Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Chuck: Chuck here. Absolute Beginner Season 2, Lesson 5, You're Not in Kansas Anymore. This is Germany. Hello and welcome to GermanPod101.com where we study modern German in a fun educational format.
Judith: So brush up on the German that you started learning ago or start learning today.
Chuck: Thanks for being here with us for this lesson, Judith. What are we looking at today?
Judith: In this lesson you will learn where you're from.
Chuck: This conversation takes place at the registration desk of a German Language School.
Judith: The conversation is between Paul and the woman doing the registration.
Chuck: The speakers are in a business relationship therefore they'll be speaking formal German. Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUES
Judith: Sind Sie Engländer?
Chuck: Nein, ich bin Amerikaner.
Judith: Aus welcher Stadt sind Sie?
Chuck: Denver. Das ist in Colorado. Kennen Sie Colorado?
Judith: Colorado... Das ist links neben Kansas, oder?
Chuck: Haha, ja, wir sind links neben Kansas, und rechts von Utah.
Judith: Now slowly.
Judith: Sind Sie Engländer?
Chuck: Nein, ich bin Amerikaner.
Judith: Aus welcher Stadt sind Sie?
Chuck: Denver. Das ist in Colorado. Kennen Sie Colorado?
Judith: Colorado... Das ist links neben Kansas, oder?
Chuck: Haha, ja, wir sind links neben Kansas, und rechts von Utah.
Judith: Now with the translation.
Judith: Sind Sie Engländer?
Chuck: Are you English?
Judith: Nein, ich bin Amerikaner.
Chuck: No, I'm an American.
Judith: Aus welcher Stadt sind Sie?
Chuck: Which city are you from?
Judith: Denver. Das ist in Colorado. Kennen Sie Colorado?
Chuck: Denver that's in Colorado. Are you familiar with Colorado?
Judith: Colorado... Das ist links neben Kansas, oder?
Chuck: Colorado. That's next to Kansas to the left, isn’t it?
Judith: Haha, ja, wir sind links neben Kansas, und rechts von Utah.
Chuck: Yes, we're to the left of Kansas and to the right of Utah.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Judith: All right. So I think today we should cover a really important topic and that is the kind of words that you would encounter on a German form like if you want to stand up to the language school.
Chuck: All right. Sounds good.
Judith: This is actually a more advanced set of vocabulary but the German government has determined that they should be taught in beginner courses anyway because they're just so essential.
Chuck: Yeah, you really can't get any paperwork done without knowing them and we know Germans love paperwork.
Judith: All right. So here are the most common words that you'll need to be able to recognize in forms. One is Titel
Chuck: Title.
Judith: This is if you're like a doctor or professor or a PhD or whatever. There’s also Anrede
Chuck: That'll be the form of address like sir or what else would you have there?
Judith: Well, mostly “Herr” or “Frau”, you know, Mr., Mrs., Ms., anything like that. Then we have Name
Chuck: Name.
Judith: Which could also be split in to Vorname
Chuck: First name or given name.
Judith: And Nachname
Chuck: Last name or family name.
Judith: And then there's Geschlecht
Chuck: Gender.
Judith: Remember this word Geschlecht. Here you would put an M for man or a W for woman because the German words are „männlich“
Chuck: Male.
Judith: And „weiblich“
Chuck: Female.
Judith: Then we have Alter
Chuck: Age.
Judith: And then Nationalität
Chuck: Nationality.
Judith: This one should be easy for you to recognize or sometimes they use the German word Staatsangehörigkeit
Chuck: Citizenship.
Judith: Staatsangehörigkeit , It's a long word. You should look this up. And then we have Stadt
Chuck: City.
Judith: And Land
Chuck: Country.
Judith: Finally they might want to know your Beruf
Chuck: Profession.
Judith: And at the end you should put your Unterschrift
Chuck: Signature.
Judith: “Unterschrift” literally means under writing. Now this is a lot of words. You should look up these words in the lesson notes and familiarize yourself with them especially if you think that you will need to fill out a form in German soon.
VOCAB LIST
Chuck: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is?
Judith: sein
Chuck: To be.
Judith: sein
Chuck: Next.
Judith: Engländer
Chuck: Englishman.
Judith: Engländer
Chuck: Next.
Judith: Amerikaner
Chuck: American.
Judith: Amerikaner
Chuck: Next.
Judith: aus
Chuck: From.
Judith: aus
Chuck: Next.
Judith: welcher
Chuck: Which.
Judith: welcher
Chuck: Next.
Judith: Stadt
Chuck: Town or city.
Judith: Stadt. Stadt, that is feminine.
Chuck: Next.
Judith: in
Chuck: In or into.
Judith: in
Chuck: Next.
Judith: neben
Chuck: Next to.
Judith: neben
Chuck: Next.
Judith: oder
Chuck: Or.
Judith: oder
Chuck: Next.
Judith: von
Chuck: Of or from.
Judith: von
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Chuck: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Judith: The first thing we should look at is that if you're saying „Ich bin Amerikaner“, you’re using the word for the person, you're not using the adjective. The adjective would be „amerikanisch“. By the same token „Engländer“ is the word for a person from England and English is the adjective.
Chuck: If you're Judith, note that you usually have to indicate that in German when you're mentioning your nationality or profession. Fortunately it's enough to add the ending “IN” in the vast majority of cases. Could you give some examples for that?
Judith: Well, in this case you would say „Amerikanerin“ or „Engländerin“

Lesson focus

Chuck: The focus of this lesson is the conjugation of sein part one.
Judith: In this lesson, we've seen a few forms of the verb to be which is irregular in German like in most languages.
Chuck: The infinitive is „sein“ so „sein“ is the equivalent of to be.
Judith: Then we have ich bin
Chuck: I am.
Judith: er ist
Chuck: He is.
Judith: Or you could also say er ist and then of course wir sind
Chuck: We are.
Judith: And Sie sind
Chuck: They are.
Judith: Sie sind can also mean you, formal, are. We'll learn the rest a little later. Each of these podcasts is very short and we don't want to overwhelm you.
Chuck: Well, that just about does it for today. Like our podcast?
Judith: Then like our Facebook page too.
Chuck: Get lesson updates or German word of the day and news on Facebook.
Judith: Just search for GermanPod101 and like our fan page.
Chuck: And if you like a particular lesson or series in GermanPod101.
Judith: Let us know.
Chuck: Click the like button next to the lesson or series. Thanks for listening and see you next week.
Judith: Danke fürs Zuhören und bis nächste Woche!

58 Comments

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GermanPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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GermanPod101.com
Thursday at 8:38 am
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Hi Oli,


"I am American" would translate to something like "Ich bin aus Amerika", referring

to nationality.

"I am an American" on the other hand refers to the person I believe, and in that case

we distinguish between masculine and feminine in the German language.

In case of a male one would say "Ich bin Amerikaner", in case of a female we would say

"Ich bin Amerikanerin".

I hope I was able to help.


Thank you.


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com


user profile picture
Oli
Wednesday at 5:26 am
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Hi there! I was wondering. I got a little bit confused with the ending "in" when you're saying that you're American, could somebody please explain?

user profile picture
GermanPod101.com
Friday at 7:15 am
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Hello Eduardo,


A very good question.


It is very tempting to start the sentence with the

question word "welche", but unfortunately you can't do that.

Why exactly the language developed that way I am not sure,

but the preposition "aus" has to come first in a case like this.


Thank you.


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com


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Eduardo
Wednesday at 11:01 pm
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I have a question in this sentence: Aus welcher Stadt sind Sie?


why the word aus is the first word in the sentence. Is it correct to write like this:


welcher Stadt sind Sie aus?

thank you


user profile picture
GermanPod101.com
Wednesday at 3:45 pm
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Hi Jason,


You read this very carefully, I can tell.

It sounds a bit strange but yes, it is correct.


Thank you.


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com


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Jason
Tuesday at 6:15 am
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Can I confirm the sentence for von in the vocabulary section is correctly translated?


German: Ich kriege von meinen Eltern gesagt, was ich tun und lassen kann.

English: I get told by my parents what I can and can't do.

user profile picture
GermanPod101.com
Saturday at 5:21 pm
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Hi Sandy,


You are a good listener.

"ch" should always be pronounced as that in proper German.

Generally, when it sounds more like "sch", it is usually foreigners

speaking with an accent, like for instance in this story, or in some

German dialects.


Thank you.


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com


user profile picture
GermanPod101.com
Tuesday at 7:21 am
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Hi Über,


Yes indeed, you are. We hope you are having some

fun too, in between all the hard work. 😉


Thank you.


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com


user profile picture
GermanPod101.com
Friday at 7:55 am
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Hallo Sabzine,


Thank you very much! We are happy to hear that.

Best of luck with your future studies.😉


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com


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Über
Saturday at 10:50 am
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Ich bin Deutsch. Nein ich nicht deutch. Look i tried hard