Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Gina: Hello and Welcome back to GermanPod101.com. This is Absolute Beginner Season 3, Lesson 12: “An Amazing German Vowel-changing verb”. I’m Gina.
Frank: Hello, everyone, Frank here.
Gina: In this lesson, you’ll learn about vowel-changing verbs in German.
Frank: This conversation takes place at the language school.
Gina: It’s between Kate and Frank, a fellow student.
Frank: Since the speakers are both students and around the same age, they’ll be using informal German.
DIALOGUE
Frank: Hallo! Mein Name ist Frank. Bist du auch neu hier?
Kate: Ja. Ich bin auch neu. Ich heiße Kate. Woher kommst du, Frank?
Frank: Ich komme aus Österreich. Und du?
Kate: England. Sprichst du auch Englisch?
Frank: Wenig. Ich lerne hier seit fünf Jahren Spanisch. Hast du ein deutsches Handy?
Kate: Ja.
Frank: Was ist deine Handynummer?
Kate: 0173/48506229.
Frank: Danke. Meine ist 0151/36148297.
Gina: Let's hear the conversation one time slowly.
Frank: Hallo! Mein Name ist Frank. Bist du auch neu hier?
Kate: Ja. Ich bin auch neu. Ich heiße Kate. Woher kommst du, Frank?
Frank: Ich komme aus Österreich. Und du?
Kate: England. Sprichst du auch Englisch?
Frank: Wenig. Ich lerne hier seit fünf Jahren Spanisch. Hast du ein deutsches Handy?
Kate: Ja.
Frank: Was ist deine Handynummer?
Kate: 0173/48506229.
Frank: Danke. Meine ist 0151/36148297.
Gina: Now, let's hear it with English translation.
Frank: Hallo! Mein Name ist Frank. Bist du auch neu hier?
Gina: Hello! My name is Frank. Are you also new here?
Kate: Ja. Ich bin auch neu. Ich heiße Kate. Woher kommst du, Frank?
Gina: Yes. I'm new. My name is Kate. Where are you from, Frank?
Frank: Ich komme aus Österreich. Und du?
Gina: I'm from Austria. And you?
Kate: England. Sprichst du auch Englisch?
Gina: England. Do you also speak English?
Frank: Wenig. Ich lerne hier seit fünf Jahren Spanisch. Hast du ein deutsches Handy?
Gina: Just a little! I've been learning Spanish for five years. Do you have a German mobile?
Kate: Ja.
Gina: Yes.
Frank: Was ist deine Handynummer?
Gina: What is your mobile phone number?
Kate: 0173/48506229.
Gina: 0173/48506229.
Frank: Danke. Meine ist 0151/36148297.
Gina: Thanks. Mine is 0151/36148297.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Frank: Denglisch is what we call English words that German is adopting right now. We heard one in the dialog, handy.
Gina: It means “cell phone” or “mobile phone”
Frank: Another example is the word “meeting”; this word is tricky because people argue about the gender and what plural it should take.
Gina: Very often, they’ll just use the English plural, minus the rules that Germans can’t remember.
Frank: Yes. For example, “hobby” becomes “hobbys”.
Gina: but with “-y, s” instead of "-i, e, s."
Frank: Yes. It’s frustrating. However, there are also some words that have familiar endings for which there already is a rule in German. So they'll just follow that rule. For example, the plural of investor is Investoren.
Gina: There’s a lot of fake English in German too. Everybody will tell you that these words are English. But you may have never heard them before, at least not with that meaning.
Frank: Yeah, things like Handy.
Gina: Again, “cell phone” or “mobile phone”
Frank: Or call shop.
Gina: A place to make cheap calls to other countries.
Frank: Or beamer.
Gina: “Projector”. Okay, enough about Denglisch!
VOCAB LIST
Frank: dein [natural native speed]
Gina: your (informal)
Frank: dein [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: dein [natural native speed]
Frank: woher [natural native speed]
Gina: from where
Frank: woher [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: woher [natural native speed]
Frank: Englisch [natural native speed]
Gina: English language
Frank: Englisch [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: Englisch [natural native speed]
Frank: sprechen [natural native speed]
Gina: to speak
Frank: sprechen [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: sprechen [natural native speed]
Frank: wenig [natural native speed]
Gina: little
Frank: wenig [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: wenig [natural native speed]
Frank: schon [natural native speed]
Gina : already
Frank: schon [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank : schon [natural native speed]
Frank: neu [natural native speed]
Gina: new
Frank: neu [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: neu [natural native speed]
Frank: Spanisch [natural native speed]
Gina: Spanish
Frank: Spanisch [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: Spanisch [natural native speed]
Frank: geben [natural native speed]
Gina: to give
Frank: geben [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: geben [natural native speed]
Frank: Österreich [natural native speed]
Gina: Austria
Frank: Österreich [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Frank: Österreich [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Gina: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. What’s the first word?
Frank: Handynummer
Gina: “Cellphone number”. This can be separated into two words.
Frank: Handynummer is a compound noun consisting of the word Handy, which means “mobile phone”, and Nummer, the German word for “number”.
Gina: Which means that it’s two nouns stuck together.
Frank: Yes, well German is definitely a language of compound nouns! And they are notorious for it!
Gina: It’s true! So whenever there are two nouns next to each other that form one unit of meaning, in German we write them down as one word without a space.
Frank: Correct. Okay, now we should talk about zwei
Gina: which means “two”.
Frank: Zwei is also pronounced zwo when you’re giving out phone numbers. This is to make it easier to distinguish between zwei and drei. However, it’s not mandatory to pronounce zwo so long as you say it clearly.
Gina: Alright, on to the last word.
Frank: Englisch
Gina: “English” That’s easy! But beware, it’s not to be confused with an adjective in German.
Frank: In this case, Englisch, much like Spanisch in the dialogue, is a noun and refers to the language that is spoken as opposed to the people.
Gina: Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Gina: In this lesson, you’ll learn about vowel-changing verbs.
Frank: You've seen the verb essen before, meaning “to eat”.
Gina: This verb is not quite regular. And it’s actually part of a group of verbs called vowel-changing verbs.
Frank: Right, the thing these verbs all have in common is that they change their stem vowel at some point.
Gina: Yes, and they always change their stem vowel for the second and third person singular.
Frank: The du, er, sie, and es forms.
Gina: Let’s go through the forms for some of the vowel-changing verbs you've encountered so far.
Frank: Let’s start with the verb essen.
Gina: “to eat”
Frank: ich esse
Gina: “I eat”, or “I'm eating”
Frank: du isst
Gina: “you eat”, or “you're eating” Can you hear the difference here, listeners?
Frank: er isst, sie isst, es isst
Gina: “he eats” or “he's eating”, “she eats” or “she's eating”, and “it eats” or “it's eating”, respectively
Frank: One more time, repeat after me listeners - er isst, (pause) sie isst, (pause) es isst (pause)
Gina: Now let’s try the verb “to give”
Frank: geben
Gina: So “I give” is
Frank: ich gebe, ich gebe (slow)
Gina: What about “you give”?
Frank: du gibst
Gina: One more time?
Frank: du gibst
Gina: Now let’s move on to the third person singular…
Frank: er gibt
Gina: “he gives”
Frank: Sie gibt
Gina: “she gives”
Frank: Es gibt
Gina: “It gives”
Frank: Let’s just remind our listeners that es gibt is used a lot because it’s equivalent to “there is”.
Gina: One more time, listeners.
Frank: es gibt.
Gina: How about “we give”?
Frank: wir geben
Gina: And next up is…
Frank: ihr gebt
Gina: meaning “you give”. The plural version.
Frank: Sie geben
Gina: Meaning “they give”.
Frank: Shall we do one more, Gina? How about sprechen, “to speak”?
Gina: Okay, let’s go through them!
Frank: ich spreche
Gina: “I speak”.
Frank: du sprichst
Gina: “you speak”
Frank: er spricht.
Gina: “he speaks”
Frank: sie spricht
Gina: “She speaks”
Frank: es spricht.
Gina: “it speaks”
Frank: wir sprechen
Gina: “we speak”.
Frank: Ihr sprecht
Gina: “you speak”, in plural form.
Frank: sie sprechen
Gina: "They speak"
Frank: Sie sprechen, the conjugation for the polite form “you” and the third person plural form for “you”.
Gina: Same conjugation, but due to the pronoun difference, the capital “S” for the polite form of “you” versus the non-capitalized version for the third person plural sie.
Frank: Okay, we’ll leave it there for the verbs!
Gina: Once you're comfortable with these, vowel-changing verbs won't be much of a problem, because they're logical in their own way.
Frank: Right. Overall, you can see that in the conjugations, the differences are always for the second person singular pronoun du and the third person singular er, sie, and es.
Gina: So pay close attention to those second and third person forms!
Frank: And another thing - the vowel is always an “E” changing to an “I” or an “A” changing to an “Ä” - which is an A with an umlaut.
Gina: So there’s a pattern to help you along the way.
Frank: It’s pretty straightforward. And with that we say Viel Glück! Good luck!

Outro

Gina: That’s all for this lesson. Thanks for listening and we’ll see you all next time!
Frank: Viel spass! Tschüss!

3 Comments

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Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.

GermanPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hello Listeners, do you know any Denglisch? Share it here!

GermanPod101.comVerified
Monday at 2:31 pm
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Hi Ron,


Thanks for sharing these words with us. Yes, we use them all...


Kind Regards,

Katrin

Team GermanPod101.com

Ronn
Friday at 1:46 am
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Hier sind einige Wörter, die aus (von) Englisch kommen ...

designt, gecancelt, gelayoutet, downgeloadet und gehighlightet usw.

Quelle: Erkundungen, Sprachniveau C1