Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Gina: Hi everyone, and welcome back to GermanPod101.com. This is Absolute Beginner, Season 3, Lesson 19 - This is Bread Worth Moving To Germany For! I’m Gina.
Frank: Hallo! Ich bin Frank and thanks again for being here with us for this lesson.
Gina: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to talk about your likes and dislikes, and word order in subclauses.
Frank: This conversation takes place at a German pub.
Gina: It’s between Kate and Jens.
Frank: The speakers are classmates at a German Language school. So they’ll be using informal German.
DIALOGUE
Kate: Wie findest du Deutschland, Jens?
Jens: Es ist nicht schlecht. Es gibt viele alte Gebäude und viel Grün. Ich bin noch nicht lange hier, aber ich denke, dass ich eine schöne Zeit in Deutschland verbringen werde. Und du? Wie findest du Deutschland?
Kate: Bitte? Ich wohne ja schon seit zwei Jahren hier.
Jens: Es interessiert mich trotzdem, wie du es findest.
Kate: Es ist etwas kalt hier im Moment, aber ich wohne gerne in Deutschland. Ich mag die Menschen gerne.
Jens: Und das Bier! Ich bin sicher, dass es in Spanien nicht so gutes Bier gibt.
Kate: Warum?
Jens: Ähm… die Menschen in Spanien mögen Wein lieber, oder?
Kate: Vielleicht. Meine Eltern trinken viel Wein, aber meine Freunde und ich nicht. Wir mögen Bier lieber.
Gina: Let's hear the conversation one time slowly.
Kate: Wie findest du Deutschland, Jens?
Jens: Es ist nicht schlecht. Es gibt viele alte Gebäude und viel Grün. Ich bin noch nicht lange hier, aber ich denke, dass ich eine schöne Zeit in Deutschland verbringen werde. Und du? Wie findest du Deutschland?
Kate: Bitte? Ich wohne ja schon seit zwei Jahren hier.
Jens: Es interessiert mich trotzdem, wie du es findest.
Kate: Es ist etwas kalt hier im Moment, aber ich wohne gerne in Deutschland. Ich mag die Menschen gerne.
Jens: Und das Bier! Ich bin sicher, dass es in Spanien nicht so gutes Bier gibt.
Kate: Warum?
Jens: Ähm… die Menschen in Spanien mögen Wein lieber, oder?
Kate: Vielleicht. Meine Eltern trinken viel Wein, aber meine Freunde und ich nicht. Wir mögen Bier lieber.
Gina: Now, let's hear it with English translation.
Kate: Wie findest du Deutschland, Jens?
Gina: How are you finding Germany, Jens?
Jens: Es ist nicht schlecht. Es gibt viele alte Gebäude und viel Grün. Ich bin noch nicht lange hier, aber ich denke, dass ich eine schöne Zeit in Deutschland verbringen werde. Und du? Wie findest du Deutschland?
Gina: It’s not bad. There are many old buildings and a lot of green. I haven’t been here long, but I think that I’ll have a pleasant time in Germany. And you? How are you finding Germany?
Kate: Bitte? Ich wohne ja schon seit zwei Jahren hier.
Gina: Sorry? I’ve been living here for two years.
Jens: Es interessiert mich trotzdem, wie du es findest.
Gina: Nevertheless, I’m interested in how you find it.
Kate: Es ist etwas kalt hier im Moment, aber ich wohne gerne in Deutschland. Ich mag die Menschen gerne.
Gina: It’s quite cold here at the moment, but I enjoy living in Germany. I like the people.
Jens: Und das Bier! Ich bin sicher, dass es in Spanien nicht so gutes Bier gibt.
Gina: And the beer! I’m sure that in Spain the beer isn’t as good.
Kate: Warum?
Gina: Why?
Jens: Ähm… die Menschen in Spanien mögen Wein lieber, oder?
Gina: Erm…the people in Spain prefer wine, don’t they?
Kate: Vielleicht. Meine Eltern trinken viel Wein, aber meine Freunde und ich nicht. Wir mögen Bier lieber.
Gina: Perhaps. My parents drink a lot of wine, but my friends and I don’t. We prefer beer.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Gina: So Kate and Jens were talking about what they like about Germany.
Frank: Yes, Germany is a wonderful place and it’s very popular for its natural environment.
Gina: That’s very true! Hamburg, for example, is a very green city with a lot of parks and open spaces.
Frank: Yes, even the cities boast some wonderful parks and gardens. And Germany has some beautiful landscapes and forests too.
Gina: So Frank, can you give our listeners some other reasons why Germany is a great place to live?
Frank: Well, the standard of living is pretty high.
Gina: And the food is pretty good too.
Frank: Yeah! Glorious dark whole grain rye bread that doesn’t budge if you try to squeeze it. More than a few expats have moved back to Germany because of it!
Gina: And German rye bread is pretty healthy too!
Frank: We haven’t even mentioned the cakes and sausages either.
Gina: I’m getting hungry.
Frank: Okay, so before we get too hungrig….
VOCAB LIST
Frank: Mensch [natural native speed]
Gina : human
Frank: Mensch [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: Mensch [natural native speed]
Frank: grün [natural native speed]
Gina: green
Frank: grün [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: grün [natural native speed]
Frank: interessieren (für) [natural native speed]
Gina: to interest, to intrigue
Frank: interessieren (für) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: interessieren (für) [natural native speed]
Frank: denken [natural native speed]
Gina : to think
Frank: denken [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: denken [natural native speed]
Frank: finden [natural native speed]
Gina: to find
Frank: finden [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: finden [natural native speed]
Frank: alt [natural native speed]
Gina: old
Frank: alt [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: alt [natural native speed]
Frank: lang [natural native speed]
Gina: long, a long time
Frank: lang [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: lang [natural native speed]
Frank: alt [natural native speed]
Gina: old
Frank: alt [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: alt [natural native speed]
Frank: mögen [natural native speed]
Gina: to like
Frank: mögen [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: mögen [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Gina: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word we’ll look at is...
Frank: Bitte?
Gina: It's the equivalent of "sorry?" or "pardon me?" and can also be used as a way to ask for something.
Frank: For example, Einen Orangensaft, bitte.
Gina: “An orange juice, please”. You can also say it if you don’t understand something.
Frank: Since it’s slightly informal, we would advise you to use it together with the word wie, as in the expression wie bitte?
Gina: There’s another word you can use in this case, and it has a very similar tone to “what?” in English.
Frank: Yes, that’s Was? It serves the same purpose but it’s a lot less polite. It can be considered too direct and rude.
Gina: In other contexts, it’s used following the normal question-word rules.
Frank: For example, Was haben Sie gegessen?
Gina: “What did you eat?”
Frank: Richtig. That’s correct! Okay, and the next word is lieber.
Gina: Which means “rather”, “more sweet”, “nice” or “dear” depending on the context.
Frank: There’s the expression lieber mögen which is best translated as “to prefer”, so that would fall under the meaning of “rather”.
Gina: There’s no better way to say “to prefer” in German unless you’re looking for something really stiff.
Frank: And also note that Lieber is the most common way to start an informal letter in German. You can write Lieber Jens or Liebe Kate, but remember that for women the final “R” is dropped.
Gina: This is the same as writing “dear someone” in English.
Frank: And the last word we’ll look at is the term grün.
Gina: It can mean "green" as in the color, and also describe anything that's environmentally-friendly. It’s an important word as Germany is a very green country, not only because of its landscapes and plants in the cities, but also because of its admirable approach to recycling and maintaining.
Frank: Right. Eine grüne Umwelt.
Gina: “A green environment”, yes. Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Gina: In this lesson you’ll learn about word order and sub-clauses.
Frank: Let’s start with the verb mögen.
Gina: Which means “to like”. It’s another irregular German verb, and in this lesson’s dialogue, you encountered several forms of it.
Frank: Such as ich mag, wir mögen and sie mögen. Mögen behaves just like other modal verbs. So like sollen, it doesn’t get the “E” or “T” ending in singular.
Gina: In fact, we’re dealing with two different stems for this verb.
Frank: Everything in the singular is based on mag, while everything in the plural is based on mög.
Gina: What are the complete forms? Shall we go through them, Frank?
Frank: Sure! ich mag.
Gina: “I like”.
Frank: (slow) ich mag
Gina: Okay! Next?
Frank: du magst
Gina: “you like”.
Frank: (slow) du magst
Gina: Next?
Frank: er mag
Gina: “he likes”
Frank: (slow) er mag
Gina: Next?
Frank: Sie mag
Gina: “she likes”
Frank: (slow) Sie mag
Gina: What about the impersonal pronoun, “it”?
Frank: es mag. (slow) es mag.
Gina: “it likes”. Ok, now onto the plural pronouns.
Frank: Wir mögen
Gina: “we like”
Frank: (slow) wir mögen
Gina: And how about “you like” in the plural?
Frank: ihr mögt
Gina: One more time?
Frank: (slow) ihr mögt
Gina: And finally, “they like”?
Frank: sie mögen. (slow) sie mögen.
Gina: Okay! Great!
Frank: mögen is an extremely useful verb when talking about your likes and dislikes.
Gina: So make sure you remember it with all its forms!
Frank: Also, you’ll find that almost all modal verbs do the split between singular and plural forms. So they use a different stem or a different vowel to keep them apart.
Gina: Another thing we want to talk about in this lesson is that the order in German sub-clauses varies. In sub-clauses, all verbs go to the very end of the sentence as if there was already another verb present in the sentence.
Frank: Yeah, for example, ich denke, dass ich eine schöne Zeit in Deutschland haben werde.
Gina: “I think that I will have a nice time in Germany.”
Frank: That’s right! So you can see that the verbs haben and werden, are placed at the end of the sentence.
Gina: Let’s hear the sentence one more time.
Frank: ich denke, dass ich eine schöne Zeit in Deutschland haben werde.

Outro

Gina: Well, that does it for this lesson. Remember to check the lesson notes, and we’ll see you next time. Bye!
Frank: Ja! Bestimmt! Bis zum nächsten Mal!

11 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

GermanPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Hello Listeners! Have you ever tried German bread? Did you like it?

GermanPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 12:34 PM
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Hi George,


Oops!😉

Thank you for pointing this out to us. Well spotted.


I will forward your comment to our team to have

this fixed as soon as possible.

We are very sorry for the inconvenience.


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com

George Townsend
Saturday at 02:04 AM
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They are saying England when it should be Spanien

GermanPod101.com Verified
Friday at 10:28 AM
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Hello Pola philobos,


Thank you for a good question.👍


There is no difference. Both appear in the dictionary

with the same translations.😉


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com

Pola philobos
Saturday at 09:19 AM
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What is the difference between gern and gerne? Thanks

GermanPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 01:21 AM
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Hello Amerikanerin,


Thank you for posting!


"Ich mag... gern." can be heared in spoken language. I think in written language it would be rather uncommon.

In fact, combining the verb "mögen" and the adverb "gern" is kind of redundant, as "mögen" means "to like" and "gern" indicates to like something, aswell.


You could say for example: "Ich mag Spaghetti." or "Ich esse gern Spaghetti." - both would indicate that you like spaghetti.

Combining "mögen" and "gern" might give the sentence more emphasis, but this can also be achieved by saying "Ich mag Spaghetti sehr."


I hope this was helpful. For further questions, don't hesitate to contact us.


Sincerely,

Anne

Team GermanPod101.com

Amerikanerin
Monday at 05:24 PM
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Can one say, "Ich mag etwas gern"? - I thought it was, "Ich mag etwas sehr," - is it a mistake (like the Spain/England) or does "gern" fit equally well with Präsens Indicativ as with Konjuktiv II?

GermanPod101.com Verified
Monday at 03:46 AM
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Hi Shorj,


Sorry the "bigger than" and "smaller than" signs are not progressed correctly by our commenting programme. I never experience any issue with them, though. Strange.


Regards,

Katrin

Team GermanPod101.com

GermanPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 03:45 PM
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Hi shorj,


I am afraid I can't understand the message to web programmer :sob:

If you are experiencing any tech problem, please send us a mail to contactus@GermanPod101.com .


Thank you,

Regards,

Ofelia

Team GermanPod101.com

shorj
Monday at 08:03 PM
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to web programmer: < and > are not handled correctly in comments .}

shorj
Monday at 08:02 PM
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England Spain, oder?