Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Chuck: This is Intermediate Series Lesson 3.
Judith: [Willkommen zurück].
Chuck: Welcome back to GermanPod101. With us, you’ll learn how to speak German with fun and effective lessons.
Judith: We also provide you with cultural insights.
Chuck: And tips you won’t find in a textbook.
Judith: In this lesson, you will learn how to speak German while under the influence of jetlag.
Chuck: I think it’s a bit harder than you imagine. We also have some tips for you on how to overcome jetlag when flying into Germany. Well, I guess these would also be valid for Austria and Switzerland, wouldn’t they?
Judith: Of course. Or even any other European country. Or if you’re flying to Japan… Who knows, you know.
Chuck: No, they’re only valid for German speaking countries.
Judith: Anyway, if you later want to review this or any other part of the lesson, go to GermanPod101.com and look at the lesson notes PDF.
Chuck: The PDF contains everything you can glean from a lesson; the dialogue, the dialogue translation, the grammar, cultural section, the vocabulary…
Judith: And the PDF even contains one thing that the lessons don’t - many sample sentences for the vocabulary items.
Chuck: These show you in more detail how words are used, what prepositions or what cases are associated with them.
Judith: Of course you can also find the sample sentences in the expansion section of the Learning Center.
Chuck: Alright, enough about the Learning Center. Let’s listen to this dialogue between Mike and his German friend. So first morning in Germany for him and Mike is quite tired, to say the least.
DIALOGUE
D: Guten Morgen, Mike! Es ist Zeit aufzustehen!
A: Uahh, ich bin noch soo müde! Ich will noch schlafen! Kann ich nicht noch weiterschlafen?
D: Es ist schon 11 Uhr! Wenn Sie noch länger schlafen, gewöhnen Sie sich nie an deutsche Zeiten. Komm, stehen Sie auf! Das Frühstück ist schon fertig. Wenn Sie wollen, können Sie erst essen und dann erst duschen.
A: Okay, ich komme gleich.
...
D: So, was haben Sie heute vor, Mike?
A: Außer schlafen?
D: Ja, außer schlafen. Wollen Sie die Sehenswürdigkeiten sehen?
A: Ich weiß nicht. Vielleicht lieber, wenn ich nicht so müde bin.
D: Okay, dann machen wir das an einem anderen Tag.
A: Vielleicht können wir heute an meinem Lebenslauf arbeiten? Wenn ich mich für einen Job in Deutschland bewerben will, brauche ich einen deutschen Lebenslauf. Helfen Sie mir dabei?
D: Natürlich helfe ich Ihnen.
Judith: Now read slowly.
D: Guten Morgen, Mike! Es ist Zeit aufzustehen!
A: Uahh, ich bin noch soo müde! Ich will noch schlafen! Kann ich nicht noch weiterschlafen?
D: Es ist schon 11 Uhr! Wenn Sie noch länger schlafen, gewöhnen Sie sich nie an deutsche Zeiten. Komm, stehen Sie auf! Das Frühstück ist schon fertig. Wenn Sie wollen, können Sie erst essen und dann erst duschen.
A: Okay, ich komme gleich.
...
D: So, was haben Sie heute vor, Mike?
A: Außer schlafen?
D: Ja, außer schlafen. Wollen Sie die Sehenswürdigkeiten sehen?
A: Ich weiß nicht. Vielleicht lieber, wenn ich nicht so müde bin.
D: Okay, dann machen wir das an einem anderen Tag.
A: Vielleicht können wir heute an meinem Lebenslauf arbeiten? Wenn ich mich für einen Job in Deutschland bewerben will, brauche ich einen deutschen Lebenslauf. Helfen Sie mir dabei?
D: Natürlich helfe ich Ihnen.
Judith: Now with the translation.
D: Guten Morgen, Mike! Es ist Zeit aufzustehen!
D: Good morning, Mike. It is time to get up!
A: Uahh, ich bin noch soo müde! Ich will noch schlafen! Kann ich nicht noch weiterschlafen?
A: Uahh, I am still sooo tired! I want to sleep! Can't I sleep some more?
D: Es ist schon 11 Uhr! Wenn Sie noch länger schlafen, gewöhnen Sie sich nie an deutsche Zeiten. Komm, stehen Sie auf! Das Frühstück ist schon fertig. Wenn Sie wollen, können Sie erst essen und dann erst duschen.
D: It's already 11 o'clock! If you don't stand up now, you will never get used to German times. Come on, stand up! Breakfast is already made. If you want you can eat first and shower afterward.
A: Okay, ich komme gleich.
A: Okay, I am coming in a moment.
...
D: So, was haben Sie heute vor, Mike?
D: So, what do you want to do today, Mike?
A: Außer schlafen?
A: Apart from sleeping?
D: Ja, außer schlafen. Wollen Sie die Sehenswürdigkeiten sehen?
D: Yes, apart from sleeping. Do you want to see the sights?
A: Ich weiß nicht. Vielleicht lieber, wenn ich nicht so müde bin.
A: I don't know. Maybe rather when I am not that tired?
D: Okay, dann machen wir das an einem anderen Tag.
D: Okay, then we do this on another day.
A: Vielleicht können wir heute an meinem Lebenslauf arbeiten? Wenn ich mich für einen Job in Deutschland bewerben will, brauche ich einen deutschen Lebenslauf. Helfen Sie mir dabei?
A: Maybe we can work on my CV today? If I want to apply for a Job in Germany, I will need a German CV. Will you help me with this?
D: Natürlich helfe ich Ihnen.
D: Of course I help you.
VOCAB LIST
Judith: First word is [Lebenslauf].
Chuck: Americans say “resume” and British, and actually Europe in general, say CV.
Judith: [Lebenslauf, Lebenslauf, der Lebenslauf] by the way, cause it’s [der Lauf]. Next [Wollen].
Chuck: To want.
Judith: [Wollen, wollen] This verb is irregular, we’ll talk about it in the grammar section. [Weiter]
Chuck: “Continue to” or “some more” or “further”.
Judith: [Yes for example, weiterschlafen]
Chuck: To keep on sleeping.
Judith: Yes, “sleep some more”, “continue to sleep”, something like that.
Chuck: Or [Geh weiter], “keep going”.
Judith: Then we have [Wenn].
Chuck: “If” or “when”.
Judith: [Wenn] This word only means “when” when you’re talking about something in the future. If you’re talking about something in the past you have to say [Als].
Chuck: That note was for me, wasn’t it?
Judith: Ok, next word. [Noch länger]
Chuck: Even longer.
Judith: [Noch länger, noch länger]. [Sich gewöhnen]
Chuck: To get used to something.
Judith: Yes, [Sich gewöhnen and we say sich an etwas gewöhnen].
Chuck: To get used to something.
Judith: Next. [Nie]
Chuck: Never.
Judith: [Nie] Next. [Erst]
Chuck: “First” or “only then”.
Judith: [Erst] Yes, “only then” - this meaning is particularly in combination with [Dann] so [Dann erst], “only then". Next. [Vorhaben]
Chuck: To have planned.
Judith: [Vorhaben, vorhaben] The [Vor] splits off and the rest behaves like the verb [Haben]. Next [Außer].
Chuck: Except.
Judith: [Außer, außer] Next. [Lieber]
Chuck: “Rather” or “would prefer”.
Judith: [Lieber, lieber] This is an adverb. It’s not a verb like in English. Next [Sich bewerben]
Chuck: To apply.
Judith: [Sich bewerben, sich bewerben]
Chuck: To apply.
Judith: Next, [Helfen].
Chuck: To help.
Judith: [Helfen, helfen] This is a vowel changing verb, so for the second and third person singular you will see an I in there instead of an [E]. Notice the sentence [Hilfst du mir?].
Chuck: Will you help me?
Judith: Yes. And the answer in this dialogue was [Natürlich helfe ich dir]. Anyway, that was the last word, [Natürlich].
Chuck: “Naturally” or “of course”.
Judith: [Natürlich] It can also mean “natural”. For example, you might see [Natürliches Mineralwasser].
CULTURAL INSIGHTS
Chuck: “Natural mineral water”. Wow, I can really relate to Mike though. I mean I remember some of the times I came to Germany, especially the first times I came to Germany and I just was like 1 or 2 in the afternoon and I just couldn’t wake up. Just wah.
Judith: Wow.
Chuck: I just felt so horrible.
Judith: Yeah, you’ve traveled a lot, more than I have. So do you have some tips for our traveling listeners.
Chuck: Well, there’s one I don’t usually abide by but I hear it’s a good tip and that’s don’t drink alcohol within 48 hours of landing. And that also includes the flight, although some find it helpful to help them relax on the flight but generally if you really want to survive jetlag well, like especially on a business trip, it’s best to avoid alcohol. And drink lots of water instead. One thing good about drinking water too is if you’re just arriving and the fact that you have to wake up and use the bathroom will help you get up.
Judith: That’s mean though.
Chuck: Well, it helps.
Judith: Well, what I try do when I fly abroad is to use this excitement of being abroad to keep me awake. I remember the first time that I flew outside of Europe, I flew to Montreal actually, and I was meeting with friends there who allowed me to stay with them for about a month and I was just so excited that I totally didn’t notice how tired I was.
Chuck: Yeah. It can also help to try to plan your trip so that you arrive right before it’s time to sleep, but that’s pretty hard to plan that every time.
Judith: Yeah, sometimes you can’t find the right flights. But still, you should try to, like, stay awake until it’s somewhat reasonable time to go to sleep. Like maybe 8 PM or something.
Chuck: Yeah, that sounds right. It’s hard.
LESSON FOCUS
Judith: Ok, and now what about grammar?
Chuck: We still have to do grammar? Didn’t we do that in the last lesson?
Judith: You’re not done with German grammar. This is the Intermediate Series. The Advanced series we assume that people know all the grammar -
Chuck: Hey, like me.
Judith: But in the Intermediate Series we have to teach them intermediate grammar.
Chuck: Yeah. Cause I know all the grammar too, just like those advanced people.
Judith: I don’t think so actually, but let’s not go there.
Chuck: I do. I know it all.
Judith: And today we do the verb [Wollen].
Chuck: To want.
Judith: [Wollen] is an important German verb. It’s not as commonly used as the English equivalent but still… Actually that’s a funny story because here we teach children not to say [Ich will] because it sounds egoistic. I don't know if you do that in the States. I don’t think so, do you?
Chuck: I don’t think so either.
Judith: It’s quite fine to say “I want”, right? But in German [Ich will] just sounds… I don't know. So they’re taught to say [Ich möchte] instead, it’s “I would like”. And you still have to master [Wollen] of course because it will appear to you in the other forms, like [Er will] or [Du willst] or [Wollen Sie] or something. So you can’t say you mastered German if you don’t know that verb.
Chuck: Ok, I might want to say [Ich will something] not, right?
Judith: [Ich will das nicht]?
Chuck: Yeah.
Judith: Yeah, that works too though [Ich möchte das nicht] also works. I don't know. Anyway, here are the forms: [Ich will]
Chuck: I want.
Judith: [Du willst]
Chuck: You want.
Judith: [Er will]
Chuck: He wants.
Judith: [Wir wollen].
Chuck: We want.
Judith: [Ihr wollt]
Chuck: You all want.
Judith: [Sie wollen].
Chuck: They want.
Judith: You really need to memorize these well and then not use them when you say something about yourself.
Chuck: Still not terrible to say about yourself, it’s just not recommended.
Judith: Yeah. Since that was so easy, let’s have a look at another short grammar point that is the conditional sentences in German. Cause in this dialogue, actually, we had a few easy ones. For example, [Wenn du willst kannst du erst essen].
Chuck: If you want you can eat first.
Judith: So this is quite easy. We have present tense in both cases and the only difficult part would be that the verb and the subject are inverted again because the verb has to come in second position and this [Wenn] clause counts as something and then the verb comes immediately after.
Chuck: So notice that “If you want, can you first eat”.
Judith: Exactly. But other than that it’s quite like in English. So, for example, also [Wenn du noch länger schläfst, gewöhnst du dich nie an deutsche Zeiten].
Chuck: If you’re sleeping even longer, you’ll never get used to German hours.
Judith: And we even had a third conditional sentence in this dialogue - [Wenn ich mich für einen Job in Deutschland bewerben will, brauche ich einen deutschen Lebenslauf].
Chuck: If I want to apply for a job in Germany, I need a German resume.
Judith: That’s it, yes. So these are quite easy. The difficult part will be when you’re talking about things that might have been. We’ll get to those later.
Chuck: That sounds really complicated.
Judith: It’s not that complicated either but let’s not do it all in one lesson.
OUTRO
Chuck: Yeah, since I already know all the grammar I'm sure it’s no problem for me.
Judith: Yeah, so [That was is for today, das wars für heute].
Chuck: Don’t forget to leave us a comment on this lesson.
Judith: Yeah, or if you have a question or some feedback just write it to us.
Chuck: It’s very easy to do. Just stop by GermanPod101.com.
Judith: Click on comments.
Chuck: Enter your comment and name.
Judith: And that’s it. You don’t even need to register for it.
Chuck: So there’s no excuses now. We’re looking forward to hearing from you.
Judith: Wir freuen uns von euch zu hören.
Chuck: See you next week.
Judith: Bis nächste Woche!

47 Comments

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GermanPod101.com
Wednesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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GermanPod101.comVerified
Monday at 7:19 pm
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Hi Ron,


Thank you for posting.


Please check out the Lesson Materials > Vocabulary. The lesson's vocabulary can be added to your Word Bank or Flashcard Deck. Please select the word by clicking the box on its left and then "add to Word bank" or "add to Flashcard Deck".


If you have any doubts, please let us know :wink:


Cristiane

Team GermanPod101.com

Ron Cohen
Sunday at 6:33 pm
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In the lessons you often mention lesson specific flash cards. I cannot find these online or in the help. I find flash cards, but not lesson specific flash cards. Thank you,

Deniz
Saturday at 8:16 pm
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thanks for the great content

Germanpod101
Friday at 9:40 am
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Hi Tom,


yes, you are right, as Chuck is a non-native German speaker he has an accent.


Best


Jennifer

Team Germanpod101.com

Tom
Wednesday at 7:46 am
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Chuck's pronunciation is totally different to yours

GermanPod101.comVerified
Thursday at 11:38 am
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Thank you for asking us the question. If you finished B-1 course just before, I'd like to ask you to study with our intermediate lessons before you start learning with Advanced course. Beginner should be too easy for you for sure, so please check our intermediate lessons first.


Thank you-

Jae

Team GermanPod101.com

Ich werde nie meinen Löffel abgeben, davor Deutsch zu sprechen können
Thursday at 11:23 am
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Great job! Thanks a lot for both of you! I've just finished my A1-B1 course, and since I don't have much confidence in my current German, I would like to know if this is the kind of records that normally a student with B1 should listen to, or the records in the "Advanced" section?

GermanPod101.comVerified
Monday at 9:19 pm
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Hallo Bigyan,


Thank you for your comment!


:smile: :thumbsup:


Vielen Dank!


Clara

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Bigyan
Tuesday at 6:31 am
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:thumbsup:

GermanPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 12:13 pm
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Hallo Julian,


Gern geschehen! :smile:


Vielen Dank!


Clara

Team GermanPod101.com