word for "one" as in "one thousand." So instead of "eintausend," you can simply say "tausend" ("thousand").
Rebecca: Now, let's talk about multiple thousands. Let's go through each one one-by-one. What's two thousand…?
Widar: "Zwei-tausend." ("two thousand")
Rebecca: "Three thousand?"
Widar: "Drei-tausend."
Rebecca: "Four" and "five thousand?"
Widar: "Vier-tausend." "Fünf-tausend."
Rebecca: "Six thousand?"
Widar: "Sechs-tausend."
Rebecca: Okay, "seven thousand?"
Widar: "Sieben-tausend."
Rebecca: "Eight thousand?"
Widar: "Acht-tausend."
Rebecca: All right, and "nine thousand?"
Widar: "Neun-tausend."
Rebecca: Great! So, to create multiples of thousand, we use the exact same method that we used to create hundreds. We attach the number in front of "tausend" ("thousand"). Can we hear them one more time? "Langsam bitte." ("Slowly, please.")
Widar: (slowly) "Eintausend, zweitausend, dreitausend, viertausend, fünftausend, sechstausend, siebentausend, achttausend, neuntausend."
Rebecca: Great! Now, before we go, let's introduce a complex number so we can see how to put it all together. Up until now, we've been using clean numbers with lots of zeros. Let's just pick a random big number. Hmm…how about…"two thousand four hundred ninety-six." So we start out with "two thousand"…
Widar: "Zwei-tausend."
Rebecca: "Four hundred."
Widar: "Vier-hundert."
Rebecca: "Ninety-six."
Widar: "Sechs-und-neunzig." Remember that when we build numbers twenty-one to ninety-nine, we say the number first, then say "und" ("and"), and attach the multiple of ten. "Sechs-und-neunzig" ("six-and-ninety").
Rebecca: Put it all together, and you have…
Widar: "Zwei-tausend vier-hundert sechs-und-neunzig."
Rebecca: "Two thousand four hundred ninety-six." Well, it looks like you're ready to count your way all the way up to ten thousand!
Widar: Just keep in mind how to count from one to twenty, then the pattern for twenty-one to ninety-nine, and then the simple rules for counting hundreds and thousands.
Rebecca: Now, we DID say that we'd go up to ten thousand, so let's talk about that number for a moment. This is important!
Widar: Yes, and it's really simple. This goes with English, where you can just say "ten thousand." You don't need to learn a separate word for "ten thousand."
Rebecca: So, the word for "ten thousand" is "zehn-tausend."
Widar: Yes. "Zehn-tausend."
Rebecca: "Zehn-tausend" means "ten thousand." That's easy!
Widar: Right.
Rebecca: Okay, so let's go over the keywords from this lesson. First, what's "one hundred" again?
Widar: "Einhundert"
Rebecca: "One thousand?"
Widar: "Eintausend"
Rebecca: And "ten thousand?"
Widar: "Zehntausend"
Rebecca: There you have it! Again, keep practicing these numbers, and you'll get really good at them!
Widar: Practice makes perfect.

Outro

Widar: Before we go, we want to tell you about a way to improve your pronunciation drastically.
Rebecca: The voice recording tool...
Widar: Yes, the voice recording tool in the premium learning center.
Rebecca: Record your voice with a click of a button,
Widar: and then play it back just as easily.
Rebecca: So you record your voice, and then listen to it.
Widar: Compare it to the native speakers...
Rebecca: And adjust your pronunciation!
Widar: This will help you improve your pronunciation fast!
Rebecca: We hope you enjoyed our second installment on numbers! Join us next time for another Bootcamp lesson!
Widar: Thanks for listening. Bye!
Rebecca: "Bis bald." ("See you!")

13 Comments

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GermanPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Has anyone ever handled a 500 Euro banknote? With the current exchange rate it's about 635 USD or 417 Pounds.

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GermanPod101.com
Wednesday at 9:24 am
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Hi Elizabeth,


Neunzehnhundertneunundachtzig.

That's a mouthful, right?😄


Thank you.


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com


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Elizabeth
Tuesday at 1:14 am
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In Deutsch, how would you say the date? Is it like English?


1989:

neunzehn neun und achtzig

oder

ein tausend neun und achtzig

?

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GermanPod101.com
Thursday at 1:53 pm
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Hello Jason,


That is great to know! We are happy you enjoy learning with us. :smile::smile::smile:


Keep up the good work!

Erica

Team GermanPod101.com

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Jason
Monday at 8:38 pm
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I made it through Basic Bootcamp! I am really enjoying the lessons here. Moving on to the Absolute Beginner lessons. Wish me luck

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GermanPod101.com
Thursday at 12:30 pm
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Hi lud,


Thank you for posting!

We appreciate your feedback, and will be consider for our future lessons and material.


Regards,

Laura

Team GermanPod101.com

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lud
Saturday at 7:44 am
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sorry to tell but review questions are pretty lame ..I mean overall as a learner I feel the need to earn my 100%. Please try and make them tougher

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GermanPod101.com
Monday at 8:33 am
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Hi Richard,


We would call the Übung "von einhundert bis zehntausend zählen lernen"

I hope this helps!


Team GermanPod101.com

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Richard
Sunday at 7:21 am
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Hallo!

Kann man diese Übung "einhundert zu zehntausend rechnen lernen" nennen?


Not quiet sure how to say "call/to call" in German, hope the sentence was comprehensible

Thanks,

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GermanPod101.com
Saturday at 4:18 am
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Hi Joseph,


Thank you for commenting - I will pass on your suggestion to our contents team.


Katrin

Team GermanPod101.com

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Joseph Spies
Thursday at 12:07 am
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On the Expansion vocabulary, would it be possible to have a slower recording along with a normal speed. Thanks!