Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Chuck: Chuck here. Absolute Beginner Season 2, Lesson 15; Who are you Making Plans with in German? Hello and welcome to GermanPod101.com, where we study modern German in a fun educational format.
Judith: So brush up on the German that you started learning long ago or start learning today.
Chuck: Thanks for being here with us for this lesson, Judith. What are we looking at today?
Judith: In this lesson, you will learn how to talk about your plans for the day. This conversation takes place at school, after classes.
Chuck: The conversation is between Sarah and Paul, two students.
Judith: The speakers are classmates. Therefore, they’ll be speaking informal German.
Chuck: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUES
Judith: So, Paul, was machst du jetzt?
Chuck: Ich fahre nach Hause und esse etwas. Ich habe Hunger.
Judith: Ich auch. Hast du heute Abend schon etwas vor?
Chuck: Wir haben noch keine neuen Vokabeln, also werde ich vielleicht etwas Grammatik lernen.
Judith: Bah! Grammatik lernen wir in der Schule. Ich werde heute Abend ausgehen. Kommst du mit?
Chuck: Wohin wirst du gehen?
Judith: Ein Freund von mir, Simon, wird heute im „International Pub“ Jazz spielen. Danach werden wir zusammen etwas trinken.
Chuck: Klingt gut. Ich komme mit.
Judith: Now, slowly.
Judith: So, Paul, was machst du jetzt?
Chuck: Ich fahre nach Hause und esse etwas. Ich habe Hunger.
Judith: Ich auch. Hast du heute Abend schon etwas vor?
Chuck: Wir haben noch keine neuen Vokabeln, also werde ich vielleicht etwas Grammatik lernen.
Judith: Bah! Grammatik lernen wir in der Schule. Ich werde heute Abend ausgehen. Kommst du mit?
Chuck: Wohin wirst du gehen?
Judith: Ein Freund von mir, Simon, wird heute im „International Pub“ Jazz spielen. Danach werden wir zusammen etwas trinken.
Chuck: Klingt gut. Ich komme mit.
Judith: Now with the translation.
Judith: So, Paul, was machst du jetzt?
Chuck: So Paul, what are you doing now?
Judith: Ich fahre nach Hause und esse etwas. Ich habe Hunger.
Chuck: I’m going home and eating something. I’m hungry.
Judith: Ich auch. Hast du heute Abend schon etwas vor?
Chuck: Me too. Do you have something planned this evening?
Judith: Wir haben noch keine neuen Vokabeln, also werde ich vielleicht etwas Grammatik lernen.
Chuck: We don’t have any new vocabulary so maybe I’ll study some grammar.
Judith: Bah! Grammatik lernen wir in der Schule.
Chuck: We study grammar in school.
Judith: Ich werde heute Abend ausgehen. Kommst du mit?
Chuck: I’m going out tonight. Are you coming along?
Judith: Wohin wirst du gehen?
Chuck: Where will you go?
Judith: Ein Freund von mir, Simon, wird heute im „International Pub“ Jazz spielen.
Chuck: My friend Simone will play jazz today in the international pub.
Judith: Danach werden wir zusammen etwas trinken.
Chuck: After that, we’ll drink something together.
Judith: Klingt gut. Ich komme mit.
Chuck: Sounds good. I’m coming along.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Judith: All right. What exactly is going out in Germany? One thing I can tell you is that because of the climate, Germans are a lot less likely to go outside than people in Latin countries. This is just a historic development.
Chuck: People may sit outside in cafes or restaurants in the afternoons in summer but not so much in the evenings.
Judith: Yeah. Also if you walk around Berlin, if you see people outside in the cafes and restaurants in the evenings, it’s usually tourists. Most appointments are still foregoing inside. For example, to go to some of this place, to go to a club, to go to the movies.
Chuck: And appoints have to have a purpose. There’s very few times you just go out to see what’s happening. And also note that you pretty much always have to go out at least one or two days in advance, maybe even further because Germans aren’t typically the kind of people where you say, “Hey, you want to go out tonight?” It’s like, “Oh, I already have plans.”
Judith: Yeah. That’s very likely.
VOCAB LIST
Chuck: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is.
Judith: machen
Chuck: To make or to do.
Judith: machen
Chuck: Next.
Judith: jetzt
Chuck: Now.
Judith: jetzt
Chuck: Next.
Judith: fahren
Chuck: To drive or go. And this is a vowel-changing verb so it is er fährt
Judith: fahren
Chuck: Next.
Judith: Haus
Chuck: House.
Judith: Haus and the plural is Häuser
Chuck: Next.
Judith: Hunger
Chuck: Hunger.
Judith: Hunger
Chuck: Next.
Judith: vorhaben
Chuck: To plan, to have in mind or to intend.
Judith: vorhaben and this is a splitting verb so it’s er hat vor.
Chuck: Next.
Judith: heute
Chuck: Today.
Judith: heute
Chuck: Next.
Judith: wohin
Chuck: Where to?
Judith: wohin
Chuck: Next.
Judith: Freund
Chuck: male friend.
Judith: Freund and the plural is Freunde
Chuck: Next.
Judith: spielen
Chuck: To play.
Judith: spielen
Chuck: Next.
Judith: danach
Chuck: Afterwards.
Judith: danach
Chuck: Next.
Judith: klingen
Chuck: To sound.
Judith: klingen
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Chuck:Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Judith:The first word/phrase we’ll look at is....
Chuck: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Judith: The first phrase we’ll look at is „nach Hause“.
Chuck: Going home.
Judith: It’s a sad expression. It’s a combination of „nach“.
Chuck: To
Judith: And „Haus“.
Chuck: House.
Judith: Where house implies your own house, your home. The „Hause“ at the end of e is a relic of old times when certain prepositions required words to add an e. This is no longer done today. So „nach Hause“ has to be considered as sad expression. Then we should look at „mit-“ A lot of separable verbs stored with „mit-“.
Chuck: With.
Judith: This has the same meaning as along in English. For example, „mitkommen“.
Chuck: To come along.
Judith: „mitgehen“
Chuck: To go along.
Judith: „mittrinken“
Chuck: To have a drink along with other people.
Judith: And „mitessen“.
Chuck: To share a meal.
Judith: As you can see, it's more versatile than in English. Finally, the expression „Klingt gut“.
Chuck: Sounds good.
Judith: It’s a different equivalent of sounds good. You can say „klingt gut“ or you can say „das klingt gut“, both work.

Lesson focus

Grammar:The focus of this lesson is the future tense
Chuck: The focus of this lesson is the future tense. The future tense Zukunft is formed using a form of the auxiliary “werden” and the infinitive of the verb that she meant to use. “werden” is conjugated similarly to a vowel-changing verb.
Judith: ich werde
Chuck: I will.
Judith: du wirst
Chuck: You will.
Judith: er wird
Chuck: He will.
Judith: wir werden
Chuck: We will.
Judith: ihr werdet
Chuck: You all will.
Judith: sie werden
Chuck: They will. The future tense is easier than the present tense because all verbs are regular in the future tense and splitting verbs are never split for this.
Judith: However, there is one thing you’ll have to get used to. Whenever there is more than one verb in a sentence, the second verb as has to go to the very end of the sentence after everything else. This is the case here as well.
Chuck: If the phrases, he will only understand that later because he’s that stupid, then Germans will say the equivalent of “he will it” because he is that stupid, only later to understand.
Judith: We’ll work with simple phrases for now though. Germans rarely use such convoluted phrases in everyday speech.
Chuck: Just remember that the verb goes at the end of the sentence.
Judith: And the forms of „werden“ are ich werde, du wirst, er wird, sie wird, es wird, wir werden, ihr werdet, sie werden,
Chuck: Okay. Can you give us some German examples using the future tense.
Judith: Er wird es verstehen
Chuck: He will understand it.
Judith: Was wirst du in Deutschland machen?
Chuck: What will you do in Germany?
Judith: Ich werde viel Bier trinken
Chuck: I will drink a lot of beer.

Outro

Chuck: That’s just about does it for today.
Judith: Listeners, do you ever have any German language or lesson related questions?
Chuck: Maybe you have some feedback for us? Leave us comment or ask a question in lessons page. It’s super simple, go to GermanPod101.com. Click on comments.
Judith: And who you’re coming to name.
Chuck: That’s it.
Judith: Counting is great way to practice writing, and reading in German.
Chuck: It helps you learn faster.
Judith: And helps us get better through your feedback.
Chuck: No excuses.
Judith: Go to GermanPod101.com and comment now.
Chuck:So, see you next week!
Judith:Also, bis nächste Woche!

20 Comments

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GermanPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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GermanPod101.comVerified
Friday at 8:55 am
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Hi Lavictoire,


Thank you for an interesting question.👍


The "will" as used in the English language (auxiliary verb) is different from the

"will" in "Ich will...". This second will is the inflected form

of the verb "wollen" meaning "to want". So, if you hear something like

"Ich will dich lieben und ehren...", it means "I want to love and respect you...",

I guess.


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com




Lavictoire
Tuesday at 8:57 am
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When someone gets married in the ceremony dont they say "Ich will" rather than "Ich werde es tun?" Can you say "Ich Will" at other times?

GermanPod101.com
Thursday at 7:32 am
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Hi Тарык,


Here we go:

Ich werde gleich nach Hause gehen. Da werde ich ein bisschen schlafen. Wenn ich aufwache, mache ich Hausaufgaben und spiele mit meinen Freunden.


Good work!👍


Thank you.


If you have any further questions, please let us know.


Kind regards,

Reinhard

Team GermanPod101.com


Тарык
Thursday at 12:41 pm
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Guten Morgen von Zypern!)


Ich werde gleich zu Hause gehen. Danach werde ich ein bisschen schlafen. Wann ich auswachsen, mache ich Hausaufgaben und spielen meine Freunde mit.

GermanPod101.comVerified
Thursday at 8:20 pm
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Hello Jen,


Thank you for commenting.


The word order depends on the type of sentence and its beginning.


In a general oration the verb is in the second position, e.g. "Ich werde morgen ins Kino gehen."


In a general oration which begins for example with a temporal adverb like "tomorrow", the verb remains in second position and the subject has to follow, e.g. "Morgen werde ich ins Kino gehen."


In a question the verb is in the first position, e.g. "Werde ich den Film mögen?".


I hope this clears your doubts. Just let me know if you have further questions.


Sincerely,


Anne

Team GermanPod101.com

Jen
Thursday at 9:00 am
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Why do you use werde ich vs ich werde?


Thanks!

GermanPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 1:34 am
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Hello Peter,


Thank you very much for your questions :smile::thumbsup:

The difference between a weak verb and a strong verb is as follows:


1. Weak verbs are verbs with no stem-vowel changes in any tense. They take -te endings in Simple Past and Subjunctive II, and -t endings for their past participles. A few examples would be "sagen", "sagte, "(habe) gesagt"; "wandern", "wanderte", "(bin) gewandert"


2. Strong verbs are the verbs that have stem-vowel changes in one or more of the tenses. In the Simple Past, they take the same endings as modal verbs and their past participles end in -en. Some examples are "gehen", "ging", "(bin) gegangen"


To answer your other questions. Usually, German is quite strict about the capitalization of words. For that reason even in commerce and advertising initial caps for words that aren't nouns aren't accepted. The only exception to this rule is when an adjective is part of a species name, a legal, geographic or historical term; an official title, certain holidays, or common expression, for example "der Zweite Weltkrieg (the Second World War)", "der Nahe Osten (the Middle East)".


As for the non-noun German words, I am pretty sure that there aren't words that are spelt the same and have different meanings when they are not capitalized. But we have many nouns that have different meanings depending on the context. I hope this helps! Please let us know if you have more questions.


Sincerely,


Albert

Team GermanPod101.com

Peter Fraser
Monday at 5:45 am
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Hi,


I've got another question, this time about capitalisation in German. Is it okay to capitalise adjectives, verbs, pronouns (other than Sie), prepositions and articles if they are used in business/organisation names and in advertising slogans?


Suppose there's an English company called the "Dough In The Know Organic Bakery" and it has the slogan "We Only Know Natural Dough" displayed in initial caps under its company name, would German allow: "Teig In Dem Wissen Organisch Bäckerei" and the slogan "Wir Wissen Nur Naturteig" in initial caps if this company were instead a German company? In other words, does German commerce and advertising permit initial caps for words that aren't nouns and that don't begin a sentence?


Also, are there non-noun German words that are spelt the same as nouns but have different meanings simply because they aren't capitalised? In English you can capitalise virtually any word and it won't change its meaning, but I'm not sure about German because of the rule that all nouns should be capitalised, with the implication that any non-noun word that doesn't begin a sentence would become a noun if capitalised and therefore, potentially at least, undergo a change in meaning or even become meaningless.


Thanks



Peter :)

Peter Fraser
Monday at 3:15 am
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Hi,


I've got a question: What's the difference between a weak verb and a strong verb in German?


Thanks



Peter :)

GermanPod101.comVerified
Thursday at 1:55 pm
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Hallo Glenn,


Danke für den Kommentar! :smile:


If you have any questions, please let us know!


Vielen Dank!


Clara

Team GermanPod101.com