Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Chuck: Chuck here. Upper Beginner Season 1, Lesson 17. How Not to Dodge Fares in Germany! Hello and welcome back to germanpod101.com, the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn German. I am joined in the studio by
Judith: Hello everyone. Judith here.
Chuck: In this lesson, you will learn how to get information about public transport tickets.
Judith: This conversation takes place inside the subway station in Munich.
Chuck: The conversation is between Joe Cardigan and a couple of strangers.
Judith: The speakers are strangers. Therefore they will be speaking formal German.
Chuck: Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Joe: Ähm, Entschuldigung. Könnt ihr mir helfen?
Typ: Natürlich. Wobei denn?
Joe: Ich brauche eine Fahrkarte für die U-Bahn. Woher habt ihr denn eure Fahrkarten?
Typ: Fahrkarten gibt es da vorne am Automaten.
Joe: Ah, da ist der Automat.
Frau: Wissen Sie, wie Sie am Automaten Ihre Fahrkarte bekommen?
Joe: Hmm, nein, eigentlich nicht. Sonst kaufe ich meine Fahrkarte immer in einem Laden.
Frau: Okay, kommen Sie. Ich zeige es Ihnen schnell.
Joe: Oh, vielen Dank.
Frau: Also, wohin möchten Sie fahren?
Joe: Zuerst möchte ich zum Rosenheimer Platz fahren und später noch zur Giselastraße.
Frau: Hmm, ich glaube, dann sollten Sie eine Tageskarte kaufen.
Joe: Eine Tageskarte? Kann ich mit der Tageskarte den ganzen Tag fahren?
Frau: Ja genau. Die Karte gilt den ganzen Tag und Sie können mit allen Verkehrsmitteln fahren.
Joe: Oh, das ist gut! Und wie teuer ist die Tageskarte?
Frau: Wenn Sie nur im Innenraum fahren, kostet die Tageskarte 5,20€.
Joe: Oh, das ist ja super. Dann nehme ich natürlich eine Tageskarte.
Frau: Okay, dann drücken Sie einfach hier auf Tageskarte und dann auf Innenraum. Jetzt stecken Sie Ihr Geld in den Automaten …. Und da kommt Ihr Fahrschein!
Joe: Super! Danke!
Joe: Ähm, Entschuldigung. Könnt ihr mir helfen?
Typ: Natürlich. Wobei denn?
Joe: Ich brauche eine Fahrkarte für die U-Bahn. Woher habt ihr denn eure Fahrkarten?
Typ: Fahrkarten gibt es da vorne am Automaten.
Joe: Ah, da ist der Automat.
Frau: Wissen Sie, wie Sie am Automaten Ihre Fahrkarte bekommen?
Joe: Hmm, nein, eigentlich nicht. Sonst kaufe ich meine Fahrkarte immer in einem Laden.
Frau: Okay, kommen Sie. Ich zeige es Ihnen schnell.
Joe: Oh, vielen Dank.
Frau: Also, wohin möchten Sie fahren?
Joe: Zuerst möchte ich zum Rosenheimer Platz fahren und später noch zur Giselastraße.
Frau: Hmm, ich glaube, dann sollten Sie eine Tageskarte kaufen.
Joe: Eine Tageskarte? Kann ich mit der Tageskarte den ganzen Tag fahren?
Frau: Ja genau. Die Karte gilt den ganzen Tag und Sie können mit allen Verkehrsmitteln fahren.
Joe: Oh, das ist gut! Und wie teuer ist die Tageskarte?
Frau: Wenn Sie nur im Innenraum fahren, kostet die Tageskarte 5,20€.
Joe: Oh, das ist ja super. Dann nehme ich natürlich eine Tageskarte.
Frau: Okay, dann drücken Sie einfach hier auf Tageskarte und dann auf Innenraum. Jetzt stecken Sie Ihr Geld in den Automaten …. Und da kommt Ihr Fahrschein!
Joe: Super! Danke!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Judith: All right. Joe is staying in Munich inner city but for our cultural point today, we will leave it behind and explore the outskirts, the suburbs.
Chuck: In German residential areas depending on what area you are in, you will see everything from detached homes with gardens in front of them to apartment buildings with smallish playgrounds in the backyard. The rather narrow streets always have sidewalls and most of the time a separated bike path too. You notice also that the backyards are much smaller than what you will find typically in say American suburbs.
Judith: Yeah but also the suburbs are not as far out there as they are in America.
Chuck: It’s true. There is pretty much always public transportation to get you into the city.
Judith: Yes.
Chuck: Even if you are in a pretty small town.
Judith: Uhoo and there are small shops selling products of everyday life, there are barbers, bakeries and some small supermarkets in the near surroundings. So you don’t have to go far to get everything you need. Of course the really large supermarkets, the Do it yourself stores and so on are usually small distance outside of the residential area either in the city center or really far outside town.
Chuck: Preschool, kindergarten and elementary schools are often found near the residential areas sometimes even directly inside them. As there are several different types of secondary schools they need to be more centers so that everyone can reach them as easy as possible. Therefore they are usually near the town center or at least somewhere you can easily go by bus from most suburbs in the surrounding area.
Judith: Churches are usually spread all over town. If you are in a rather old or small city, there is usually a single church in the town center and then a few in the suburbs. This is a relic of medieval times when town just meant a few houses standing near one another and the church marked the center.
Chuck: Oh but I have a question. I know in Berlin, there are lots of 24-hour stores but I know in smaller towns, they don’t have them. What do you do then if like say in the evening, you just need like a roll of toilet paper?
Judith: Well it can be quite hard to find anything. Your best bet are the gas stations.
Chuck: Ah yeah.
Judith: Gas stations are open 24 hours but apart from that, especially in rural areas, no way. Also on Sundays, no way.
Chuck: Yeah so you should know where your nearest gas station is even if you don’t have a car.
VOCAB LIST
Chuck: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word is
Judith: Wobei.
Chuck: At what or with what.
Judith: Wobei. Wobei.
Chuck: Next
Judith: Euer.
Chuck: Your, plural.
Judith: Euer. Euer.
Chuck: Next
Judith: Ihr.
Chuck: Your, formal.
Judith: Ihr. Ihr.
Chuck: Next
Judith: Zeigen.
Chuck: To show or indicate.
Judith: Zeigen. Zeigen.
Chuck: Next
Judith: Tageskarte.
Chuck: Day pass.
Judith: Tageskarte. Tageskarte. Die Tageskarte and the plural is Tageskarten.
Chuck: Next
Judith: Gelten.
Chuck: To be valid, to be valued.
Judith: Gelten. Gelten. And this is a vowel changing verb. So the third person is es gilt.
Chuck: Next
Judith: Mittel.
Chuck: Means or instrument.
Judith: Mittel. Mittel. Das Mittel and the plural is the same.
Chuck: Next
Judith: Verkehrsmittel.
Chuck: Means of transportation.
Judith: Verkehrsmittel. Verkehrsmittel. Neuter and the plural is the same.
Chuck: Next
Judith: Teuer.
Chuck: Expensive.
Judith: Teuer. Teuer.
Chuck: Next
Judith: Innen or drinnen.
Chuck: Inside.
Judith: Innen. Drinnen. Innen. Drinnen.
Chuck: Next
Judith: Innenraum.
Chuck: Inner room or inner part of the city.
Judith: Innenraum. Innenraum. Der Innenraum and the plural is Innenräume.
Chuck: Next.
Judith: Stecken.
Chuck: To put or stick.
Judith: Stecken. Stecken.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Chuck: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Judith: The first word is wobei.
Chuck: At what.
Judith: It’s derived from bei of course and the wo doesn’t mean anything here. It only serves to make it a question word. You find lots of question words created that way. For example, womit
Chuck: With what.
Judith: Wofür.
Chuck: For what.
Judith: Wogegen.
Chuck: Against what.
Judith: And so on. So why is that guy asking Wobei können wir helfen?
Chuck: At what can we help?
Judith: Literally yeah. The reason is that Germans would use bei to give a purpose. For example, Bei der Reise helfen.
Chuck: Help with the journey.
Judith: In the end saying to help at something may be illogical but to help with something isn’t much more logical either. It’s something you have to get used to when learning languages.
Chuck: Yeah you should.
Judith: Another thing is the phrase Sie sollten.
Chuck: You should.
Judith: Yes. Just like möchte the form sollten is an advanced form that we will explain later.
LESSON FOCUS
Judith: The focus of this lesson is an overview of the possessive pronouns.
Chuck: With this lesson, you’ve finally seen all the possessive pronouns. Let’s have an overview.
Judith: From ich we get mein.
Chuck: My.
Judith: From du, dein.
Chuck: Your informally.
Judith: Er and es both turn into sein.
Chuck: His or its.
Judith: Sie turns into ihr.
Chuck: Her.
Judith: Wir turns into unser.
Chuck: Our.
Judith: Ihr turns into euer.
Chuck: Your plural.
Judith: Sie turns into Ihr.
Chuck: Their.
Judith: And if you capitalize both of them, the formal Sie turns into Ihr with a capital I.
Chuck: Your formally.
Judith: In summary, we have mein, dein, sein or ihr and then in the plural, unser, euer and Ihr.
Chuck: If you look at this table in the lesson notes, there is an important thing to note.
Judith: It is that ihr is used an awful lot. For her, their, and your formally. However, strangely enough, it is not used for you plural.
Chuck: The personal pronoun for you plural is Ihr but the pronoun showing possession is euer.
Judith: Also note that sein is used for both his and it’s and it’s not related to the verb sein.
OUTRO
Chuck: That just about does it for today. Remember, you can leave us a comment on this lesson.
Judith: So if you have a question or some feedback, please leave us a comment.
Chuck: It is very easy to do. Just stop by germanpod101.com
Judith: Click on comments
Chuck: Enter your comment and name
Judith: And that’s it.
Chuck: No excuses. We are looking forward to hearing from you. So see you on the site.
Judith: Also, wir sehen uns online.

15 Comments

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GermanPod101.com
Wednesday at 6:30 pm
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Wo habt ihr von GermanPod101 gehört?

Where did you hear about GermanPod101?

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Ray
Monday at 4:11 pm
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In the phrase "woher habt ihr denn eure Fahrkarten" shouldn't eure be spelt euer?

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GermanPod101.com
Friday at 2:14 pm
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Hi Stuart,


The most common usage of "gelten" is "being valid" "Das Ticket gilt als Fahrschein." vor example would be "The ticket counts as a bus ticket."


I hope this helps!


Regards,

Katrin

Team GermanPod101.com

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Stuart
Thursday at 11:29 am
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In the dialogue for definitions of words, Joe's definition of gelten is confusing, and does not seem to match the written definition in the pdf. Would you please clarify the definition?

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GermanPod101.com
Friday at 3:22 pm
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Hi Ali,


Thank you for telling us! I will pass on your comment to our technical department to get it fixed/added.


Please try the steps, contained in this page: https://www.germanpod101.com/learningcenter/account/myfeed

Enjoy learning with us!


Katrin

Team GermanPod101.com

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Ali
Thursday at 6:59 pm
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Hi


When I downloaded this audio file to my iphone, I noticed that it is Uknown Album , so it was'n appear with other audios from this lesson. (the same for lesson 4 and 7 dialog audio).


Thank you again for this efforts.

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GermanPod101.com
Monday at 8:45 am
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Hi Sarah,


I think the reason "Könnt ihr mir helfen?" is used here, cause the group he is speaking to consist of young people - so he uses informal German to address all of them. The person he then talks to may appear older, so he uses "Sie" when speaking with him.

You are totally correct, if he were to address a group of strangers, it would be more common to use "Sie" "Könne Sie mir helfen?" to address them, using formal German.


Thank you for writing!


Katrin

Team GermanPod101.com

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Sarah
Saturday at 7:54 am
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I'm also confused by the use of "ihr" in "Konnt ihr mir helfen?" since this is supposed to be a formal relationship between the speakers. I know Joe is addressing two people, but wouldn't you still use Sie, as in "Konnen Sie mir helfen?" since Sie is formal and can be singular or plural?

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GermanPod101.com
Saturday at 2:29 pm
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Hello Franck,


Thank you for your patience on this!


Cheers,

Neha

Team GermanPod101.com

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Franck
Friday at 4:26 pm
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08/02/13


Cool, thanks!

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GermanPod101.com
Friday at 11:41 am
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Hi Franck,


Thank you for writing to us!

We are in the process of updating the lessons at the moment, we will fix this as soon as possible.

Again, thank you for letting us know!


Katrin

Team GermanPod101.com