Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Chuck: Chuck here, Upper-Beginner Season 2 Lesson 23 - At the German doctor’s. Hello and welcome to GermanPod101.com. The fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn German. I`m joined in the studio by.
Judith: Hello everyone, Judith here.
Chuck: In this lesson you’ll learn how to see a doctor in Germany.
Judith: This conversation takes place at the reception of a general physician in Berlin.
Chuck: The conversation is between Paul and the receptionist, later also the doctor himself.
Judith: The speakers are in a professional relationship, therefore they’ll be speaking formal German.
Chuck: Let`s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Sprechstundenhilfe: Guten Tag!
Paul: Guten Tag, mein Name ist Paul Martens. Ich möchte zum Arzt.
Sprechstundenhilfe: Haben Sie einen Termin?
Paul: Nein, aber es geht mir ganz schlecht.
Sprechstundenhilfe: Okay. Darf ich Ihre Krankenkassenkarte sehen? Und ich brauche die 10 Euro Gebühr.
Paul: Ja, hier.
Sprechstundenhilfe: Danke. Bitte setzen Sie sich noch einen Moment ins Wartezimmer. Ich rufe Sie auf, wenn Sie dran sind.
...
Sprechstundenhilfe: Herr Martens bitte!
...
Ärztin: Guten Tag, Herr... Martens.
Paul: Guten Tag.
Ärztin: Sind Sie hier für eine Routine-Untersuchung oder ein akutes Problem?
Paul: Ein Problem. Ich fühle mich sehr krank; ich habe Fieber und Schmerzen.
Ärztin: Wo genau tut es weh?
Paul: Mein ganzer Körper tut weh.
Judith: Now it’s slowly.
Sprechstundenhilfe: Guten Tag!
Paul: Guten Tag, mein Name ist Paul Martens. Ich möchte zum Arzt.
Sprechstundenhilfe: Haben Sie einen Termin?
Paul: Nein, aber es geht mir ganz schlecht.
Sprechstundenhilfe: Okay. Darf ich Ihre Krankenkassenkarte sehen? Und ich brauche die 10 Euro Gebühr.
Paul: Ja, hier.
Sprechstundenhilfe: Danke. Bitte setzen Sie sich noch einen Moment ins Wartezimmer. Ich rufe Sie auf, wenn Sie dran sind.
...
Sprechstundenhilfe: Herr Martens bitte!
...
Ärztin: Guten Tag, Herr... Martens.
Paul: Guten Tag.
Ärztin: Sind Sie hier für eine Routine-Untersuchung oder ein akutes Problem?
Paul: Ein Problem. Ich fühle mich sehr krank; ich habe Fieber und Schmerzen.
Ärztin: Wo genau tut es weh?
Paul: Mein ganzer Körper tut weh.
Judith: Now with the translation.
Sprechstundenhilfe: Guten Tag!
Receptionist: Hello!
Paul: Guten Tag, mein Name ist Paul Martens. Ich möchte zum Arzt.
Paul: Hello, my name is Paul Martens. I would like to see the doctor.
Sprechstundenhilfe: Haben Sie einen Termin?
Receptionist: Do you have an appointment?
Paul: Nein, aber es geht mir ganz schlecht.
Paul: No, but I'm really unwell.
Sprechstundenhilfe: Okay. Darf ich Ihre Krankenkassenkarte sehen? Und ich brauche die 10 Euro Gebühr.
Receptionist: Okay. May I see your health insurance card? And I need the 10 EUR fee.
Paul: Ja, hier.
Paul: Yes, here.
Sprechstundenhilfe: Danke. Bitte setzen Sie sich noch einen Moment ins Wartezimmer. Ich rufe Sie auf, wenn Sie dran sind.
Receptionist: Thanks. Please sit down in the waiting room for a moment. I shall call you up when it's your turn.
...
Sprechstundenhilfe: Herr Martens bitte!
Receptionist: Mr Martens please!
...
Ärztin: Guten Tag, Herr... Martens.
Doctor: Hello, Mr... Martens.
Paul: Guten Tag.
Paul: Hello.
Ärztin: Sind Sie hier für eine Routine-Untersuchung oder ein akutes Problem?
Doctor: Are you here for a routine examination or an acute issue?
Paul: Ein Problem. Ich fühle mich sehr krank; ich habe Fieber und Schmerzen.
Paul: An issue. I feel very sick; I have a fever and pain.
Ärztin: Wo genau tut es weh?
Doctor: Where exactly does it hurt?
Paul: Mein ganzer Körper tut weh.
Paul: My entire body hurts.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Judith: Ok, we will continue this in the next lesson, but for now let’s have some recommendations about seeing a doctor in Germany.
Chuck: Alright. Bring along your health insurance card, and if you don’t have one then definitely bring cash along.
Judith: Yeah, I don’t know any doctor who would accept a credit card payment, because almost all Germans have a health insurance card anyway.
Chuck: Well, it’s required by law to have health insurance.
Judith: Yeah, well… Also, bring a lot of time. You may have to wait for up to two hours if you don’t have an appointment or if there are urgent cases ahead of you. For this reason, I also recommend making an appointment.
Chuck: You’ll certainly find a lot of magazines in the waiting room so it’s a good chance to read German, but you may want to bring something else to pass the time.
Judith: Also, doctors may offer services that are not covered by health insurance. For example, nicer teeth replacements or additional examinations. You won’t hear many such offers though and you can safely decline all of them. If you do choose a paid service and you have a health insurance card, you will receive an invoice later so you don’t need to bring the money.
Chuck: You do however need to bring the [Praxisgebühr], so practice fee of 10 euros which is supposed to discourage people from seeing the doctor for every little woe. Let`s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
Chuck: The first word we shall see is.
Judith: [Arzt]
Chuck: “Doctor” or “physician”.
Judith: [Arzt, Arzt, der Arzt] and the plural is [Ärzte].
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Termin]
Chuck: Appointment.
Judith: [Termin, Termin, der Termin] and the plural is [Termine].
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Krankenkasse]
Chuck: Health insurance company.
Judith: [Krankenkasse, Krankenkasse, die Krankenkasse] and the plural is [Krankenkassen].
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Gebühr]
Chuck: Fee.
Judith: [Gebühr, Gebühr, die Gebühr] and the plural is [Gebühren].
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Aufrufen]
Chuck: To call up.
Judith: [Aufrufen, aufrufen] and the [Auf] splits off.
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Dran sein]
Chuck: It’s one’s turn.
Judith: [Dran sein, dran sein]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Routine]
Chuck: Routine.
Judith: [Routine, Routine, die Routine]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Untersuchung]
Chuck: “Examination” or “checkup”.
Judith: [Untersuchung, Untersuchung, die Untersuchung] and the plural is [Untersuchungen].
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Akut]
Chuck: “Acute” or “acutely”.
Judith: [Akut, akut]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Krank]
Chuck: “Ill” or “sick”.
Judith: [Krank, krank]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Fieber]
Chuck: Fever.
Judith: [Fieber, Fieber, das Fieber]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Schmerz]
Chuck: “Pain” or “ache”.
Judith: [Schmerz, Schmerz, der Schmerz] and the plural is [Schmerzen].
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Wehtun]
Chuck: “To hurt” or “be painful”.
Judith: [Wehtun, wehtun]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: [Körper]
Chuck: Body.
Judith: [Körper, Körper, der Körper] and the plural is the same.
Chuck: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Judith: The first phrase we'll look at is [Dran sein].
Chuck: Meaning “it’s your turn”.
Judith: In German, “it’s your turn” is [Du bist dran], “it’s his turn” is [Er ist dran], and “it’s her turn” is [Sie ist dran]. You get the idea. Then, if you say [Einen Moment] or [Einen Moment lang], the [Lang] would have to be translated as “for”, “for a moment”. Similarly, [Eine Woche lang] means “for one week”. [Zwei Monate lang].
Chuck: For two months.
Judith: [Fünf Jahre lang]
Chuck: For five years.
Judith: It will take some getting used to.
Chuck: The focus of this lesson are compound nouns. As you’ve seen on plenty of occasions, German nouns are often shoved together. The higher the level of language, the more likely it is that you will see huge compounds of nouns. But even in everyday language there are a fair amount of them.
Judith: There’s no upper limit as to how many nouns you can put into a single compound noun. However, in everyday language most compounds consist of only two parts or three at maximum.
Chuck: What’s that one German word that’s so long?
Judith: Oh, there’s a game that we play to make a word longer and longer until someone can no longer find any word to add. It starts with [Mississippidampfschifffahrtskapitänsmützenfarbe] or something like that.
Chuck: Well, anyway, you can see compound nouns enrich the language. However, they’re not as straightforward as you might hope. For one thing, compounds don’t consist of just two nouns. There may be verb stems or preposition prefixes involved, and also in between sounds like…
Judith: Like ES or EN, simply S or N.
Chuck: They’re there for the flow. Plus the nouns may be singular or plural.
Judith: Another thing is that the semantic relation between the two nouns can be very different. For example, [Schweineschnitzel] is definitely a schnitzel made of pork as opposed to a [Kalbschnitzel], which is made of calf meat.
Chuck: But wait, there’s [Jäger] schnitzel.
Judith: Yeah, [Jägerschnitzel] is most definitely not made of hunter. I mean [Jäger] means “hunter”. [Jägerschnitzel] is a schnitzel hunter-style.
Chuck: That’s also a problem with [Kinderschokolade], for instance.
Judith: Yeah, it does not contain children.
Chuck: Let’s have some examples of compound nouns for this lesson.
Judith: [Sprechstundenhilfe] consists first of the plural of [Sprechstunde].
Chuck: Consultation hour.
Judith: And then [Hilfe].
Chuck: Help.
Judith: So someone that helps doctors manage their consultation hours. Then we had [Krankenkassenkarte]. [Krankenkasse].
Chuck: Health insurance company.
Judith: And we have an additional N for the flow, or maybe it’s plural but I really don’t see the card belonging to more than one company, and then we have [Karte].
Chuck: A card that identifies you’re the member of a health insurance company.
Judith: Then we had [Wartezimmer]. [Wartezimmer] consists of the verb [Warten].
Chuck: To wait.
Judith: Without the N. All verbs remove the N when they’re combined like this. And then we have [Zimmer].
Chuck: Room.
Judith: So it’s a room for waiting.
Chuck: A waiting room.
Judith: And finally we had [Routineuntersuchung]. This consists of [Routine].
Chuck: Routine.
Judith: And [Untersuchung].
Chuck: “Examination” or “checkup”. So a “routine checkup”.
Judith: This one is still most straight forward, without anything funny added in the middle, but it’s also quite rare among German compound nouns.
Chuck: I know my favorite compound noun is [Remotedesktopverbindung].
Judith: Hahaha. But the [Remote] would be separate because it’s English.
Chuck: It`s actually all one word in Windows.
Judith: Ok, maybe they spelled it like that but they shouldn`t have.
OUTRO
Chuck: Ok, anyway, that just about does it for today.
Chuck: Like our podcasts?
Judith: Then like our Facebook page, too.
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Judith: Just search for GermanPod101.com and like our Fanpage.
Chuck: And if you like our lesson or series at GermanPod101.com
Judith: Let us know.
Chuck: Just click the like button, next to the lesson or series. We hope you enjoyed this lesson. See you next week!
Judith: Wir hoffen euch hat diese Lektion gefallen, bis nächste Woche!

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GermanPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hallo! Hope you all are fit and fine :)

But just incase, how would you say to a doctor that you have stomach pain?  Do reply, du bist dran! 

 

Regards,

Germanpod101.com

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GermanPod101.com
Monday at 5:12 pm
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Hi Addie,


Very well done! As a bit of extra info, you could also say "Magenschmerzen" or "Bauchschmerzen" in German - we often use plural with "pain".


Keep up the good work!


Katrin

Team GermanPod101.com

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Addie
Saturday at 9:31 am
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Guten Tag! Ich habe Magenschmerz\Bauchschmerz.

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GermanPod101.com
Monday at 6:06 pm
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Hi Agnès,


well done! I really like the explanation you give for the stomach pain.


Herr Doktor, ich habe Bauchschmerzen.

Ich habe zu viel Schokolade gegessen!


sounds very good.


Thank you!


Katrin

Team GermanPod101.com

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Agnès
Friday at 12:52 am
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Herr Doktor, I habe Bauchschmerzen.

I habe zu viele Schokolade gegessen!


In the expansion with audio for untersuchung we read examination and hear appointment as well as in the replay.