Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Chuck: Chuck here, Absolute Beginner, Season 2, Lesson 19, Bread Worth Moving To Germany For! Hello and welcome to GermanPod101.com, the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn German.
Judith: I’m Judith and thanks again for being here with us for this Absolute Beginner, Season 2 lesson.
Chuck: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to talk about your likes and dislikes.
Judith: This conversation takes place at a German pub.
Chuck: The conversation is between Paul and Sarah.
Judith: The speakers are classmates at a German Language school. Therefore, they will be speaking informal German.
Chuck: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUES
Judith: Wie findest du Deutschland, Paul?
Chuck: Es ist nicht schlecht. Es gibt viele alte Gebäude und viel Grün. Ich bin noch nicht lange hier, aber ich denke, dass ich eine schöne Zeit in Deutschland haben werde.
Judith: Und du? Wie findest du Deutschland?
Chuck: Bitte? Ich wohne ja schon seit zwei Jahren hier.
Judith: Es interessiert mich trotzdem, wie du es findest.
Chuck: Es ist etwas kalt hier im Moment, aber ich wohne gerne in Deutschland. Ich mag die Menschen.
Judith: Und das Bier! Ich bin sicher, dass es in Spanien nicht so gutes Bier gibt.
Chuck: Warum?
Judith: Ähm... die Menschen in Spanien mögen Wein lieber, oder?
Chuck: Vielleicht. Meine Eltern trinken viel Wein, aber meine Freunde und ich nicht. Wir mögen Bier lieber.
Judith: Now with the translation.
Judith: Wie findest du Deutschland, Paul?
Chuck: How do you find Germany, Paul?
Judith: Es ist nicht schlecht.
Chuck: It’s not bad.
Judith: Es gibt viele alte Gebäude und viel Grün.
Chuck: There are lots of old buildings and lots of green.
Judith: Ich bin noch nicht lange hier, aber ich denke, dass ich eine schöne Zeit in Deutschland haben werde.
Chuck: I haven’t been here for long, but I think that I’ll have a nice time in Germany.
Judith: Und du? Wie findest du Deutschland?
Chuck: And you, how do you find Germany?
Judith: Bitte? Ich wohne ja schon seit zwei Jahren hier.
Chuck: Excuse me, I’ve lived here for two years already.
Judith: Es interessiert mich trotzdem, wie du es findest.
Chuck: I’m nevertheless interested in what you think of it.
Judith: Es ist etwas kalt hier im Moment, aber ich wohne gerne in Deutschland.
Chuck: It’s somewhat cold here at the moment, but I like living in Germany.
Judith: Ich mag die Menschen.
Chuck: I like the people.
Judith: Und das Bier! Ich bin sicher, dass es in Spanien nicht so gutes Bier gibt.
Chuck: And the beer, I’m sure that there isn’t such good beer in Spain?
Judith: Warum?
Chuck: Why?
Judith: Ähm... die Menschen in Spanien mögen Wein lieber, oder?
Chuck: The people in Spain prefer wine, don’t they?
Judith: Meine Eltern trinken viel Wein, aber meine Freunde und ich nicht.
Chuck: Perhaps. My parents drink lots of wine, but my friends and I don’t.
Judith: Wir mögen Bier lieber.
Chuck: We prefer beer.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Chuck: So I think Paul and Sarah are two foreigners talking about what they like about Germany, but actual Germans may have said pretty much the same.
Judith: Yeah, Germany is unlike a lot of other countries in that patriotism is discouraged. If you hear a German state that they are proud to be German or something along those lines then you have to ask yourself if they might belong to an extreme right-wing group or something.
Chuck: I mean, I’d say the same if you see someone carrying a German flag, well, unless it’s during the soccer world cup season.
Judith: Yeah. This does not necessarily mean that Germans despise their country. After attending history classes, there were a few who turn to self low thing.
Chuck: And they are some who embraced the idea of the European Union within an unnatural fervor.
Judith: Yeah, but the majority of Germans are silently attached to Germany.
Chuck: That’s easy to curse the politicians, the institutions and all. But at the end of the day, Germans will tell you they prefer to live here rather than somewhere else.
Judith: Yeah. In their mind, there is always something wrong with other countries whether that would be more crime, less comprehensive healthcare, worse infrastructure, people who don’t bother to be on time, lack of work ethic, speed limits on roads.
Chuck: Plus there’s the matter of the awesome beer, can’t forget that.
Judith: If you ever want to hear a German claim superiority, just ask about the beer.
Chuck: Strangely enough, the thing that most Germans desperately miss after living abroad for a while isn’t so much the beer as the German bread.
Judith: Yeah, glorious, dark, whole grain rye bread that doesn’t budge if you try to squeeze it. More than a few expats have moved back to Germany because of it.
Chuck: We haven’t even mentioned the cakes and sausages either. I’m getting hungry. So before that.
VOCAB LIST
let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first one we shall look at is...
Judith: finden
Chuck: To find.
Judith: finden
Chuck: Next.
Judith: schlecht
Chuck: Bad.
Judith: schlecht
Chuck: Next.
Judith: alt
Chuck: Old.
Judith: alt
Chuck: Next.
Judith: grün
Chuck: Green.
Judith: grün
Chuck: Next.
Judith: lang
Chuck: Long or a long time.
Judith: lang
Chuck: Next.
Judith: denken
Chuck: To think.
Judith: denken
Chuck: Next.
Judith: dass
Chuck: That.
Judith: dass
Chuck: Next.
Judith: interessieren
Chuck: To interest or intrigue.
Judith: interessieren
Chuck: Next.
Judith: mich
Chuck: Me.
Judith: mich
Chuck: Next.
Judith: kalt
Chuck: Cold.
Judith: kalt
Chuck: Next.
Judith: mögen
Chuck: To like.
Judith: mögen
Chuck: Next.
Judith: Mensch
Chuck: Human.
Judith: Mensch and the plural is Menschen
Chuck: Next.
Judith: warum
Chuck: Why?
Judith: warum
Chuck: Next.
Judith: lieb
Chuck: Dear or cherished.
Judith: lieb
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Chuck: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Judith: The first word we’ll look at is „Bitte?“. This is something that you can say if you didn’t understand. You can also say „Was?“. It serves the same purpose but it’s a lot less polite.
Chuck: Yeah, say if you say „Was?“ you come off as sounding somewhat uneducated or something, right?
Judith: Yeah.
Chuck: Or rude.
Judith: I mean, there are three steps really. „Bitte?“ is a really polite and nice way of saying it and there is „Was?“, which is already a less polite and then there’s “He?” and then, that’s just bad.
Chuck: Nice. “He?”
Judith: Okay. Next word is „lieber“.
Chuck: Literally means “doer”.
Judith: Yeah, but then there’s „lieber mögen“ and that’s an expression best translated as “to prefer”. There’s no better way to say it “to prefer” in German unless you’re looking for something really stiff. So it’s down to „lieber mögen“ And we should also note that „Lieber“ is the most common way to start an informal letter in German. You can write something like „Lieber Paul“ or „Liebe Sarah“ for women, the final R is dropped. This is the same as writing dear so and so in English.

Lesson focus

Chuck: The focus of this lesson is "mögen" and the word order and sub-clauses.
Judith: „mögen“
Chuck: To like.
Judith: Is another irregular German verb. And in this lesson’s dialogue, you have encountered several forms of it such as „ich mag“, „wir mögen“and „sie mögen“.
Chuck: „mögen“ behaves like a modal verb. So like „sollen“, it doesn’t get the E or T ending in singular.
Judith: In fact, we’re dealing with two different stems for this verb. Everything in the singular is based of „mag“ and everything in the plural is based of „mög“.
Chuck: What are the complete forms?
Judith: Well, ich mag, du magst, er mag, wir mögen, ihr mögt, sie mögen.
Chuck: That’s an extremely useful verb when talking about what your likes and dislikes. So learn that well.
Judith: Also you will find that almost all modal verbs do the split between singular and plural forms. So they use a different stem or different vowel to keep them apart.
Chuck: Another great thing I want to introduce today is that the word order in German sub-clauses is messed up. In sub-clauses, all verbs go to the very end of the sentence as if there was already another verb present in the sentence.
Judith: Yeah, that’s why there’s dialogue contain sentences like „ich denke, dass ich eine schöne Zeit in Deutschland haben werde“.
Chuck: Literally, that means, I think that “I a nice time in Germany have will” or for the poor non-Germans among us, I think that they’ll have a nice time in Germany.
Judith: „ich denke, dass ich eine schöne Zeit in Deutschland haben werde“.

Outro

Chuck: Well, that’s just about for today, does it? Oh, wait, that just for about today, it does.
Judith: No, because it’s not the sub-clause.
Chuck: Okay. I guess, that’s just about does it for today then.
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Chuck: Or skip around the different levels, it’s all up to you.
Judith: Instantly access them all right now at GermanPod101.com.
Chuck:So, see you next week!
Judith:Also, bis nächste Woche!

9 Comments

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GermanPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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GermanPod101.com
Tuesday at 9:03 am
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Hi Jen,


You are right. The accent is strong, but as is explained during the introduction,

both them are students of the German language and there is hardly anyone

learning a foreign language, who doesn't have at least a slight accent. One may have

to listen a little more carefully, but on the other hand it is kind of cute.


Thank you.


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com


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Jen
Wednesday at 1:50 am
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Hallo:)


Warum ist Chuck's Akzent so komish? Es ist Schwer zu verstehen! Er sagt "ish" vs "ich", etc...?

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GermanPod101.com
Monday at 4:05 am
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Hi Julian,


hmmmm, Schokolade! I love it ;)


Regards,

Katrin

Team GermanPod101.com

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Julian
Monday at 9:31 pm
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Hallo GermanPod101.com,


Ich mag die Schokolade, weil sie Süßware ist und sie gibt uns Kraft(energie).


Viel Grüße,

Julian

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GermanPod101.com
Tuesday at 6:02 am
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Hi Freddy,


Thank you for commenting!


In this sentence, the "mir" is not necessary. Both sentences have the same meaning. Adding the "mir" adds a bit more focus on the fact that I, myself, am not sure yet - but both phrases can be used simultaneously.


I hope this helps!


Katrin

Team GermanPod101.com

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Freddy
Sunday at 5:54 pm
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Hallo.


Warum in letzte dialogue (nummer 18) er sagt: ich bin mir noch nicht sicher,

un hier nur ich bin sicher?


wann braucht "mir" und wann nicht? danke!


just wondering why in lesson number 18 sicher is with mir and here not. When is it necessary mir? Right now my intuition is answering the question, but if you could explain and clarify it would be great. Thank you

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GermanPod101.com
Friday at 3:49 pm
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Hi Franck,


Thanks for the comment. The English sentences on the audio transcription session is for giving the translation in text. In the session, we only offer the German audio for the line by line.


If you have any questions, please let us know.


Thank you,


Jae

Team GermanPod101.com

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Franck
Friday at 4:04 pm
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17/08/12

In the audio transcript section the audio for the English dialog is the German one!