Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
John:
Hi everyone, and welcome back to GermanPod101.com. This is Business German for Beginners Season 1 Lesson 14 - Apologizing When You Forget Something. John Here.
Jennifer:
Guten Tag! I'm Jennifer.
John:
In this lesson, you’ll learn how to apologize for something you forgot to do. The conversation takes place in the office.
Jennifer:
It's between Linda Müller and Stefan Herzog.
John:
The speakers are colleagues, therefore, they will speak informal German. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Linda Müller:
Hast du das Datenmaterial mitgebracht?
Stefan Herzog:
Das Datenmaterial...?
Linda Müller:
Ja, die über die Werbekampagne.
Stefan Herzog:
...Oh, Verzeihung! Ich habe es völlig vergessen sie auszudrucken.
Linda Müller:
Das ist problematisch...
Stefan Herzog:
Ich könnte sie in etwa einer Stunde bereit haben.
John:
Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Linda Müller:
Hast du das Datenmaterial mitgebracht?
Stefan Herzog:
Das Datenmaterial...?
Linda Müller:
Ja, die über die Werbekampagne.
Stefan Herzog:
...Oh, Verzeihung! Ich habe es völlig vergessen sie auszudrucken.
Linda Müller:
Das ist problematisch...
Stefan Herzog:
Ich könnte sie in etwa einer Stunde bereit haben.
John:
Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Linda Müller:
Did you bring the data?
Stefan Herzog:
The data...?
Linda Müller:
Yes, about the advertising campaign.
Stefan Herzog:
...oh, I'm sorry! I completely forgot to print it out!
Linda Müller:
That's a problem...
Stefan Herzog:
I can have it ready in an hour!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
John:
It sounds like Linda forgot something important!
Jennifer:
Yeah, she said that she could have it ready in an hour. I hope that will be good enough!
John:
So the data is for an advertising campaign. What’s advertising like in Germany?
Jennifer:
I have a question for you, John. Can you guess how much German companies spent on advertising last year?
John:
Oh wow, I have no idea. Give me a hint.
Jennifer:
Okay, how many billions of Euros did they spend?
John:
Billions? Um, 12 billion?
Jennifer:
Higher.
John:
20 billion?
Jennifer:
Actually, it was 29.2 billion Euros in total. German companies invested 0.3 billion in advertising on mobile devices.
John:
I’m sure that number will just keep increasing.
Jennifer:
Right!
John:
Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
John:
Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Jennifer:
mitbringen [natural native speed]
John:
to bring along
Jennifer:
mitbringen[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jennifer:
mitbringen [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Jennifer:
Datenmaterial [natural native speed]
John:
data
Jennifer:
Datenmaterial[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jennifer:
Datenmaterial [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Jennifer:
Werbekampagne [natural native speed]
John:
advertising campaign
Jennifer:
Werbekampagne[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jennifer:
Werbekampagne [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Jennifer:
Verzeihung [natural native speed]
John:
apology
Jennifer:
Verzeihung[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jennifer:
Verzeihung [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Jennifer:
problematisch [natural native speed]
John:
problematic
Jennifer:
problematisch[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jennifer:
problematisch [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Jennifer:
etwa [natural native speed]
John:
approximately, surely not (in questions)
Jennifer:
etwa[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jennifer:
etwa [natural native speed]
John:
Next we have...
Jennifer:
Stunde [natural native speed]
John:
hour
Jennifer:
Stunde[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jennifer:
Stunde [natural native speed]
John:
And last...
Jennifer:
bereit haben [natural native speed]
John:
to have ready
Jennifer:
bereit haben[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Jennifer:
bereit haben [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
John:
Let's have a closer look at one of the words from this lesson. The word is...
Jennifer:
problematisch
John:
Meaning "problematic." Tell us about this word, Jennifer.
Jennifer:
This comes from the noun das Problem.
John:
Which means, “the problem.”
Jennifer:
There are several adjectives that end with tisch.
John:
Can you give us an example or two?
Jennifer:
Romantisch and gigantisch.
John:
“Romantic” and “gigantic,” respectively. Can you give us an example using “problematic?”
Jennifer:
Sure. For example, you can say, Das könnte problematisch werden.
John:
...which means "That can be problematic."
John:
Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

John:
In this lesson, you'll learn about apologizing for something you forgot to do. Everybody forgets something eventually, especially if you’re really busy and have several things to take care of.
Jennifer:
Yes, the important thing is how you deal with it.
John:
What should you do if you forget something while working for a German business?
Jennifer:
You may need to excuse yourself. You can use Verzeihung and Entschuldigen Sie in a formal situation. Entschuldigung and Entschuldige are good in an informal situation.
John:
Are there any differences between those words?
Jennifer:
You must use Entschuldigt if you are talking to more than one person.
John:
Okay. So next, let’s look at the verb “to forget.”
Jennifer:
Yes, let’s not forget about that!
John:
I’d rather forget that joke...
Jennifer:
Sorry! In German, “to forget” is vergessen. It’s an irregular verb.
John:
We need to say “I have forgotten…” so we will use it in the past perfect tense.
Jennifer:
Ich habe vergessen.
John:
How do we say “you have forgotten?”
Jennifer:
Du hast vergessen.
John:
Or “she has forgotten?”
Jennifer:
Sie hat vergessen.
John:
In the dialogue, after Linda explained what had happened, she said she’d fix the problem in an hour.
Jennifer:
If you make a mistake, people will expect you to fix it in a professional way.
John:
If you’re lucky, you’ll probably also find that your colleagues will try to help you. What are some phrases we can use to show that we're trying to fix it?
Jennifer:
If the situation is not too complicated, you can say Ich werde so schnell wie mögliche eine Lösung finden.
John:
“I’ll find a solution right away.” If you also know when you can have the situation fixed, you should add that information as well.
Jennifer:
In the dialogue we saw this in Ich könnte sie in etwa einer Stunde bereit haben
John:
which means “I can have it ready in an hour.”
Jennifer:
If the situation is more complicated, you’d better say: Ich werde mich so schnell wie möglich darum kümmern.
John:
“I’ll try to find a solution right away.” Is there anything to avoid?
Jennifer:
Try not to be vague, so don’t use vielleicht.
John:
That means “maybe.”

Outro

John:
Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Jennifer:
Auf Wiedersehen!

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