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Vocabulary Lists The Fall of the Berlin Wall

The Fall of the Berlin Wall

Tag des Mauerfalls
15 Words 13 Comments
historic
historisch (adj)
historic
wall construction
Mauerbau der masc (n)
wall construction
fall of the Berlin wall
Mauerfall der masc (n)
fall of the Berlin wall
communism
Kommunismus der masc (n)
communism
GDR
DDR die fem (n)
GDR
East Berlin
Ost-Berlin
East Berlin
East Side Gallery
East Side Gallery fem
East Side Gallery
Checkpoint Charlie
Checkpoint Charlie
Checkpoint Charlie
Iron Curtain
Eiserner Vorhang
Iron Curtain
break through
durchbrechen (v)
break through
national border
Staatsgrenze die fem (n)
national border
border crossings
Grenzรผbergรคnge der masc (n)
border crossings
wonder
Wunder das neut (n)
wonder
paving stones
Pflastersteine der masc (n)
paving stones
opening
ร–ffnung die fem (n)
opening
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13 Comments
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Wednesday at 10:38 am
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Hello Fraulein Stratton,

Thank you for posting.
We include the nouns on our site in dictionary form. You can find the gender next to the word written as you can see it in this list.
In the audio and video lessons you can find the information in the Lesson Notes PDF.

Thank you for studying with us.
Cheers,
Lena
Team GermanPod101.com

Fraulein Stratton
Tuesday at 10:01 pm
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Here’s a comment, not for the online tools but for the podcast vocab lessons… every noun is masculine, feminine, or neutral so put that in the podcast vocab lessons as well! I’m refreshing my memory on food items and I know it’s das Messer and der Loefel but a beginner won’t let’s help them out guys. The podcast just says the word “Messer” “Loefel” and so on but makes no mention if it’s der die or das that goes with it.

Friday at 4:06 pm
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Hi Mark,

Thanks for your comment.

You are right, 11/9 has some historical events, positive on the one hand is the fall of the Berlin Wall on the on the other hand, two negative events happened on this day as well: the”(Reichs-)kristallnacht” or Progromnacht (1938) and 1923 the so called “Hitler-Ludendorff-Putsch”. So as you can see, the 9.11. shouldnยดt be a holiday as Germans donยดt want to celebrate days which are related to the National Socialism.
Even though the 11/9 is no official holiday, itยดs celebrated among people in Berlin. Last year (2014) the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Wall was celebrated on the streets as well as with shows at the Brandenburger Tor.

Let me know if you have any other questions!

Thanks,

Jennifer

Team GermaPod101.com

Mark Kurowski
Tuesday at 11:32 am
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The fall of the wall is indeed a momentous event! I’m simply saying that there is NO holiday in Germany on 11/9, and they picked 10/3 to be a day of celebration precisely because of the association of 11/9 with Kristallnacht (they generally call it Pogromnacht). So if during conversations with Germans we German-learners act as if 11/9 is a day that is openly celebrated, we’ll get blank stares in return. I learned that the hard way. ๐Ÿ˜ž

David
Tuesday at 9:29 am
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Ah! You are right! Kristallnacht–”The Night of Broken Glass”. I had not thought about the date for that, and you are right to say the Wall’s demise should not overshadow the importance of what took place so many years earlier. However, I suspect many in Germany are only too happy to not be reminded of that shameful event. Nonetheless, I think almost all Germans want very much to put their sordid past behind them, and are contrite about what occurred.

Still, the fall of the Berlin Wall is, indeed, an event worthy of celebration. There was a tremendous amount of heartbreak that occurred when the Wall came into being. This was especially noticeable in the early days of the Wall, when family members, now separated, could still approach the wall and touch each other across it. Shortly thereafter, a “no man’s land” was created on the eastern side which prevented this. Incredibly, once the Wall fell, the West German government wasted little time putting the two Germany’s back together, at great cost and sacrifice. That’s what German Unity Day is all about. The resilience of Germany is pretty amazing, and we now have a German Chancellor who was raised in “the East”!

So, maybe it isn’t so bad after all that this date has two notable events to memorialize. While they are distinctly different events, they are inexorably linked by the chain of events.

Mark Kurowski
Tuesday at 4:12 am
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You are seriously WRONG about 11/9 being a day of celebration. Yes, the Wall fell, but 11/9 is also the day of very bad things in Nazi Germany (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kristallnacht ).

The real day of celebration is called German Unity Day, which is 10/3 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Unity_Day ).

David
Tuesday at 12:53 am
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I was in Berlin the day the Berlin Wall began. I wish I had been there the day it started coming down!

Monday at 11:41 am
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Hi Jane,

Wow! What an experience!

I am glad we can help you revive your German!

Thank you!

Clara
Team GermanPod101.com

Thursday at 4:48 pm
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Hi David Yarnes!

I’m glad you found it helpful! :thumbsup:
Thank you for posting!

Engla
Team GermanPod101.com

David Yarnes
Sunday at 1:27 pm
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Jane,

Sehr gut! Habe ich alles verstanden. Ich kann Deutsch besser lesen als sprechen oder schreiben! Ich habe nicht ein Deutsche keyboard!

I thought both the S-bahn and the U-bahn had been shut down between the two sectors almost immediately, but I’ve probably forgotten exactly. Anyway, that must have made you a bit nervous!

I was there two years actually–’60 to ‘62. It was a very sad time, particularly for those in the East. I had two young cousins (both young ladies) visit me in Berlin, about the same time you were there. They were traveling through eastern Europe, and flew into East Berlin, then across via the Brandenburg Gate. I was more nervous than they were!

I’m also trying to “revive” my meager German skills. It’s hard at this age! But it’s fun!

Alles gute!