Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Judith: Hello [Ich heiße] Judith.
Chuck: Hi I’m Chuck.
Judith: [Sie hören GermanPod101.com]
Chuck: You’re listening to GermanPod101.com. This is the new beginner series lesson 7.
Judith: [Willkommen zurück.]
Chuck: Welcome back.
Judith: How have you been?
Chuck: I hope you’re well and ready to get on with your German. So Judith what should we learn today?
Judith: Today we will learn how to avoid getting lost in Germany.
Chuck: Really, like you’re be able to do that.
Judith: You may still get lost of course but, at least you will know how to ask for the way.
Chuck: I know how to ask for the way. It’s [Wo ist] and, well, wherever you’re looking for.
Judith: Any phrasebook will teach you that much, but we at GermanPod101 will also teach you to understand the response.
Chuck: You know what, that’s pretty useful actually. You know what, I’m glad that GermanPod101 focuses on the German that you really need.
Judith: Let’s get started on this lesson.
Chuck: In today’s dialogue, I’ll be the same American tourist.
Judith: And I will be a random German woman he sees in the street.
Chuck: Hey, random German woman. Hey, random German woman, [Wo ist das Museum der Stadtgeschichte?]
Judith: Eh.
Chuck: Okay, so I guess to say this properly I’ve to say:
DIALOGUE
A: Entschuldigung, wo ist das Museum der Stadtgeschichte?
D: Ah, das ist nicht weit weg. Sehen Sie die Bank da?
A: Ja, die Deutsche Bank?
D: Genau. An der Deutschen Bank gehen Sie rechts und dann an der nächsten Ampel links. Dann gehen Sie immer geradeaus, an den Universitätsgebäuden vorbei…
A: Da ist auch das Krankenhaus, oder?
D: Ach ja, stimmt. Ich war schon lange nicht mehr da... Das Museum ist gegenüber vom Krankenhaus, auf der rechten Straßenseite.
A: Wann waren Sie zum letzten Mal im Museum?
D: Ach, das war noch zu meiner Schulzeit, am Wandertag. Jetzt muss ich los. Viel Spaß im Museum!
A: Vielen Dank, tschüss!
D: Auf Wiedersehen!
Judith: Now read slowly.
A: Entschuldigung, wo ist das Museum der Stadtgeschichte?
D: Ah, das ist nicht weit weg. Sehen Sie die Bank da?
A: Ja, die Deutsche Bank?
D: Genau. An der Deutschen Bank gehen Sie rechts und dann an der nächsten Ampel links. Dann gehen Sie immer geradeaus, an den Universitätsgebäuden vorbei…
A: Da ist auch das Krankenhaus, oder?
D: Ach ja, stimmt. Ich war schon lange nicht mehr da... Das Museum ist gegenüber vom Krankenhaus, auf der rechten Straßenseite.
A: Wann waren Sie zum letzten Mal im Museum?
D: Ach, das war noch zu meiner Schulzeit, am Wandertag. Jetzt muss ich los. Viel Spaß im Museum!
A: Vielen Dank, tschüss!
D: Auf Wiedersehen!
Judith: Now with the translation. Entschuldigung, wo ist das Museum der Stadtgeschichte?
Chuck: Excuse me, where is the museum of city history?
Judith: Ah, das ist nicht weit weg.
Chuck: Ah, that’s not too far away.
Judith: Sehen Sie die Bank da?
Chuck: Do you see the bank there?
Judith: Ja, die Deutsche Bank?
Chuck: Yes, the Deutsche Bank?
Judith: Genau. An der Deutschen Bank gehen Sie rechts und dann an der nächsten Ampel links.
Chuck: Exactly, at the Deutsche Bank turn right, and then turn left at the next traffic light.
Judith: Dann gehen Sie immer geradeaus, an den Universitätsgebäuden vorbei.
Chuck: Then keep going straight, and then pass by the university buildings.
Judith: Da ist auch das Krankenhaus, oder?
Chuck: There’s also the hospital, right?
Judith: Ach ja, stimmt. Ich war schon lange nicht mehr da...
Chuck: Ah, yeah, that’s right. Wasn’t there for a long time.
Judith: Das Museum ist gegenüber vom Krankenhaus, auf der rechten Straßenseite.
Chuck: The museum is across from the hospital on the right side of the street.
Judith: Wann waren Sie zum letzten Mal im Museum?
Chuck: when were you last time in museum?
Judith: Ach, das war noch zu meiner Schulzeit, am Wandertag.
Chuck: Ah, that was back in my school time, on a field trip.
Judith: Jetzt muss ich los. Viel Spaß im Museum!
Chuck: Now I got to go, have fun in the museum.
Judith: Vielen Dank, tschüss!
Chuck: Thank you very much, bye.
Judith: Auf Wiedersehen!
Chuck: Goodbye.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Chuck: So what’s this [Wandertag] anyway, sounds like as a wandering day or something.
Judith: Literally, hiking day. It’s a day when the entire school class spends the day outside the classroom, they may actually go hiking but in more urban areas it’s more likely they will go to a museum or anything else that can count as a real world educational setting.
Chuck: Ah, sounds like fun.
Judith: Yeah, well, for the pupils involved, going to the museum is usually an excuse to go see whatever big city the museum is in. I remember for example we went to the chocolate museum in Cologne and we went to the sports museum in Cologne, and were supposed just reasons to be in Cologne afterwards. Because we would go through the museum very quickly, they’re not particularly large museums, and then we would have the rest of the day to spend in Cologne and go shopping and see the big streets, then may be also see the dome, and, I mean, the big Cathedral. For a contrast what I really found really, really interesting as a museum is Neanderthal Museum in the Neanderthal valley, which is pretty much remote in the middle of nowhere, but it is that great museum about ancient history, and about, well, the Neanderthal men. This museum is very big and very educational, but there’s nothing around it that you can do apart from one astronomy observatory or something. So people don’t actually go there as often, and school classes don’t go there as often, because the kids don’t agree to it, they want to go to a city that features something interesting.
Chuck: Yeah, I think I’d go for the chocolate museum myself. Is there a beer museum?
Judith: I’m sure there must be somewhere.
Chuck: Far in Bavaria.
Judith: I mean you know, you know the cities-- well, I’m not just-- the cities of [the Ruhr] also just competing against each other, you know, who can build small museums, so obviously they will have museums about just about anything you can imagine.
Chuck: And you can have the more delicious chocolate museum?
Judith: I only know of this one museum, chocolate museum, it’s good.
Chuck: I think there’s one in [Xanten] as well.
Judith: That doesn’t compare to the one in Cologne.
Chuck: Of course not.
Judith: What about field trips in the states actually, It’s just the same kind of a deal?
Chuck: Yeah, what I’ve see is more like the afternoon or the morning, not the whole day.
Judith: Well, here in Germany it’s usually the time that you would normally spend in class, so starting from the morning till the early afternoon, maybe. Maybe to late afternoon.
Chuck: That’s right because school days are shorter here, right?
Judith: Yeah.
Chuck: Yeah.
Judith: Go home around 4 or 5 or maybe 6 if already it’s very happy in the city they are visiting.
Chuck: Yeah, I think the most interesting field trip ever I was on that’s in, it’s pretty cool.
Judith: Yeah, I can imagine that would be interesting.
Chuck: Yeah, an hour drive away.
Judith: You’re lucky.
Chuck: Ah, yeah the old days, so I think a lot of our listeners like to take a [Wandertag] to see Cologne and Chocolate museum or something like that. Or actually [Wandermonat]. It’s bright one like it.
Judith: Yes, but I can never understand those people that say, okay, Europe in seven days or something.
Chuck: Yeah, one day for country, that should do it.
Judith: No, Berlin alone you need more than a week.
Chuck: Yeah. I think Berlin is that kind of city like New York, where you could just spend your whole life and never enough to see everything.
Judith: Definitely feels that way.
Chuck: Seems like every time we’ve friends visit they’re like, maybe we should move to Berlin. Yeah, it’s really great here. Anyway enough with Berlin, maybe we should go for the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Judith: Yes [Vokabeln.]
Chuck: Yeah.
Judith: Why you’re happy?
Chuck: Oh, no not the vocabulary.
Judith: That sounds more like the Chuck I know. First word--.
Chuck: No, we skip it?
Judith: No. First word [Museum]
Chuck: Museum actually.
Judith: [Museum.]
Chuck: No it’s museum, you’re pronouncing wrong
Judith: No [Museum]
Chuck: Museum.
Judith: Neuter and the plural is [Museen]
Chuck: Museums.
Judith: And the next word is [Stadt]
Chuck: Town or city.
Judith: [Stadt]
Chuck: Town or city.
Judith: Careful, this is spelled with a DT at the end. [Stadt] and it’s feminine [Die Stadt] and the plural is [Städte.]
Chuck: Towns or cities.
Judith: Next [Geschichte.]
Chuck: History or story.
Judith: This word is feminine [Die Geschichte]
Chuck: History or story.
Judith: And the plural is [Geschichten]
Chuck: Histories or stories.
Judith: Next [Weit weg.]
Chuck: Far away.
Judith: [Weit weg.]
Chuck: Far away.
Judith: Next [Links]
Chuck: Left.
Judith: [Links.]
Chuck: Left.
Judith: Next [Rechts.]
Chuck: Right.
Judith: [Rechts.]
Chuck: Right.
Judith: Next [Nächste.]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: What you want the next one already?
Chuck: Yes, please.
Judith: [Nächste.]
Chuck: Next.
Judith: Next [Ampel]
Chuck: Traffic light.
Judith: [Ampel, Ampel]
Chuck: Traffic light.
Judith: This word is feminine [Die Ampel]
Chuck: The traffic light.
Judith: Next [Immer]
Chuck: Always.
Judith: [Immer, immer]
Chuck: Always.
Judith: Next [Geradeaus]
Chuck: Straight ahead.
Judith: [Geradeaus, geradeaus]
Chuck: Straight ahead. I notice that these words are very, very, often seen together in directions as in [Immer, immer geradeaus] just keep going straight ahead.
Judith: Next [Gebäude]
Chuck: Building. Wait, I thought that was the word for buildings.
Judith: It’s the same, the plural is the same.
Chuck: Okay.
Judith: And it’s neuter [Das Gebäude]
Chuck: The building.
Judith: [Gebäude, Gebäude]
Chuck: Building or buildings.
Judith: Next [Vorbei]
Chuck: Passed.
Judith: [Vorbei, vorbei]
Chuck: Passed, as in like passed the building.
Judith: Yes. Next [Krankenhaus]
Chuck: Hospital.
Judith: This literally means house for sick people [Kranke] sick people [Krankenhaus]
Chuck: Hospital.
Judith: Plural [Krankenhäuser]
Chuck: Hospitals.
Judith: So this is an example of the rule where you take the last word in the compound noun, and this gender applies to the whole thing, and also this plural applies to the whole thing. So house is [Häuser] and that’s the way how you know that [Krankenhaus] will be [Krankenhäuser] and house is neuter [Das Haus] so you know that the whole thing will be neuter. Next [Universität]
Chuck: University.
Judith: [Universität, Universität]
Chuck: University.
Judith: This is also abbreviated as [Uni] it’s feminine [Die Uni, Die Universität] and plural is [Universitäten.]
Chuck: Universities. Yeah, it’s quite often abbreviated to [Uni] it sounds--
Judith: Especially by the students themselves. Nobody ever says [Universität.]
Chuck: Yeah, it sounds much cooler. If you’re saying [Universität] then you’re probably one of the professors who wants to sound more professional.
Judith: Next [Gegenüber]
Chuck: Opposite or across from.
Judith: [Gegenüber, gegenüber]
Chuck: Opposite or across form.
Judith: Next [Letzter]
Chuck: Last.
Judith: [Letzter, letzter]
Chuck: Last.
Judith: And last word for today [Das letzte Wort. Spass]
Chuck: Fun.
Judith: [Spaß, Spaß]
Chuck: Fun.
Judith: This is masculine [Der Spaß]
Chuck: The fun.
Judith: [Die Lektionen machen Spaß, oder?]
Chuck: Yeah.
Judith: GermanPod101 lessons are fun, aren’t they?
Chuck: [Na klar.] I certainly think so. Well, let us know what you think.
Judith: Yes, I’d love to read your comments, just post them underneath this lesson, or you can also send us an Email.
Chuck: You know, I think it’s interesting how fun is in got used the same way in German as is in English, is it?
Judith: No, it’s not.
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Judith: I guess I can talk about word usage now?
Chuck: Sure, can we start with [Spaß then]?
Judith: Yes.
Chuck: Can I try this one?
Judith: Sure.
Chuck: Let’s see. I know that when you want to wish someone a good time you can say [Viel Spaß], right?
Judith: Yes, [Viel Spaß] have fun.
Chuck: Yeah, and if you want to say, like I’m having a good time, instead of I’m having a good time you’d say [Es macht Spaß] it makes fun.
Judith: It is fun in English, but in German we say it makes fun. [Es macht Spaß]
Chuck: Okay, what’s another way you can use it?
Judith: [Er versteht keinen Spaß]
Chuck: Aha, You’re not speaking on me, are you?
Judith: It means he doesn’t understand fun, but there’s a better expression in English I forgot. He can’t take a joke.
Chuck: [Aha. Ich versteh nur Bahnhof.]
Judith: That’s a different one, it doesn’t have [Spaß] in it. It means I don’t understand anything. Okay, next word, what could I talk about?
Chuck: How about, let’s pick a long word, [Geschichte]
Judith: [Geschichte] Yes, [Köln hat eine lange Geschichte.]
Chuck: Cologne has a long history.
Judith: Or it can also mean story, as in [Bitte erzähle uns eine Geschichte.]
Chuck: Oh, please tell us a story.
Judith: And maybe [Letzter. Letzter Aufruf für die Passagiere von Flug X nach Mallorca.]
Chuck: Last call for passengers on flight X to Majorca, I’ve never heard of flight X before but okay. Jesus, a weird airport.
Judith: I didn’t want to think of a number.
Chuck: Yeah.
Judith: And Majorca is of course the 17th German state if you like. This is a holiday paradise for Germans where in the summer you will find almost exclusively Germans.
Chuck: I think it’s really like Hawaii would be for the states.
Judith: Yeah, except it’s not part of the country, it’s part of Spain.
Chuck: All right, so Mexico I guess.
Judith: Okay, another example of [Letzter. Im letzten Monat habe ich viel Deutsch gelernt.].
Chuck: In the last month I’ve learnt a lot of German. And I’m very proud of you for learning so much German.
Judith: I could had said the same of thing about Arabic, I obviously didn’t study German. I thought you might like us instead, you would want to say sometime. Okay, now [Nächster] as requested [Nächster. Am nächsten Dienstag gibt es die nächste Lektion.]
Chuck: On next Tuesday will be the next lesson.
Judith: Yes [Bis zum nächsten Mal.]
Chuck: Until next time.
Judith: Yup.
Chuck: Aha, that’s the way I would say we finish the lesson. All right so [Bis zum nächsten Mal.]
Judith: No, no, not yet, not yet.
Chuck: What, what?
Judith: First we do the dialogue.
Chuck: Oh, but you said [Bis zum nächsten Mal.] didn’t--
Judith: As an example sentence. But we’re almost done, just a dialogue.
Chuck: All right, all right.
A: Entschuldigung, wo ist das Museum der Stadtgeschichte?
D: Ah, das ist nicht weit weg. Sehen Sie die Bank da?
A: Ja, die Deutsche Bank?
D: Genau. An der Deutschen Bank gehen Sie rechts und dann an der nächsten Ampel links. Dann gehen Sie immer geradeaus, an den Universitätsgebäuden vorbei…
A: Da ist auch das Krankenhaus, oder?
D: Ach ja, stimmt. Ich war schon lange nicht mehr da... Das Museum ist gegenüber vom Krankenhaus, auf der rechten Straßenseite.
A: Wann waren Sie zum letzten Mal im Museum?
D: Ach, das war noch zu meiner Schulzeit, am Wandertag. Jetzt muss ich los. Viel Spaß im Museum!
A: Vielen Dank, tschüss!
D: Auf Wiedersehen!
OUTRO
Chuck: All right everyone now please go to the learning center and practice what you’ve learnt today.
Judith: You’re saying that Chuck? Hello, is this the real chuck?
Chuck: Well, I thought I could get some brownie points from you. I mean Christmas is coming soon.
Judith: Ha, Christmas. Well a subscription to GermanPod101, or one of our sister podcasts may be just the thing for somebody you know, if he’s interested in learning a foreign language.
Chuck: Or planning to go to a foreign country.
Judith: Or if you think he needs a push in the right direction, I’m seriously considering getting Chuck a subscription.
Chuck: Well, actually I thought maybe you could give me an iPhone application.
Judith: [Thats] easy, we have an iPhone app too.
Chuck: Oh, cool. Anyway, I wish probably not bore our listeners with this talk. Let’s talk about this after the show. All right, see you guys later. [Bis zum nächsten Mal.]
Judith: See you next time.

Slow Dialog

12 Comments

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GermanPod101.com
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
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GermanPod101.com
Tuesday at 12:09 pm
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Hallo Rani,


Thank you so much for your comment and nice feedback! We are happy to hear that!


I am glad to hear you got home! Technology is very useful! :grin:


If you have any questions, please let us know!


Vielen Dank!


Clara

Team GermanPod101.com

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Rani
Wednesday at 5:46 pm
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Chuck is so funny!! And Judith has been really cool dealing with him. I like them most, they're my favorite speakers!!! :heart::heart:

I once got lost in Germany, but thanks to technology, I managed to get home by using Google Maps. However, it would be nicer if I could speak German at that time and could ask a random-German-woman on the street for direction :smile: Now I'm hearing to Chuck+Judith every morning :sunglasses: Though still having difficulties with German grammar but I'm glad I've learned a lot!


Liebe Grüße aus Indonesien,

Rani

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Judith
Sunday at 5:27 am
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Ja, "ab". Das stand doch so da? (It was already spelled like that when I checked)


Nur "abbiegen" bedeutet "to turn into another street". "Biegen" allein bedeutet "to bend". Deshalb muss es "An der Ampel biegen Sie rechts AB" heißen.


Das Geschlecht für die Nomen steht dabei, z. B. steht da Ampel - traffic light - feminine.

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Richard Gill
Tuesday at 1:29 am
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Now posted for the right lesson!


Diese Lektion war Spa?. Und die Emaildiskussion auch interresant. Meine Frau ist aus Malta. In Sommer gibt es viele englisher Leute dahin. Es ist kleines England aber mit Sonne!

Genau wie Jason, ich finde fremd das „up“. Ist nicht „An der Ampel biegen sie rechts“ ohne andere wort auch richtig?

Eine Idee zu deine Kursmateriel verbessen. Ich gebrauche die „flashcards“ zu meine vokabeln lehrnen. Aber die Haupworter sind ohne seine Artikel. Ich denke dass mit der Artikel besser würden sein. Du machst es für die „video flashcards“ aber nicht für die Audiolektion. Zu machen richtig die Fälle, müss ich die Hauptworter artikel lehrnen. Im moment müss ich ein Worterbuch mit die „flashcards“ gebrauchen.

Chiao

Richard

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Jason
Thursday at 5:55 pm
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Hello!


Just to clarify: in the pdf: An der Ampel biegen Sie rechts up.


The "up" should be "ab" right?

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Judith
Wednesday at 7:47 pm
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You understood it right, Teri. Mallorca is obviously not Mexico, but it's a similarly popular spot for vacations.


I am sorry if we have come across as insensitive in the past, and I'm glad you're still listening. I always refer to Chuck when it comes to whether something can be said or not, but Chuck has emigrated to Germany for a reason and is often harsher on his own country than I would be. Please send me an e-mail at judith AT germanpod101.com regarding any comments you found offensive, and we'll see if we can salvage the situation. I would like everybody to enjoy listening to our podcasts.


Peter: :lol: We affectionately call them "Navi" (plural: Navi's). There are lots of them in Germany. But seeing you probably won't be able to park anywhere near the museum thanks to German city planning, being able to get walking directions is still a valuable skill.

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Peter
Tuesday at 5:29 pm
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Ich meinte, "In Deutschland gibt es KEIN Sat-Nav?'


:oops:

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Peter
Tuesday at 5:26 am
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Warum muss ich lernen, wie man fragt, wo das Museum ist? In Deutchland gibt es nicht Sat-Nav?

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Teri
Thursday at 1:16 am
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In reference to the comment above, I do not believe this to be the case at all. While these podcasts *have* been insensitive in the past regarding cultural differences between the US and Europe (so much so that I stopped listening for awhile), in this case they were saying that Mallorca is a major vacation area for Germans, so much that there are more Germans than Spaniards at some points. At the same time, places in Mexico like Cancun, are heavily visited by Americans. It was merely a comparison. In Italy, the Lago di Garda area is also nearly "German" because of all of the German-speaking tourists. Sometimes, you actually hear more German than Italian at cafes and shops.


Isn't that what you guys meant? Correct me if I am wrong.


For your intermediate lessons, could you please do a song by Juli?


Thanks,

Teri

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Victor
Wednesday at 8:18 pm
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Hello,


I'm Spanish and I have been listening to the podcasts for a while.


They are very good, however I found the Mallorca-Mexico joke rather in bad taste.

Did you mean to say that american people can't tell the difference between South America and Europe? Or they don't even care?

Then why even bother to learn a new lenguage?


I understand that these podcasts are aimed to USA but maybe you should review our cowboy's attitude to be a bit less weird to non-yankees. :grin:


Wait! Non-yankees? What? :grin:


Regards