Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Frank: Hello, everyone. I’m Frank
Gina: And I’m Gina. Welcome back to GermanPod101.com. This is Absolute Beginner, Season 3, Lesson 21, Getting the Check at a German Restaurant. In this lesson, you’ll learn how to form larger numbers in German.
Frank: This conversation takes place at a pub in Berlin.
Gina: The conversation is between Kate, Jens and the waitress.
Frank: Kate and Jens are friends, so they’ll be using informal German. All exchanges with the waitress will be using formal German, as she is a stranger.
DIALOGUE
Kate: Es is' spät, ich sollte wirklich geh'n.
Jens: Jetz' schon?
Kate: Ja. Ich fühl' mich auch nich' so gut.
Jens: Okay, das versteh' ich.
Jens: Entschuldigung, die Rechnung bitte!
Kellnerin: Zusammen oder getrennt?
Kate: Getrennt bitte!
Kellnerin: Bitte sehr, die Rechnung. Das macht 10 Euro 60.
Kate: Ich hatte eine Cola für 2 Euro 50 und ein Berliner Pilsner für 2 Euro 70, das sind also 5 Euro 20. Hier sind sechs Euro; stimmt so.
Jens: Ich hatte zwei Berliner Pilsner, also insgesamt 5 Euro 40. Ich hab' nur zehn Euro; macht 6.
Kellnerin: Und vier zurück. Danke! Auf Wiedersehen!
Gina: Let's hear the conversation one time slowly.
Kate: Es is' spät, ich sollte wirklich geh'n.
Jens: Jetz' schon?
Kate: Ja. Ich fühl' mich auch nich' so gut.
Jens: Okay, das versteh' ich.
Jens: Entschuldigung, die Rechnung bitte!
Kellnerin: Zusammen oder getrennt?
Kate: Getrennt bitte!
Kellnerin: Bitte sehr, die Rechnung. Das macht 10 Euro 60.
Kate: Ich hatte eine Cola für 2 Euro 50 und ein Berliner Pilsner für 2 Euro 70, das sind also 5 Euro 20. Hier sind sechs Euro; stimmt so.
Jens: Ich hatte zwei Berliner Pilsner, also insgesamt 5 Euro 40. Ich hab' nur zehn Euro; macht 6.
Kellnerin: Und vier zurück. Danke! Auf Wiedersehen!
Gina: Now, let's hear it with English translation.
Kate: Es is' spät, ich sollte wirklich geh'n.
Gina: It's late. I should really get going.
Jens: Jetz' schon?
Gina: Already?
Kate: Ja. Ich fühl' mich auch nich' so gut.
Gina: Yes, I also don't feel so good.
Jens: Okay, das versteh' ich.
Gina: Okay, I understand.
Jens: Entschuldigung, die Rechnung bitte!
Gina: Excuse me, the bill please!
Kellnerin: Zusammen oder getrennt?
Gina: Together or separate?
Kate: Getrennt bitte!
Gina: Separate, please!
Kellnerin: Bitte sehr, die Rechnung. Das macht 10 Euro 60.
Gina: Here you are-the bill. That's €10.60.
Kate: Ich hatte eine Cola für 2 Euro 50 und ein Berliner Pilsner für 2 Euro 70, das sind also 5 Euro 20. Hier sind sechs Euro; stimmt so.
Gina: I had a Cola for €2.50 and a Berliner Pilsner for €2.70, so that's €5.20. Here's 6 euros; keep the change.
Jens: Ich hatte zwei Berliner Pilsner, also insgesamt 5 Euro 40. Ich hab' nur zehn Euro; macht 6.
Gina: I had two Berliner Pilsners, so that's €5.40 in total. I only have 10 euros; I'll pay 6 out of the 10.
Kellnerin: Und vier zurück. Danke! Auf Wiedersehen!
Gina: And 4 back. Thanks! Goodbye!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Gina: Hmm! So Kate and Jens are getting the bill! Was that a date gone wrong?
Frank: Who knows? So, did you know that Germany has a tipping culture?
Gina: I did! This is optional and is typically done if you’ve had pleasant, or even outstanding service for your meals and drinks.
Frank: However, it’s recommended that you don’t just leave the tip on the table. You should either hand some of your change directly to your waitress, or else you can tell them to keep the change with the phrase Stimmt so!
Gina: Yes, and the typical amount to tip is around 5 to 10 percent. If the total sum is below 10 Euros, it’s common to just round up to the next Euro.
VOCAB LIST
Frank: getrennt [natural native speed]
Gina: separately, separated
Frank: getrennt [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: getrennt [natural native speed]
Frank: stimmen [natural native speed]
Gina: to tune, be right
Frank: stimmen [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: stimmen [natural native speed]
Frank: Rechnung [natural native speed]
Gina: bill, check
Frank: Rechnung [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: Rechnung [natural native speed]
Frank: Teil [natural native speed]
Gina: part
Frank: Teil [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: Teil [natural native speed]
Frank: nur [natural native speed]
Gina: only, just
Frank: nur [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: nur [natural native speed]
Frank: insgesamt [natural native speed]
Gina: in total
Frank: insgesamt [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: insgesamt [natural native speed]
Frank: bezahlen [natural native speed]
Gina: to pay
Frank: bezahlen [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: bezahlen [natural native speed]
Frank: zurück [natural native speed]
Gina: back
Frank: zurück [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: zurück [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Gina: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is:
Frank: getrennt.
Gina: “Going Dutch”, as in paying for your own food and drink, is sometimes done in Germany, and in some ways it's an easier system because everyone just pays for their own stuff.
Frank: That said, rounds of drinks are bought in Germany, especially among friends, so either is an option really.
Gina: That’s right! So, in some areas, the waiters will automatically bring you separate bills. But because of all the tourists, particularly in the summer season, a lot of waiters have now taken to asking how you want to be billed.
Frank: The phrase is always Zusammen oder getrennt?
Gina: Meaning “Together or separate?”.
Frank: An alternative question you may hear is Möchten Sie getrennt bezahlen?
Gina: “Would you like to pay separately?”
Frank: Richtig! That’s right! And if you are paying for the bill together, you can reply zusammen.
Gina: “together”.
Frank: Okay, the next phrase is used in the process of paying, Das macht.
Gina: “That makes”. So, say if the bill was twenty Euros and fifty cents.
Frank: Das macht 20 Euro, fünfzig.
Gina: This is a standard way for the price to be announced in Germany. What's the formula we used for this?
Frank: Das macht, plus a number, then Euro, and another number for the cents. In this case, it's like saying "That makes 20 Euros and fifty cents."
Gina: And there’s an even shorter version of this, isn’t there?
Frank: Ja, you can drop the das to simply say Macht 20 Euro, fünzig.
Gina: So, basically, you’ll hear this phrase when you are told the amount you need to pay! Okay, now back to the tipping…
Frank: When you have given the complete amount you want to pay including a tip, you say Stimmt so.
Gina: The best translation for this is “keep the change”. It’s the standard expression to use when you don’t insist on change. And if you have tipped…
Frank: The staff will be really happy, so you’ll probably hear a Vielen Dank! or Herzlichen Dank!
Gina: Got that, listeners? I think you’re well-prepared for your first or future nights out in Germany’s pubs!
Frank: I think so too!
Gina: Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Gina: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use numbers beyond twelve.
Frank: So, let’s have a quick recap on numbers, listeners!
Gina: Great idea. You’ll probably remember them, listeners, but just in case…
Frank: Eins…
Gina: “one”
Frank: Zwei
Gina: “two”
Frank: Drei
Gina: “three”
Frank: Vier
Gina: “four”
Frank: Fünf
Gina: “five”
Frank: Sechs
Gina: “six”
Frank: Sieben
Gina: “seven”
Frank: Acht
Gina: “eight”
Frank: Neun
Gina: “nine”
Frank: Zehn
Gina: “ten”!
Frank: Elf
Gina: “eleven”
Frank: Zwölf
Gina: “twelve”
Frank: Did you remember these, listeners?
Gina: Now we’re going to venture into some higher numbers. Here’s a tip:
Frank: For the numbers 13 to 19, just say the word for the German number of the second digit, and add zehn at the end.
Gina: So, let’s continue…
Frank: Dreizehn
Gina: “thirteen”
Frank: Vierzehn
Gina: “fourteen”
Frank: Fünfzehn
Gina: “fifteen”
Frank: Sechzehn
Gina: “sixteen”
Frank: Siebzehn
Gina: “seventeen”
Frank: Achtzehn
Gina: “eighteen”
Frank: Neunzehn
Gina: “nineteen”. Wait, there are a couple that didn’t follow the rule. Did you notice them?
Frank: Yeah, we make things a bit easier by saying siebzehn rather than siebenzehn, and sechzehn instead of sechs-zehn.
Gina: I see. What's after these?
Frank: “twenty” is zwanzig, “thirty” is dreißig, and “forty” is vierzig.
Gina: From then on, the remaining numbers will be the first digit base number that you already know, and the ending –”z-i-g”. And remember to use the same shortcut as before for six and seven.
Frank: So we get fünfzig,
Gina: “fifty”
Frank: Sechzig
Gina: “sixty”
Frank: Siebzig
Gina: “seventy”
Frank: Achtzig
Gina: “eighty”
Frank: Neunzig
Gina: “ninety”
Frank: You have to remember the conjunction “and” as well in German, which is und. und is used in the middle for numbers such as einundzwanzig
Gina: “twenty-one”
Frank: zweiundzwanzig,
Gina: “twenty-two”
Frank: dreiundzwanzig
Gina: “twenty-three”. Notice that the ones digit are always mentioned before the tens digit when pronouncing a German number. Actually, if you read Jane Austen, you’ll notice that the old English followed the same number pattern.
Frank: After ninety-nine, which is neunundneunzig, you will need hundert to continue.
Gina: That’s not hard because it’s almost the same with English.
Frank: zweihundert is “two hundred”, and so on.
Gina: And it’s the same for thousands, which in German is...
Frank: tausend
Gina: And with this useful little word, you can describe a lot of numbers,
Frank: ...even fünftausend vierhundert zwei und dreißig, which is 5,432.
Gina: Or... should we say “5000, 400, 2 and 30”?
Frank: That works too.
Gina: Shall we give our listeners a little test Frank?
Frank: Sure, why not!
Gina: Listeners, I’ll give you a number, you can guess what it might be, and then Frank will give you the correct answer.
Frank: Okay - what’s our first one Gina?
Gina: 2,985.
Frank: [pause] Zwei tausend, neun hundert-und fünf und achtzig.
Gina: Did you get it right, listeners?
Frank: How about another one?
Gina: Ok, Ready? 7,308
Frank: [pause] Siebentausend, dreihundert und acht.
Gina: Listeners, did you get it right?
Frank: I think we’ve got time for one more,
Gina: Yes – here’s your last one for this lesson - 1,875
Frank: [pause] Tausend, acht hundert und fünf und siebzig

Outro

Gina: Okay. That’s all for this lesson. Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Frank: Dann, bis zum nächsten Mal!

5 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

GermanPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Hello Listeners, do you want the check together or separate? Try answering in German! 

GermanPod101.com
Friday at 03:57 PM
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Hi Elizabeth,


You are very generous!👍


Thank you.


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com


Elizabeth
Wednesday at 11:33 PM
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Ich möchte gerne zusammen bezahlen, bitte. 😁

Germanpod101.com Verified
Thursday at 02:23 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Ramirez,


Thanks for the comment. Your sentence is correct! But there is also another way to say it: "Ich möchte gerne getrennt bezahlen, bitte!" If you add "gerne" it sounds a bit more polite!


Best

Jennifer

Team Germanpod101.com

Francisco Ramirez
Sunday at 05:59 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Ich möchte getrennt bezahlen, bitte.